Page 2 of 3 [ 41 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

Jkid
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jan 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 487
Location: College Park,MD

28 Aug 2008, 5:20 pm

Even though I'm a sucker for prison and jail documentaries, I'm would still not figure out how to survive in jail or in central booking.



ADoyle
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Dec 2005
Age: 45
Gender: Female
Posts: 913
Location: Southern California, USA

28 Aug 2008, 10:37 pm

Liopleurodon wrote:
I'm extremely unlikely to get arrested. The mere thought of breaking the rules seriously makes my brain hurt.


I'm the same way, I'm especially cautious about traffic laws as well, and have never gotten a ticket.


_________________
"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason,
and intellect has intended us to forgo their use."
- Galileo Galilei


k_semler
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 12 Oct 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 31
Location: Pullman WA

15 Oct 2008, 3:33 am

I had to do 48 in June for a DUI. I was worried about it from all the media exposure about the decrepit conditions within correctional institutions. I found much of that to be purely nothing but media hype. Jail isn't fun, but I didn't find it dangerous. It was just very boring. When I got admitted, I did the old "bend n' spread", and got admitted to GenPop. It was the first time incarcerated, (discounting the actual DUI arrest), so I didn't know WTF was going on. After I got walked to my cell, (I went to HS with the CO that admitted me), I asked if I could go "out there", (meaning common area), or if I had to stay "in here", (meaning my specific cell). I was informed that until 2200, I could be in the common area, but from 2200-0600 is lockdown. Lights out is at 0 hour.

Anyways, after making my bed in my cell, I wandered out with my book that I brought in, and sat at the ping-pong table since nobody was playing it, and started to read. I read for about 10 minutes, when some dude came up and asked me why I was in here. I told him, and he seemed satisfied with my response, (why he asked, I have no clue). He then asked if he could try my glasses, (prescription). Seeing no harm in it, I handed them over to him to try. He looked through them and gave them back. I read for the rest of the night, minimally communicating with other prisoners. (only finding out what time meals were served, and why guards keep walking through here every hour) I smoke, and tobacco is considered a controlled substance within the WA state correctional institution, so I was nicking out pretty bad on the second day.

The first day complete, I asked somebody if they had a view of the outside from their cell, because I had a tree in my window, and couldn't see outside. I went to the window and stared out it for a while, wanting just to go home. Deciding that was pointless, I went back to reading, and watching TV. After a while, I got "stir crazy" so I went out to the rec yard, and shot some hoops for about 45 minutes while running my ass off. I was alone for most of it, and because the net was too small for the ball, I had to use a broom handle to knock down the ball every time I made a basket. After doing that for a while, people started to come out, so I went back inside, and watched a card game called "spades". I still don't know what the goal of that game is. We ate, and then watched TV some more. I read more of my book, and occasionally glanced up at the TV to see if there was anything interesting on. There wasn't, so I kept on reading. Then it was lockdown time, so I went to bed, having had enough of being awake, (2 hours of light is available after lockdown).

The second day, (release day), the nicotine withdrawals weren't bad, and I started reading a second book. After the count, everybody else except for me went to bed, so I had the entire day room to myself until approximately 1130. I watched almost the entire "Band Of Brothers" series on the History Channel, (nobody else was competing for TV, so I was able to watch what I wanted to without disturbing anyone's preferences). After lunch, the place started to fill up, and somebody changed the TV to some dumb movie channel. I picked up the book, and continued on reading. I was released at 1823, exactly 48 hours after admittance to the facility. Other then the last 2 hours seeming to almost stand still, the second day wasn't bad.

After release, I immediately lit up a cigarette, and smoked the entire thing. My vehicle was less then 100 yards away, and I had a second cigarette lit up before I reached it. I went to mc donalds to get "real food" to eat on the drive home, (Realistically, I probably ate healthier while in custody then I do while I'm free), and went home to go online.

From my limited experience with the penal system, I have a few guidelines that seemed to be successful.

