Consumer law attorneys / for major consumer transactions?

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JustFoundHere
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11 Nov 2021, 4:24 pm

Anybody experienced with consumer law attorneys who act a third-parties who are present to negotiated motor-vehicle transactions?

What about attorneys specializing in the legalities of property law - example: rental property issues?

The purpose is enlist legal services to avoid difficulties down the road - to be proactive, and avoid difficulties which end-up costing the most in the end!

Remember, even NTs sometimes need third parties to act on their behalf in an ever more confusing, complex world!



Blue_Star
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27 Nov 2021, 1:51 pm

Using a lawyer for residential real property transactions is only common in some areas. Here, it'd be rather weird for buying or selling a regular house. And I'm not sure a car sales lot would be pleased with a customer bringing one either. One would likely do better by asking friends or locals for recommendations of good real estate agents or car salesmen. Or take along a friend who has been thru the processes before.

Sometimes the only protection is simply to read everything & make sure one understands it. I've been the person brought along to go over contracts, only because I'm thorough & will ask about all the things that seem vague.

Remember, most people buy cars, houses, & so on without huge issues down the road. The vast majority of the time, the issues that do arise should be the more common types, which friends & agents should be able to help with just fine w/o need for a lawyer in the mix.



JustFoundHere
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01 Dec 2021, 2:53 pm

Blue_Star wrote:
Using a lawyer for residential real property transactions is only common in some areas. Here, it'd be rather weird for buying or selling a regular house. And I'm not sure a car sales lot would be pleased with a customer bringing one either. One would likely do better by asking friends or locals for recommendations of good real estate agents or car salesmen. Or take along a friend who has been thru the processes before.

Sometimes the only protection is simply to read everything & make sure one understands it. I've been the person brought along to go over contracts, only because I'm thorough & will ask about all the things that seem vague.

Remember, most people buy cars, houses, & so on without huge issues down the road. The vast majority of the time, the issues that do arise should be the more common types, which friends & agents should be able to help with just fine w/o need for a lawyer in the mix.


Did you act as a third-party for a person on the Autism Spectrum? What is your experience with adults on the Autism Spectrum are largely independent?

By the very nature of the Autism Spectrum, friendships are elusive. Family friends, and trusted relatives are fine.....to a point - hence why I feel it's necessary to enlist professional services to act as third-parties instead.

I am aware of a region where it's common to enlist attorneys for property transactions. I've visited relatives in the New England Region. Our relatives seemed somewhat surprised that we here in CA. usually don't consider attorneys for property transactions.

As for transactions relating to the purchase of pre-owned vehicles, I would prefer a savvy consumer person (who's not a consumer law) attorney - yet such a third party is elusive to find.

Can independent living resource centers whose support comes from that mix of non-profit, and govt. funding play roles in enlisting staff to assist as third-parties in major consumer transactions?



Nades
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03 Dec 2021, 9:12 am

JustFoundHere wrote:
Blue_Star wrote:
Using a lawyer for residential real property transactions is only common in some areas. Here, it'd be rather weird for buying or selling a regular house. And I'm not sure a car sales lot would be pleased with a customer bringing one either. One would likely do better by asking friends or locals for recommendations of good real estate agents or car salesmen. Or take along a friend who has been thru the processes before.

Sometimes the only protection is simply to read everything & make sure one understands it. I've been the person brought along to go over contracts, only because I'm thorough & will ask about all the things that seem vague.

Remember, most people buy cars, houses, & so on without huge issues down the road. The vast majority of the time, the issues that do arise should be the more common types, which friends & agents should be able to help with just fine w/o need for a lawyer in the mix.


Did you act as a third-party for a person on the Autism Spectrum? What is your experience with adults on the Autism Spectrum are largely independent?

By the very nature of the Autism Spectrum, friendships are elusive. Family friends, and trusted relatives are fine.....to a point - hence why I feel it's necessary to enlist professional services to act as third-parties instead.

I am aware of a region where it's common to enlist attorneys for property transactions. I've visited relatives in the New England Region. Our relatives seemed somewhat surprised that we here in CA. usually don't consider attorneys for property transactions.

As for transactions relating to the purchase of pre-owned vehicles, I would prefer a savvy consumer person (who's not a consumer law) attorney - yet such a third party is elusive to find.

Can independent living resource centers whose support comes from that mix of non-profit, and govt. funding play roles in enlisting staff to assist as third-parties in major consumer transactions?


Both quotes are interesting. Here in the UK it's mandatory to use a property solicitor when buying a house provided it's mortgaged. The banks will refuse a mortgage if they find out you're trying to complete the transaction without a solicitor.

