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firemonkey
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30 Jul 2021, 2:29 am

The concept of ‘neurodiversity’ has gained enormous cultural influence in recent years. Computer scientists and ‘techies’ wear the ‘neurodiverse’ label with pride; businesses are building ‘neurodiverse’ workforces; scriptwriters strive to represent and cast ‘neurodivergent’ people. Those framed as ‘different’ have been given a remarkable new lens through which to reimagine that variance.

The sociologist Judy Singer coined the term ‘neurodiversity’ in the late 1990s. Inspired by other emancipatory social movements based on race and gender, Singer used her standing as an autistic person to rally together neurodivergent people. This was partly a response to what Singer called the ‘social constructivist’ view of autism, where the condition was seen as having no solid biological basis. This denied the reality of neurological difference, according to Singer. In reply, she offered up ‘neurodiversity’ in the spirit of biodiversity, in that it recognised and respected natural variance among humans.

The movement quickly gained support via online forums and new social networks. Since Singer’s first use of the term, neurodiversity has widened beyond autism to include people who identify with categories such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, bipolar disorder, depression and more. It’s come to mean any real mental differences – neither choices nor simply illnesses – that aren’t problems to solve so much as enrichments for society. Neurodiversity has done brilliant work in breaking down social barriers, challenging stigmas, and raising awareness. But it also contains limitations, and these are becoming increasingly prominent as the concept expands into new domains.

https://aeon.co/essays/neurodiversity-i ... e=rss-feed


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
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carlos55
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30 Jul 2021, 9:21 am

Was a very long read to be honest skim read through much of it, overly long & allot of useless psychobabble.

Maybe the author just wants to create their own movement & call it something else, but at least they recognise the problems with ND so can be commended for that.



firemonkey
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30 Jul 2021, 9:51 am

I think it's a case of someone being good/very good in one area thinking that automatically transfers to other areas. It's happening more and more.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Mona Pereth
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30 Jul 2021, 1:47 pm

I'm a bit confused as to exactly what the author is trying to advocate. If, by "psydiversity," she just means being more accepting of people's idiosyncrasies regardless of whether they are rooted in innate brain biology, then I agree.


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