1. Keep your mouth shut. Don't speak unless somebody speaks to you, and respond to the inquiries in a respectful manner, (don't insult them, or make them appear intellectually inferior to you, [even if they obviously are stupid]) You can cuss to your desire, so long as it isn't used to insult them.
2. Do not discuss politics, racism, or religion under any circumstance. Ever.
3. Keep to yourself, and leave them alone. The favor will be reciprocated.
4. Do not appear to be hostile or threatening, and do not appear to be a weakling. When you are walking somewhere, walk with purpose, and be aware of your surroundings.
5. Heightened awareness, (but not paranoia), will help you to determine the potentially dangerous inmates. Don't piss these people off, but don't cower either. If you cower, you will be exploited.
6. Look out for #1. Nobody else will, (the COs are there to keep you there, not ensure your safety when you're pissing off the entire pod), and some inmates will exploit you if you let your guard down, (or trust them too much).
7. Do not create unnecessary noise, (lockdown is also quiet hours). Other inmates are trying to sleep.
8. Don't hog the phone. There's only 1, and there are 16 inmates in the pod. Other people need to make calls too.



Catster2
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Age: 41
Gender: Female
Posts: 587

15 Oct 2008, 4:50 am

k_semler wrote:
I had to do 48 in June for a DUI. I was worried about it from all the media exposure about the decrepit conditions within correctional institutions. I found much of that to be purely nothing but media hype. Jail isn't fun, but I didn't find it dangerous. It was just very boring. When I got admitted, I did the old "bend n' spread", and got admitted to GenPop. It was the first time incarcerated, (discounting the actual DUI arrest), so I didn't know WTF was going on. After I got walked to my cell, (I went to HS with the CO that admitted me), I asked if I could go "out there", (meaning common area), or if I had to stay "in here", (meaning my specific cell). I was informed that until 2200, I could be in the common area, but from 2200-0600 is lockdown. Lights out is at 0 hour.

Anyways, after making my bed in my cell, I wandered out with my book that I brought in, and sat at the ping-pong table since nobody was playing it, and started to read. I read for about 10 minutes, when some dude came up and asked me why I was in here. I told him, and he seemed satisfied with my response, (why he asked, I have no clue). He then asked if he could try my glasses, (prescription). Seeing no harm in it, I handed them over to him to try. He looked through them and gave them back. I read for the rest of the night, minimally communicating with other prisoners. (only finding out what time meals were served, and why guards keep walking through here every hour) I smoke, and tobacco is considered a controlled substance within the WA state correctional institution, so I was nicking out pretty bad on the second day.

The first day complete, I asked somebody if they had a view of the outside from their cell, because I had a tree in my window, and couldn't see outside. I went to the window and stared out it for a while, wanting just to go home. Deciding that was pointless, I went back to reading, and watching TV. After a while, I got "stir crazy" so I went out to the rec yard, and shot some hoops for about 45 minutes while running my ass off. I was alone for most of it, and because the net was too small for the ball, I had to use a broom handle to knock down the ball every time I made a basket. After doing that for a while, people started to come out, so I went back inside, and watched a card game called "spades". I still don't know what the goal of that game is. We ate, and then watched TV some more. I read more of my book, and occasionally glanced up at the TV to see if there was anything interesting on. There wasn't, so I kept on reading. Then it was lockdown time, so I went to bed, having had enough of being awake, (2 hours of light is available after lockdown).

The second day, (release day), the nicotine withdrawals weren't bad, and I started reading a second book. After the count, everybody else except for me went to bed, so I had the entire day room to myself until approximately 1130. I watched almost the entire "Band Of Brothers" series on the History Channel, (nobody else was competing for TV, so I was able to watch what I wanted to without disturbing anyone's preferences). After lunch, the place started to fill up, and somebody changed the TV to some dumb movie channel. I picked up the book, and continued on reading. I was released at 1823, exactly 48 hours after admittance to the facility. Other then the last 2 hours seeming to almost stand still, the second day wasn't bad.