The risks reduces the more minor the purchase. If you're buying a company or a house then you should always use a lawyer. It's impressive the issues that can show up in a house purchase. Some of the problems I've encountered buying houses are :-

- Power of attorney forms written using incorrect legislation when selling a house on behalf of a no longer lucid seller.
-identity problems with the seller.
-bondary problems with slightly misplaced mapping
-solicitor confirming my identity
-inventory checks wrong
-flooding risk
-subsidence risk (a lot of mines in the area)

The devil's in the detail and if something is wrong and not sorted prior to sale (power of attorney forms for example) then you're up s**t creek without a paddle if the land registry catches wind.

Autism will make someone more vulnerable to a scammy scumbag or just being sold something by dim witted people who haven't got everything in order prior to sale. The risks get bigger the more expensive the purchase and the risk gets bigger the worse your autism.

Look at the type of purchase before hand. Look at the risks and losses that might be incurred and think "will someone with poor social skills be a target?" If it's yes then get help.



Texasmoneyman300
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05 Dec 2021, 1:58 am

JustFoundHere wrote:
Anybody experienced with consumer law attorneys who act a third-parties who are present to negotiated motor-vehicle transactions?

What about attorneys specializing in the legalities of property law - example: rental property issues?

The purpose is enlist legal services to avoid difficulties down the road - to be proactive, and avoid difficulties which end-up costing the most in the end!

Remember, even NTs sometimes need third parties to act on their behalf in an ever more confusing, complex world!

pretty much everyone NTs and aspies alike need lawyers when it comes to oil and gas mineral rights law which is a kind of property law dealing with oilfield real estate for drilling rights.



JustFoundHere
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05 Dec 2021, 3:03 pm

Nades wrote:
JustFoundHere wrote:
Blue_Star wrote:
Using a lawyer for residential real property transactions is only common in some areas. Here, it'd be rather weird for buying or selling a regular house. And I'm not sure a car sales lot would be pleased with a customer bringing one either. One would likely do better by asking friends or locals for recommendations of good real estate agents or car salesmen. Or take along a friend who has been thru the processes before.

Sometimes the only protection is simply to read everything & make sure one understands it. I've been the person brought along to go over contracts, only because I'm thorough & will ask about all the things that seem vague.

Remember, most people buy cars, houses, & so on without huge issues down the road. The vast majority of the time, the issues that do arise should be the more common types, which friends & agents should be able to help with just fine w/o need for a lawyer in the mix.


Did you act as a third-party for a person on the Autism Spectrum? What is your experience with adults on the Autism Spectrum are largely independent?

By the very nature of the Autism Spectrum, friendships are elusive. Family friends, and trusted relatives are fine.....to a point - hence why I feel it's necessary to enlist professional services to act as third-parties instead.

I am aware of a region where it's common to enlist attorneys for property transactions. I've visited relatives in the New England Region. Our relatives seemed somewhat surprised that we here in CA. usually don't consider attorneys for property transactions.

As for transactions relating to the purchase of pre-owned vehicles, I would prefer a savvy consumer person (who's not a consumer law) attorney - yet such a third party is elusive to find.

Can independent living resource centers whose support comes from that mix of non-profit, and govt. funding play roles in enlisting staff to assist as third-parties in major consumer transactions?


Both quotes are interesting. Here in the UK it's mandatory to use a property solicitor when buying a house provided it's mortgaged. The banks will refuse a mortgage if they find out you're trying to complete the transaction without a solicitor.

The risks reduces the more minor the purchase. If you're buying a company or a house then you should always use a lawyer. It's impressive the issues that can show up in a house purchase. Some of the problems I've encountered buying houses are :-

- Power of attorney forms written using incorrect legislation when selling a house on behalf of a no longer lucid seller.
-identity problems with the seller.
-bondary problems with slightly misplaced mapping
-solicitor confirming my identity
-inventory checks wrong
-flooding risk
-subsidence risk (a lot of mines in the area)

The devil's in the detail and if something is wrong and not sorted prior to sale (power of attorney forms for example) then you're up s**t creek without a paddle if the land registry catches wind.

Autism will make someone more vulnerable to a scammy scumbag or just being sold something by dim witted people who haven't got everything in order prior to sale. The risks get bigger the more expensive the purchase and the risk gets bigger the worse your autism.

Look at the type of purchase before hand. Look at the risks and losses that might be incurred and think "will someone with poor social skills be a target?" If it's yes then get help.


To refocus: Might third-party support be in the loop for any rental/lease issues which may crop up?



