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Danielismyname
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28 Nov 2008, 6:35 am

I'd say that it's not a "delay", as whilst you didn't have any words at the age of two, a half of a year later you instantly caught up to your peers (surpassed even). Well, it's probably a slight delay, but since you advanced so quickly, the slight delay was of no consequence.

I had the same thing, but I started at 4 1/2, which is a moderate delay, but nothing severe (when I started speaking, it wasn't grammatically correct, and I had the usual pronoun problems and speaking in third person). I needed speech therapy to correct this; I wouldn't have improved without such after I started talking.

I was way behind in reading and writing (the usual battery of IQ tests, what's wrong with this kid, held back grades, etcetera).



missboots
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28 Nov 2008, 12:08 pm

I didn't have a speech delay, I was always, I guess, 'advanced' in that area. But I also started reading early. My son had a speech delay, his first word was spoken at 22 months old and he didn't say another for a few months after that. Now he's at age level for how many words he can say, but he has a severe speech impediment (and has 90 minutes of speech therapy a week) and is delayed in the way he uses his speech. But he is an early reader, I noticed him recognizing words at a 28 months or so. It was once he had more words that I noticed him reading. He reads a lot now at 3. He's always coming up to my computer and sounds out the words he sees, to the best of his ability. I started reading about the same time as him.

Edit- My mom also has a speech delay (she didn't start talking till she was 5, from what I'm told) and she also apparently started reading at an early age. I guess that's why she assumed I would teach myself to read, she didn't realize you had to teach most kids to read. Luckily I was also an early reader/spontaneous reader or she'd have been royally confused! =P



Kaysea
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28 Nov 2008, 12:54 pm

neshamaruach wrote:
I remember my mother once telling me that I didn't not speak at all until I was about 2 1/2 years old, and that then I started speaking in full and complete sentences. Does anyone else have this sort of history? Does this qualify as a speech delay? On the one hand, I was not speaking at all by age 2, but on the other hand, it sounds like I was saving it up until I could put a sentence together and converse properly with the adults. (I was the first child in my whole extended family.)



I'm not sure if I had any significant delays in the context of speech. But what you mentioned here is essentially my learning process for anything. I struggle and struggle, then I have it. This is probably due to the fact that it has always seemed counter-intuitive to think that you have to learn all of the smaller parts of something before make an attempt to achieve the higher-level, end result. If I want to be able to do something, I just go for it, and beat my head off the wall until it finally clicks.

I do know that, by the time I started kindergarten, I was reading on, at least, a junior high level and was talking over my teacher's head a lot of the time. I also hated library class/story time due to the mindless nature of the material being read and the fact that, for a long time, I was only allowed to read books off the blue shelves - the ones with only one or two sentences per page. Finally (at the request of my parents?) I was allowed to get science and history books from the highschool side of the library, which were much more enjoyable.

For that matter, I never understood the point of fiction until I was about 17 (first came John Jakes works of historical fiction, then I discovered Vonnegut, Kafka, Delaney and the like). I didn't understand why one would take the time to read, and, for that matter, write about something that wasn't 'real.'



mosez
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28 Nov 2008, 6:00 pm

I was reading the newspaper when I started at schoool. Did not see the point of everyone struggeling with the alphabeth, etc..Got expelled from the first grade, due to immature behaviour. But I could read and write, at the age of five, why? Nobody knows. The school killed me somehow.


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Odd_Duck
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28 Nov 2008, 6:53 pm

neshamaruach wrote:
I remember my mother once telling me that I didn't not speak at all until I was about 2 1/2 years old, and that then I started speaking in full and complete sentences. Does anyone else have this sort of history?


Pretty much describes my history too. Interestingly, around that same time when my parents wanted to make a recording of me saying my ABCs, they needed to write them out and have me read them out since I couldn't recite them or sing the ABC song from memory. Nobody thought much of that at the time. My mother was later castigated for teaching me things (like reading) at home, since I was bored in school with nothing new to learn! How's that for a supportive educational environment?

All of this pretty much describes my brother in law, who also demonstrates Aspie traits.

Cheers!


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matrixluver
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28 Nov 2008, 11:04 pm

but it makes sense that you would read early, people with ASD are of course visual people by nature. I was speaking in phrases before my first birthday and I basically taught myself to read before I went to Kindergarten.