After release, I immediately lit up a cigarette, and smoked the entire thing. My vehicle was less then 100 yards away, and I had a second cigarette lit up before I reached it. I went to mc donalds to get "real food" to eat on the drive home, (Realistically, I probably ate healthier while in custody then I do while I'm free), and went home to go online.

From my limited experience with the penal system, I have a few guidelines that seemed to be successful.

1. Keep your mouth shut. Don't speak unless somebody speaks to you, and respond to the inquiries in a respectful manner, (don't insult them, or make them appear intellectually inferior to you, [even if they obviously are stupid]) You can cuss to your desire, so long as it isn't used to insult them.
2. Do not discuss politics, racism, or religion under any circumstance. Ever.
3. Keep to yourself, and leave them alone. The favor will be reciprocated.
4. Do not appear to be hostile or threatening, and do not appear to be a weakling. When you are walking somewhere, walk with purpose, and be aware of your surroundings.
5. Heightened awareness, (but not paranoia), will help you to determine the potentially dangerous inmates. Don't piss these people off, but don't cower either. If you cower, you will be exploited.
6. Look out for #1. Nobody else will, (the COs are there to keep you there, not ensure your safety when you're pissing off the entire pod), and some inmates will exploit you if you let your guard down, (or trust them too much).
7. Do not create unnecessary noise, (lockdown is also quiet hours). Other inmates are trying to sleep.
8. Don't hog the phone. There's only 1, and there are 16 inmates in the pod. Other people need to make calls too.


k_semlerk_semler Wow your story sounds very interesting glad you survived it ok and it wasnt too bad. Jail for DUI is tough the US justice system is tough here unless you do it repeatedly, have a very high DUI reading (legal BAC is .05 here) or hurt someone you wont go to jail just lose your licence and get a fine. As a probationary driver (got my licence in August) I have to have .00 BAC until August 29th 2011. I dont drink so it is ok. A lot of aspies end up in trouble partially due to their condition but it seems you handled it pretty well



DentArthurDent
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2008
Age: 56
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,884
Location: Victoria, Australia

15 Oct 2008, 7:41 am

Yep I have spent a day or so in police lock ups in the UK, Aus, and 2 days in Curry County Jail in the US. UK for graffiti Aus and US for environmental protest, luckily each time I have been on my own. I got a bit scared in Curry county because the smart arses put me in a cell next to a logger who was in for bashing a greenie, of course they had to tell him that I had been arrested with Greenpeace. He kept threatening that when we were allowed out for our walk he was going to bash me. It was all pretty humiliating, in the US you have to shower in front of the guards, bend over so they can check youve got nothing up ya bum 8O , or under your sack, really nice :(

2 days was bad. I dont think I could cope with a full sentence


_________________
"I'd take the awe of understanding over the awe of ignorance anyday"
Douglas Adams

"Religion is the impotence of the human mind to deal with occurrences it cannot understand" Karl Marx


15 Oct 2008, 8:43 am

I had only been arrested once because some store owner thought I took something without paying for it. I was handcuffed and brought to the police station but no cell. They called my parents and told them to come and get me because I had been arrested.



NocturnalQuilter
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Oct 2008
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 937

15 Oct 2008, 12:35 pm

Quote:
I know no one will probably want to admit, but I was wondereing of the consequences.


Surprise!
I was arrested and booked for the use and possession of meth about 6 years ago. I will spare the intimate details. Suffice to say it was an experience I will never, ever forget. Forget telling anyone about the autism- chances are they won't care, and if they do there is precious little that can be done to accommodate it.
Tell them you have tested positive for TB and you are garaunteed a private room until after they do their own examination (chest x-rays).
After completeing the court-mandated program my record has been expunged so I can legally say that I have never been convicted of a felony.



Triangular_Trees
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2007
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,799

15 Oct 2008, 12:40 pm

If I were ever in jail, I'd wait till the guard was nearby and start swinging punches.

