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Do you have Savant-like Abilities?
No. 55%  55%  [ 62 ]
Yes, I'm an Aspie. 35%  35%  [ 39 ]
Yes, I'm an Autie. 11%  11%  [ 12 ]
Total votes : 113

LemonDemon
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18 Aug 2008, 12:01 am

ImMelody wrote:
I'm curious (from the link between asperger's and genius thread) how many people feel they have savant-like abilities... Not only if they feel they have them, but what they are. Just call me curious.. I've always been rather inquisitive!"


I can draw (correctly) whatever I see. My grandparents have pictures I did when I was first able to hold a pencil/pen of various cartoons from the books and newspapers, didn't move on to animals and people until late elementary school, though. The only feeling that goes with 'em is extreme disgust from childhood when people informed me I couldn't possibly be drawing something, - as I was working on it - . I'm pretty sure my ability was acquired, though, due to eyesight complications in childhood. As far as 'idiot savant' goes, the concept is rude. Seems to be based on what people expect others to accomplish. If they don't think you're up to par, then there's no way you can do ----. Gets really irritating really friggen fast. I didn't add to the poll. Perhaps if the poll were based on observations by others you'd get better statistics, people in general have a leaning for overstatement. A reasonably good skill wouldn't be considered 'savant', no matter what it was. I memorize poetry and quotation bits I like for fun, got quite a repertoire, but that doesn't make it a highly skilled ability, just an unusual one in this day and age.


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Last edited by LemonDemon on 18 Aug 2008, 1:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

LemonDemon
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18 Aug 2008, 12:25 am

Jenk wrote:
:D

"Savant syndrome is exceedingly rare, but a remarkable condition in which persons with autism, or other serious mental handicaps, or major mental illness, have astonishing islands of ability or brilliance that stand out in stark contrast to their overall disability. The condition can be congenital or be acquired by an otherwise normal individual following CNS injury or disease. It occurs in males more frequently than in females in an approximate ratio of 6 to 1. The skills can appear suddenly, without explanation, and have been reported as sometimes disappearing just as suddenly. It is useful to put these special skills into the following three categories: Splinter Skills where the individual possesses specific skills that stand in contrast to their overall level of functioning, Talented Savants where the individual displays a high level of ability that is in contrast to their disability, and Prodigious Savants which involves a much rarer form of the condition, where the ability or brilliance is not only spectacular in contrast to the disability, but would be spectacular even if viewed in a non-disabled person. It is very likely that many savants do go unnoticed, and depending upon whether the three categories above are recognized, estimates of the incidence of savant syndrome can vary widely. In the case of prodigious savants it has been estimated that there may be fewer than 100 cases reported in the world literature in the past 100 years."


It's odd that they don't leave room for 'combinations'. Mine would be, by your paragraphs, considered prodigious. My eyesight is horrible. (light, fer instance. Bright, direct sunlight gives me red light in my vision when I'm behind any sort of glass. Pretty, but not useful). Things are also blurry after a few feet, depending on size and colors of the object, it takes me a few moments to a few minutes to puzzle out everyday items, like street signs. And sometimes I recognize the item wrong. My spatial skills are beyond excellent, but once I move, I'm screwed all to hell because I've got to sort out where I am in relation to everything else. Combined with one of my eyes being total crap, doesn't leave me in good odds. Tendency to bump into things. There's a long list of complaints, doubt anyone want to read 'em.

I can tell you why they're unrecognized, though! At last, I'm useful ^.^. People get bored of the products of the ability when presented with them on a constant basis. They become part of the back round, and taken for granted once everyone else is used to them. The talent is no longer 'unique', so it isn't generally commented on. At least, not in a positive way. If I counted the number of times I've heard things along the lines of "How can you draw/paint - that - and still not see well enough to -insert-action-here", I'd have lost count long ago. That sentiment tends to intersect with erroneous preconceptions about disability too, though, quite a lot of people are familiar with it in that regard.


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LemonDemon
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18 Aug 2008, 1:11 am

Pobodys_Nerfect wrote:
Jan74 wrote:
Statistically, 48% of the people here cannot possibly have savant abilities. So... maybe the poll should be "do you have an inflated sense of self?"


Maybe you need to inflate yourself a bit. Go on. Have a go :D


At any rate, splinter skills are considered a kind of savant ability. What constitutes a splinter skill (how comprehensive does it need to be before it's elevated from quirk, I'd like to know?) seems to be another matter.


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18 Aug 2008, 1:24 am

It's been mentioned to me twice about my memory like for numbers or remembering dates.


But I don't think I have a savant like ability. Sometimes I think I do and other times I don't think I do.



Dee_
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22 Aug 2008, 3:43 am

I was not an expert, nor do I remember the details... That intrest did not last long.

Crucify me for not being as detailed as you would like, for it did not meet your criteria by your response.


large pot transistor... a PNP transistor, it is sort of round with three pins sticking out and it is on the large size, bit smaller than a dime but made to handle a bit more amperage than the smaller PNP/NPN transistors.

I soldered a resistor over another one which shorted out. The resistor created an open circuit on the board. I simply replaced it with another resistor.

I have been reading since the age of 3 and had/still have an interest in acquiring knoledge. I learned the way of reading books on different subjects at the library and this was back in 1984 which I was referring to.

I said it was a television, was not a PC motherboard.

Are you equating me with some jerk in highschool that shown you a junk soldier joint?



LabPet
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22 Aug 2008, 11:43 am

Dee_ wrote:
I was not an expert, nor do I remember the details... That intrest did not last long.

Crucify me for not being as detailed as you would like, for it did not meet your criteria by your response.


large pot transistor... a PNP transistor, it is sort of round with three pins sticking out and it is on the large size, bit smaller than a dime but made to handle a bit more amperage than the smaller PNP/NPN transistors.

I soldered a resistor over another one which shorted out. The resistor created an open circuit on the board. I simply replaced it with another resistor.

I have been reading since the age of 3 and had/still have an interest in acquiring knoledge. I learned the way of reading books on different subjects at the library and this was back in 1984 which I was referring to.

I said it was a television, was not a PC motherboard.



I think you're creative and gifted - P.S. I like resistors too. (As in neural resistors, but same concept).

Sure, anyone can be critical in making their assessment and true savants are unusual, but not much is known about savants and their thought processes either. In actuality, I have been labeled 'savant,' but there are diagnostic problems with this so I cannot take much stock in any assessment - too many variables. I am a HFA, by Dx.

BTW, have any of you watched Stephen Wiltshire!! !! Check him out (google) - he's astounding.


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