Page 1 of 1 [ 15 posts ] 

Mountaineer
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jun 2013
Age: 60
Gender: Male
Posts: 1

25 Jun 2013, 8:41 pm

I have not been diagnosed, but I am sure I must have Aspergers. I lost a job with no ideas of why until I read a few books on Aspergers and I now can understand why he let me go. Should I share my Aspergers with my new company and/or boss?



cathylynn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Aug 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 13,035
Location: northeast US

25 Jun 2013, 9:20 pm

I haven't shared mine with my boss. it would be too easily used against me.



smarvin
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 23 Jun 2013
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 6

25 Jun 2013, 9:54 pm

I wouldn't. I personally don't share it with anyone but those closest to me and I would least of all want my work to know.



Hermier
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jan 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Female
Posts: 314
Location: Cyberspace, USA

25 Jun 2013, 10:20 pm

I agree.

However, you might be open with the new employers about some of your specific challenges related to Aspergers, as they would affect your work. This, I think, is less likely to make them see you as "Other" - it's typically good to fit in, if possible, at work. Most work.



pi_woman
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 15 May 2006
Age: 59
Gender: Female
Posts: 301
Location: In my own little world

26 Jun 2013, 12:47 pm

I shared my diagnosis on my boss' first day by means of a "soft disclosure" info sheet, designed to help him manage by giving him advance notice of typical AS issues in the workplace. Without going into great detail about AS symptoms (I included a small bibliography for further information).

It depends on how much you think you can trust your boss to use the information professionally. I suspected that my boss would gossip about this to the other managers, but decided that would help more than hurt because that way everyone knows why I'm different without my having to tell them (which could appear to be looking for attention).

If you do tell, I'd advise you to focus on how it affects your work performance. There's a site called the Job Accomodation Network that lists typical AS issues your employer is required to accommodate under the Americans with Disabilities Act. You should read it for your own protection, but don't show it to your boss unless he asks for details (or he might think you're going to take legal action): http://askjan.org/media/ASD.



Halligeninseln
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 22 Sep 2011
Age: 68
Gender: Male
Posts: 382
Location: Central Europe

27 Jun 2013, 4:39 pm

I haven't told anyone at work, even though (or perhaps exactly because) the AS directly affects my work performance in many ways. It is frustrating at times to know (officially) the reason why certain things are difficult and to even sometimes to be able to force accomodations to the way I am and yet not to be able to explain to anyone there why exactly I am the way I am and have the problems I do in some areas, but I think it would be disastrous to mention AS or autism or anything like that at work.. They would just assume that I am defective and unable to do my job. At the moment my limitations are just seen as personal limitations and nothing more and I think that is easier for people to accept than a concretely named disorder.



neilson_wheels
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,404
Location: London, Capital of the Un-United Kingdom

02 Jul 2013, 3:12 am

No, spend time on developing coping strategies.



Jensen
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Feb 2013
Age: 68
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,011
Location: Denmark

03 Jul 2013, 8:22 am

I just started a new work trial at a hospital, working with journals, - and that is very OK, - but I am very nervous and easily confused. They are very, very nice people and very understanding towards each other and towards beginners.
The problem is, that they are not given the time to show me the ropes at my "speed", - in other words, I am very nervous and confused just by the thought of being too slow, - actually rather shaky. I need an explanation for every single abbrevation and the route of each paper in a logical language (Only one name for each thing, please! ) - and I can tell, that there is no time for that.
I have to write everything down in order to remember and I prefer to learn as much as possible via the computer..
(Also, it seems, that I will probably run into every single physical challenge, that is no-no, according to my papers).

I fear, that my need for rigid order in the learning-process and my easily getting confused make them think, that I am odd/stupid.
Maybe the person guiding me already has me figured out.
If the problems persist, - should I then tell her about my "aspie-adhd-light"?


_________________
Femaline
Special Interest: Beethoven


KeAil
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 5 Jul 2013
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 8

07 Jul 2013, 5:05 pm

If your job is at risk, then see your consultant, explain the situation, then tell your manager you have just had it confirmed hence didn't mention it before.



Jensen
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Feb 2013
Age: 68
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,011
Location: Denmark

07 Jul 2013, 5:38 pm

I don´t know if your answer is for me, - but my consultant knows, and when I was called in for a chat with the boss, I told, that I most probably have aspergers and that I am being evaluated.
"That makes sense", she said.
Right now I am allowed to learn things by routine-routine and a little new stuff at a time.
I am sure that I´ll move faster once I let go of my nervousness.
A positive result, I must say, - but a little weird.
I´ve never experienced the "special-consideration" situation before.


_________________
Femaline
Special Interest: Beethoven


CaroleTucson
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Aug 2009
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 824
Location: Tucson, AZ

08 Jul 2013, 10:54 am

My opinion is "no". The way I see it, it's no one's business, and it will forever change the way your employer and co-workers interact with you. That's assuming they even have a clue what Asperger's is. It's entirely possible they will see it as some sort of mental illness, and shun you.

Perhaps I'm being overly harsh, and it would work out fine. But at the least, I'd be very, very careful about it.



Tohlagos
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 853
Location: Kentucky

08 Jul 2013, 11:55 am

CaroleTucson wrote:
My opinion is "no". The way I see it, it's no one's business, and it will forever change the way your employer and co-workers interact with you. That's assuming they even have a clue what Asperger's is. It's entirely possible they will see it as some sort of mental illness, and shun you.



I completely agree.

Groups of people usually try to find the "weakest link" in the group and focus their negativity on them.

From my experiences of telling people who don't love/care about you, it is like putting a bullseye on your chest and saying "shoot me."

Also if you tell someone who does care about you, you don't know how they will react. They may go read up on AS on their own, but read things realted to criminals with AS, or just negative things. I am not trying to be paranoid here, but once that line is crossed, once that cat is out of the bag, you can't go back.

Your talking about not just your job here, but your life. It is precious to you, guard it.



ablomov
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jul 2008
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 406
Location: northern hemisphere

08 Jul 2013, 12:09 pm

NO NO NO.



Webalina
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Age: 62
Gender: Female
Posts: 787
Location: Piney Woods of East Texas

30 Jul 2013, 12:01 am

Nope.

Because you haven't been diagnosed, the boss would possibly try to use it as a way to get rid of you. That happened to me with my Panic Disorder. I was getting some bad reviews at work, so I thought I should share my problems with my boss, who I thought was a good guy who liked me. He responded by finding fault with my work and firing me. One other person got fired that day -- a guy with a bum leg who spent a lot of time out of the office at doctor's appointments.

If you feel you have to share it with someone, you might be able to tell your human resources department, if your company has one. They understand the disability laws and know what they can hold against you and what they can't. After all, Asperger's IS considered a disability. But without an official diagnosis, I'm afraid it might not help you to use AS as a defense.



loveturn
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2013
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 60
Location: Netherlands

31 Jul 2013, 5:14 am

I don't know. I believe it's the best thing not to tell that you have Aspergers (which you don't even know you have, why won't you go for a official diagnoses?). BUT. I am starting my internship in September with a company and I already feel guilty that I haven't told them about it. It feels like lying and I don't like that.