Being in solitairy confinement is much safer

Course maybe I shouldn't say that being as my seizure behavior can land me in jai if they cops don't have the sense to notice my bracelet and call medic alert when I run around threatening to kill people. And I think if I were in jail for that I'd be doing everything in my power to get right out


_________________
Did I post an attack on you? If so, please read this before making a reply

http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt74894.html


cosmiccat
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2007
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,504
Location: Philadelphia

15 Oct 2008, 2:34 pm

Quoting Blasty:

Quote:
I think it's really sh***y that some people will use their disability to get special treatment when they don't need it. When people deliberately use thier AS, autism, or whatever they have as a crutch, it really makes the rest of us look like weak slackers
.

I agree that one shouldn't "use" a "disability" to get special treatment - but really, I think it should be made known to law enforcement or medical staff, especially ER staff, that Autism or Asperger's is present. If certain behavior appears to be abnormal or inappropriate (confrontational, agitated, confused, aggressive) to those making an arrest or providing medical treatment, that information (that the person in question is autistic) would be vital for them (police/doctors) to accurately assess the situation and the individual and to follow up with a proper course of action.


Quote:
If they didn't crack you with the nightstick a couple times as Drakilor suspected, they should have.


This is an absolutely horrid thing for you to say, Blasty. Has someone perhaps cracked you with a night stick once too often? I don't understand that kind of mentality. It's crude to say the least. Maybe you were just going for a laugh. Not Funny!



anna-banana
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,682
Location: Europe

15 Oct 2008, 7:00 pm

I get in trouble all the time, been in custody a few times for graffiti and possesion of illegal substances and once for driving without a license (all drivers were drunk so I figured it was safer if I sat behind the wheel... biiiig mistake lol).

quite a few times I witnessed some trouble and every time I described the situation to the police the cops suspected me of lying and stuff... guess it's the eye-contact thingy. anyway, they never believed me and thought I was a part of the trouble, and the worst thing is- I really have a remarkable memory and could describe all faces, cars and everything in detail... still they thought I just looked guilty lol


_________________
not a bug - a feature.


Tahitiii
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jul 2008
Age: 65
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,214
Location: USA

15 Oct 2008, 7:50 pm

Um... I don't think they're going to fluff your pillow and sing you a lullaby. I've never been there, but I've heard enough first-had stories that I don't want to find out for myself. I haven't had much contact with cops, but what little I've seen was bad. I would expect the jails to catch on last to any social movement.

Are you afraid of being accused of a crime you didnt commit?
http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt73414.html



Triangular_Trees
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2007
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,799

15 Oct 2008, 9:57 pm

anna-banana wrote:
I get in trouble all the time, been in custody a few times for graffiti and possesion of illegal substances and once for driving without a license (all drivers were drunk so I figured it was safer if I sat behind the wheel... biiiig mistake lol).

quite a few times I witnessed some trouble and every time I described the situation to the police the cops suspected me of lying and stuff... guess it's the eye-contact thingy. anyway, they never believed me and thought I was a part of the trouble, and the worst thing is- I really have a remarkable memory and could describe all faces, cars and everything in detail... still they thought I just looked guilty lol



I get accused of using illegal substances quite often. Then when the multiple drug tests don't show anything, they accuse me of being psychotic.

never mind that one of the first things I've told them is I have a history of temporal lobe epilepsy thats known to cause hallucinations and weird behavior.


Thats one of the reasons I choose a medic alert bracelet as opposed to a necklace (the necklace probably wouldn't be safe for me anyway) but at least the bracelet is more visible. If city cops saw me when I was post ictal, I'd likely end up being one of the people tasered while they're friend is beside them saying "he's having a seizure, he doesn't know whats going on."

