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Lepidoptera
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04 Dec 2008, 2:59 pm

How about Dr. Spencer Reid on Criminal Minds?



anna-banana
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04 Dec 2008, 3:11 pm

Lepidoptera wrote:
How about Dr. Spencer Reid on Criminal Minds?


yes we had that:

violet_yoshi wrote:
MartyMoose wrote:
The thin nerdy smart guy on Criminal Minds


You forgot to mention that he's cute too! :heart:


I don't watch it so no idea who's the cute one though ;p


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violet_yoshi
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04 Dec 2008, 5:28 pm

anna-banana wrote:
Lepidoptera wrote:
How about Dr. Spencer Reid on Criminal Minds?


yes we had that:

violet_yoshi wrote:
MartyMoose wrote:
The thin nerdy smart guy on Criminal Minds


You forgot to mention that he's cute too! :heart:


I don't watch it so no idea who's the cute one though ;p


It's this guy:

http://images1.fanpop.com/images/image_ ... 77_500.jpg



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06 Dec 2008, 1:06 am

Bones, Bones, Bones, Bones, Bones. I like that show for different reasons than most others who do, I think: they laugh (not meanly, really, but at the so-called bizarreness of it) at her awkward social behaviour and detached nature; I delight in it because I agree with the way she reacts to situations - I would do the same.



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06 Dec 2008, 2:42 am

It's years since I've read this book, so I might be off-beam here, but I've often wondered about Harriet M. Welsch, in Harriet the Spy. She will only eat tomato sandwiches, she asks a lot of direct questions without caring about what others think or considering people's feelings, and she writes down all her 'spy' observations with a very scientific detachedness. And she very much relies on Ole Golly to tell her the socially correct things to do. This was my favourite book as a child, and I related to the character of Harriet quite strongly.



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06 Dec 2008, 4:54 pm

capriwim wrote:
It's years since I've read this book, so I might be off-beam here, but I've often wondered about Harriet M. Welsch, in Harriet the Spy. She will only eat tomato sandwiches, she asks a lot of direct questions without caring about what others think or considering people's feelings, and she writes down all her 'spy' observations with a very scientific detachedness. And she very much relies on Ole Golly to tell her the socially correct things to do. This was my favourite book as a child, and I related to the character of Harriet quite strongly.


Oh, I used to also really like those books! I even went through a phase where I observed people and wrote down my own "spy" observations...(but I didn´t ask them questions). After my bike was stolen, I kind of remember hanging around this one house- the house of my suspect- for hours after school, observing, and writing everything I saw. I eventually took my notebook to the police station (I dragged my little brother along, he did some of the spying with me). They read it through, and treated us like little children (well, I guess we were, but that´s not the point). They complimented us for our astute observations, but said they didn´t have enough evidence for an arrest. I was devastated! Funny, I had forgotten about that, but your post brought back that memory.


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06 Dec 2008, 5:18 pm

Morgana wrote:
Oh, I used to also really like those books! I even went through a phase where I observed people and wrote down my own "spy" observations


Yep - me too! :D I started a spy book and modelled myself on Harriet. I used to peek though holes in people's fences and write down everything I observed. And during the holidays when I was forced by my parents into social situations with other kids, I would just sit and write everything I observed about them in my spy book rather than interacting socially with them. Needless to say, they thought I was rather odd!



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07 Dec 2008, 2:46 am

Morgana wrote:
violet_yoshi wrote:

You're not familiar with Tinker Bell? She's from Peter Pan, and Disney.


Yes, I am familiar with Tinker Bell, but only in relation to Peter Pan; I don´t remember any background information abut her being a "tinkerer" (I might have just forgotten that, it´s been a long time). I never saw the Tinker Bell movie, either. I didn´t think of her before as being an Aspie; however, that makes sense, actually. But, again, she is a mythical character, rather than a "human" character. As I mentioned, I have pretty consistently related more to female mythical characters throughout my life....I wonder if that is the reason why? Is this true for other women on the spectrum- do you relate more to mythical characters: (or even to male human characters with AS traits)- as I seem to? When I watch movies about those NT stereotypes, those female characters that I´m "supposed" to want to emulate, I find I don´t want to be like them at all! So, all my life, I´ve had witches and faeries to relate to; they were always my role models! :)


isnt she a perv?



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07 Dec 2008, 5:24 am

Eggman wrote:
Morgana wrote:
violet_yoshi wrote:

You're not familiar with Tinker Bell? She's from Peter Pan, and Disney.


Yes, I am familiar with Tinker Bell, but only in relation to Peter Pan; I don´t remember any background information abut her being a "tinkerer" (I might have just forgotten that, it´s been a long time). I never saw the Tinker Bell movie, either. I didn´t think of her before as being an Aspie; however, that makes sense, actually. But, again, she is a mythical character, rather than a "human" character. As I mentioned, I have pretty consistently related more to female mythical characters throughout my life....I wonder if that is the reason why? Is this true for other women on the spectrum- do you relate more to mythical characters: (or even to male human characters with AS traits)- as I seem to? When I watch movies about those NT stereotypes, those female characters that I´m "supposed" to want to emulate, I find I don´t want to be like them at all! So, all my life, I´ve had witches and faeries to relate to; they were always my role models! :)


isnt she a perv?


:?: :?:



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07 Dec 2008, 5:26 am

Morgana wrote:
violet_yoshi wrote:

You're not familiar with Tinker Bell? She's from Peter Pan, and Disney.


Yes, I am familiar with Tinker Bell, but only in relation to Peter Pan; I don´t remember any background information abut her being a "tinkerer" (I might have just forgotten that, it´s been a long time). I never saw the Tinker Bell movie, either. I didn´t think of her before as being an Aspie; however, that makes sense, actually. But, again, she is a mythical character, rather than a "human" character. As I mentioned, I have pretty consistently related more to female mythical characters throughout my life....I wonder if that is the reason why? Is this true for other women on the spectrum- do you relate more to mythical characters: (or even to male human characters with AS traits)- as I seem to? When I watch movies about those NT stereotypes, those female characters that I´m "supposed" to want to emulate, I find I don´t want to be like them at all! So, all my life, I´ve had witches and faeries to relate to; they were always my role models! :)


It was very recently Disney decided to create a spin-off involving more about the fairies that inhabit Neverland, so it also was recent that there was a storyline explaining that Tinker Bell is a tinkerer and all of that. You really should see the movie, here's the link to it on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Tinker-Bell-Mae-W ... 572&sr=1-1



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07 Dec 2008, 10:49 am

I watched the movie "Washington Square" again, which I had posted about awhile before. It turns out it was the same movie I had seen before, and not a remake. I would say that this character (Catherine, I think her name was...God, I´m so bad with names, I just saw the movie!)- would be an example of a female Aspie, though some may relate to her more than others. I, personally, related to her a lot; particularly in her trust in people, and not understanding, or picking up the social minutia around her, to be able to see that others were up to no good. Eventually, after being betrayed by the people closest to her, there was disillusionment. I feel like I know this so well, the idealistic person who has to get used to the frailties of the human race! (I am still working on my feelings of cynicism and disillusionment, though I think it´s getting much better). What I liked so much is that she retained her Aspie qualities throughout the movie, she didn´t suddenly become "more social" or anything. There was, however, a certain dignity about her, and she became stronger somehow with age. This movie was based on a novel by Henry James; I wonder if the character in the book is written just as she is portrayed in the movie? I would be curious to find out.

It occurred to me, based on several recent threads, that there do seem to be plenty of Aspie-ish girl characters. However, what I wrote earlier seems to hold true...very few women characters! (Aside from the possibility of witches or other mythic characters). I find this fascinating, and maybe should write a paper on it. It´s as if it really is expected that the woman does become sociable, or that she ends up loving another within the framework of a relationship. I recall now that when I was a child, and reading child fiction, it was relatively easy to find role models, or people who I could relate to. Once I became a woman, that became nearly impossible. I wonder if that was why I stopped reading fiction? I became interested in movies, but again, had trouble watching all those movies in which women were portrayed so stereotypically; again, it would just drill home the message that "they´re like that" and "I´m different". Now that I know about AS, I´m watching many of those movies geared for women, that I tried to avoid before, just to learn about life.