Nades
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05 Dec 2021, 3:37 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
Nades wrote:
JustFoundHere wrote:
Blue_Star wrote:
Using a lawyer for residential real property transactions is only common in some areas. Here, it'd be rather weird for buying or selling a regular house. And I'm not sure a car sales lot would be pleased with a customer bringing one either. One would likely do better by asking friends or locals for recommendations of good real estate agents or car salesmen. Or take along a friend who has been thru the processes before.

Sometimes the only protection is simply to read everything & make sure one understands it. I've been the person brought along to go over contracts, only because I'm thorough & will ask about all the things that seem vague.

Remember, most people buy cars, houses, & so on without huge issues down the road. The vast majority of the time, the issues that do arise should be the more common types, which friends & agents should be able to help with just fine w/o need for a lawyer in the mix.


Did you act as a third-party for a person on the Autism Spectrum? What is your experience with adults on the Autism Spectrum are largely independent?

By the very nature of the Autism Spectrum, friendships are elusive. Family friends, and trusted relatives are fine.....to a point - hence why I feel it's necessary to enlist professional services to act as third-parties instead.

I am aware of a region where it's common to enlist attorneys for property transactions. I've visited relatives in the New England Region. Our relatives seemed somewhat surprised that we here in CA. usually don't consider attorneys for property transactions.

As for transactions relating to the purchase of pre-owned vehicles, I would prefer a savvy consumer person (who's not a consumer law) attorney - yet such a third party is elusive to find.

Can independent living resource centers whose support comes from that mix of non-profit, and govt. funding play roles in enlisting staff to assist as third-parties in major consumer transactions?


Both quotes are interesting. Here in the UK it's mandatory to use a property solicitor when buying a house provided it's mortgaged. The banks will refuse a mortgage if they find out you're trying to complete the transaction without a solicitor.

The risks reduces the more minor the purchase. If you're buying a company or a house then you should always use a lawyer. It's impressive the issues that can show up in a house purchase. Some of the problems I've encountered buying houses are :-

- Power of attorney forms written using incorrect legislation when selling a house on behalf of a no longer lucid seller.
-identity problems with the seller.
-bondary problems with slightly misplaced mapping
-solicitor confirming my identity
-inventory checks wrong
-flooding risk
-subsidence risk (a lot of mines in the area)

The devil's in the detail and if something is wrong and not sorted prior to sale (power of attorney forms for example) then you're up s**t creek without a paddle if the land registry catches wind.

Autism will make someone more vulnerable to a scammy scumbag or just being sold something by dim witted people who haven't got everything in order prior to sale. The risks get bigger the more expensive the purchase and the risk gets bigger the worse your autism.

Look at the type of purchase before hand. Look at the risks and losses that might be incurred and think "will someone with poor social skills be a target?" If it's yes then get help.


To refocus: Might third-party support be in the loop for any rental/lease issues which may crop up?


If by third party you mean solicitors/lawyers then yes, those professionals will be as in the loop as can possibly be. It is their legal obligation to behave impartially, in keeping with current laws and in the best interests of their clients.

Leases and rentals are different to purchases. As a whole, leases are rentals are far safer and even very dodgy contracts you sign can be repealed by the robust laws in your country. A landlord is wrong in assuming he can write whatever he likes in a tenancy agreement. Whatever he makes you sign needs to comply with tenancy laws which are usually strict in western nations and by default have your interests taken into account. Generally speaking, you'll be safe singing a tenancy agreement without a lawyer and in most cases the laws are designed to ensure you're safe in such cases as it's not expected of tenants to consult a lawyer anyway.

When it comes to buying however.....

There was some advice I was given by a very wealthy man in the past. To paraphrase him, the said if you think professional legal advice is expensive (solicitors/lawyers/accountants) then the cost of free legal advice is unbelievable.

Looking back at my previous transactions, the free advice I was given from my dad and mother was terrible and completely wrong. I'm glad I ignored them and asked the accountants and solicitors before I proceeded with expensive purchases or flip flopping deeds. Just because you trust the person giving the advice doesn't mean you should trust the advice itself.

I've asked solicitors and accountants so often that my parents are starting to ask me for financial advice instead. Noit only that, but I learned a lot myself from them.

The risks reduce the more minor the purchase and the risks increase the worse your ASD. Scum bags are always looking for people with poor social skills to flog their crap to. If you feel you might be taken advantage of then get some professional advice. If you're buying a second hand car, take a mechanic with you if possible. If you're buying a house, a chartered surveyor and solicitor is wise. Bad people can only sell to the gullible and autistics are gullible.

Use common sense though. If it's a purchase of a few hundred then a lawyer might be a little bit perplexed as to why you asked him/her to help.