At least I don't think the cops around here have tasers


_________________
Did I post an attack on you? If so, please read this before making a reply

http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt74894.html


Rebecca_L
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 28 May 2008
Age: 58
Gender: Female
Posts: 260

15 Oct 2008, 10:41 pm

I got taken to jail for selling encyclopedias door to door once. I was in a county that didn't allow unlicensed "solicitation" (which I did not know) and a cop decided to bring me in instead of giving me a warning. (Maybe he was having a slow week.) He kept telling the other officers I had been "soliciting without a license" (which I thought made me sound like a prostitute) but the other officers were kind of smirking at him. I have a really honest, fresh-off-the-farm type face, so I don't think they were convinced he'd made a big collar. I didn't get a ticket or get processed into a jail cell. They let me wait in the processing waiting room while my supervisor for the company I was selling encyclopedias for came and posted bail or something. (I never saw a judge, so I don't know exactly what the deal was.) They wanted me to go back out selling door to door the next day, though, so I quit. I am NOT a lawbreaker. Now if they'd gotten me the proper permit or license I would have been fine, but once I know the rules I pretty much HAVE to follow them.



philosopherBoi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Aug 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,255

15 Oct 2008, 10:57 pm

I was locked up in jail because I held two large butcher knives to my throat and my parents called 911. They came in with a taser gun pointed at me I knew how bad it would hurt I put the knives down very definitely and they made me sit in a chair they said something I kicked a table knocked my marble chess set to the ground they tasered me I screamed and accidently kicked on in the leg I got a slap on the wrist but they did put me in the nut house.

God being in jail was easier than being harassed in the nut house at least in the jail cell I was left alone and could read all day, and the bed was more comfy too go figure.


_________________
When Jesus Christ said love thy neighbor he was not making a suggestion he was stating the law of god.


jawbrodt
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,766
Location: Eastern USA

15 Oct 2008, 11:23 pm

I have been to jail 6 times throughout my life, and have accumulated just over 1 year of inprisonment. There was no special treatment for me. The worst part of it all was that I had to wait up to a week to get on my meds, because you needed to see the jail psych first. That makes for one very long week. I should add that I wasn't dx'ed with AS until after my last sentence, until then, I had been dx'ed with social anxiety/panic disorder. There is no special treatment for mental disabilities, unless the court say's so. The jails only job is to hold you, and keep you alive. If you require special treatment, you shouldn't be there, and that's up to the judge to decide. You have to be extremely disabled to get a "get out of jail" ticket. My advice is.... don't do it, or don't get caught if you don't think you can handle jail, because they don't care about you as long as you aren't about to die. Also, if you mention suicide, they will put you in a padded straight-jacket. I don't plan on ever going back.


_________________
Those who speak, don't know.

Those who know, don't speak.


k_semler
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 12 Oct 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 31
Location: Pullman WA

16 Oct 2008, 3:36 am

Catster2 wrote:
Wow your story sounds very interesting glad you survived it ok and it wasnt too bad. Jail for DUI is tough the US justice system is tough here unless you do it repeatedly, have a very high DUI reading (legal BAC is .05 here) or hurt someone you wont go to jail just lose your licence and get a fine. As a probationary driver (got my license in August) I have to have .00 BAC until August 29th 2011. I dont drink so it is ok. A lot of aspies end up in trouble partially due to their condition but it seems you handled it pretty well


Here in the US, the legal BAC for individuals over 21 years of age is 0.080. For minors, (those persons who have not reached 21 years of age), the legal BAC is 0.020. The night I got arrested for DUI, I blew a 0.227 and a 0.224, (three times the legal limit). License was suspended for 90 days, and I had to get an alcohol evaluation, (passed it with ease), complete the A/DIS class, and am required to have an ignition interlock device installed in my vehicle for 1 calendar year. Even under court-ordered probation, (2 years, [1 year supervised, 1 year unsupervised]), the legal BAC for me, (as an alcohol offender), is 0.025. For the first year of probation, I am prohibited from consuming alcohol. After that, I can get as intoxicated as I like, I am just prohibited from driving with a BAC of 0.025 or above, (for my body weight, that essentially means no driving w/i 24 hours of drinking). So when I can legally drink again, I'll only be able to on Friday nights, and Saturdays, (all day).