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07 Dec 2008, 11:00 am

Morgana wrote:
I watched the movie "Washington Square" again, which I had posted about awhile before. It turns out it was the same movie I had seen before, and not a remake. I would say that this character (Catherine, I think her name was...God, I´m so bad with names, I just saw the movie!)- would be an example of a female Aspie, though some may relate to her more than others. I, personally, related to her a lot; particularly in her trust in people, and not understanding, or picking up the social minutia around her, to be able to see that others were up to no good. Eventually, after being betrayed by the people closest to her, there was disillusionment. I feel like I know this so well, the idealistic person who has to get used to the frailties of the human race! (I am still working on my feelings of cynicism and disillusionment, though I think it´s getting much better). What I liked so much is that she retained her Aspie qualities throughout the movie, she didn´t suddenly become "more social" or anything. There was, however, a certain dignity about her, and she became stronger somehow with age. This movie was based on a novel by Henry James; I wonder if the character in the book is written just as she is portrayed in the movie? I would be curious to find out.


I haven't seen the movie or read it, but I've read quite a few other novels by Henry James, and he likes to create female American characters who are very naive and trusting, and who get betrayed by Europeans. His novels tend to be comparing Americans with Europeans, and he sees America as representing innocence, and Europe as representing culture and corruption. I hadn't noticed any particularly Aspie characteristics about his characters - although they are innocent, they tend to be very subtly socially aware, and aware of all kinds of unspoken nuances. But I've read more of the later novels - maybe in his earlier novels they are more Aspie. I have wondered whether Henry James himself might have been a bit Aspie from what I've read of him. I love his novels.



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07 Dec 2008, 11:20 am

He does seem to have an obsession with disliking Europeans.



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07 Dec 2008, 11:23 am

capriwim wrote:
Morgana wrote:
I watched the movie "Washington Square" again, which I had posted about awhile before. It turns out it was the same movie I had seen before, and not a remake. I would say that this character (Catherine, I think her name was...God, I´m so bad with names, I just saw the movie!)- would be an example of a female Aspie, though some may relate to her more than others. I, personally, related to her a lot; particularly in her trust in people, and not understanding, or picking up the social minutia around her, to be able to see that others were up to no good. Eventually, after being betrayed by the people closest to her, there was disillusionment. I feel like I know this so well, the idealistic person who has to get used to the frailties of the human race! (I am still working on my feelings of cynicism and disillusionment, though I think it´s getting much better). What I liked so much is that she retained her Aspie qualities throughout the movie, she didn´t suddenly become "more social" or anything. There was, however, a certain dignity about her, and she became stronger somehow with age. This movie was based on a novel by Henry James; I wonder if the character in the book is written just as she is portrayed in the movie? I would be curious to find out.


I haven't seen the movie or read it, but I've read quite a few other novels by Henry James, and he likes to create female American characters who are very naive and trusting, and who get betrayed by Europeans. His novels tend to be comparing Americans with Europeans, and he sees America as representing innocence, and Europe as representing culture and corruption. I hadn't noticed any particularly Aspie characteristics about his characters - although they are innocent, they tend to be very subtly socially aware, and aware of all kinds of unspoken nuances. But I've read more of the later novels - maybe in his earlier novels they are more Aspie. I have wondered whether Henry James himself might have been a bit Aspie from what I've read of him. I love his novels.


If you check out the movie, she does appear Aspie, in my opinion; but I have no idea what the book is like, it could be different. In her case, I think it goes beyond just naivete, for she is also awkward socially. In this particular movie, all the characters were American, also, just all were more "social" than she was. I have read a few of his other novels when I was younger, and I found them interesting, although I don´t remember specifically any characters who I would think of as having AS.


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07 Dec 2008, 11:29 am

CockneyRebel wrote:
That one character in 'A Fish Called Wanda'

I think that there are actually at least two AS characters in that film. not just the Palin role but also Wanda's brother, who takes everything literally, doesn't know how to talk normally to anyone, is obsessed with Nietzsche, and is unable to spot sarcasm, doesn't know how to apologise, etc. And the lawyer himself has traits too.
.