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JohnnyTwoTones
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13 Sep 2020, 8:15 pm

Hi

I've been recently diagnosed as being what used to be considered high functioning. I'm married with 2 kids and am not quite sure how to handle it. Completely took me off guard. Any advice?



Lunella
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13 Sep 2020, 8:19 pm

You're not the condition, you are you with some differences and you can learn how to deal with it to best suit you if there are any issues. There are plenty of high functioning people with families and jobs and being diagnosed certainly doesn't mean you're in any kind of trouble. You just found out why you're a bit different is all so don't panic.

If you're struggling with something find a work-around or figure out how to act.


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ASPartOfMe
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14 Sep 2020, 3:07 am

Welcome to Wrong Planet

You need to have patience as finding out something new about yourself well into adulthood is confusing.

The first thing is to find out about the condition.

An Adult with an Autism Diagnosis: A Guide for the Newly Diagnosed

Quote:
Being diagnosed with autism as an adult can be disorienting and isolating; however, if you can understand the condition and how it affects perceptions, relationships, and your relationship with the world in general, a happy and successful life is attainable. Through an introduction to the autism spectrum, and how the Level 1 diagnosis is characterised, the author draws on personal experiences to provide positive advice on dealing with life, health, and relationships following an adult diagnosis.

The effect of autism on social skills is described with tips for dealing with family and personal relationships, parenting, living arrangements, and employment. Important topics include disclosure, available resources, and options for different therapeutic routes. On reading this book, you will learn a lot more about the autism spectrum at Level 1, be able to separate the facts from the myths, and gain an appreciation of the strengths of autism, and how autism can affect many aspects of everyday life. Drawing from the author's lived experience, this book is an essential guide for all newly diagnosed adults on the autism spectrum,


"The Complete Guide to Aspergers Syndrome" by Tony Attwood is often recommended. Even though "Aspergers Syndrome" is not a diagnosis anymore the term still used to describe a form of high functioning autism


And do not be afraid to ask "stupid" questions here.


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JohnnyTwoTones
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16 Sep 2020, 1:15 pm

Thank you. I just purchased the book. Let's see what it says.



Minuteman
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16 Sep 2020, 2:43 pm

I was diagnosed at 53. After that, a lot of things that happened in my past made a lot of sense (inability to make friends, rigidity, need for structure). Basically, it allowed me to realize I wasn't weird -- there's a reason why I act this way, and it actually gave me a sense of peace.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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16 Sep 2020, 10:27 pm

For example, sensory issues . . .

The fact that other people aren’t as bothered by the buzz of a fluorescent light (or the stench of cleaning chemicals) doesn’t mean they’re a bunch of conformist fools. They’re just wired up differently than I am.

Oh, that kind of changes things.

Yes, it does. And I think it’s potentially one example of the many benefits of greater self-knowledge and knowledge of others.

And, welcome to WrongPlanet! :jester: