Very Early Intervention therapy said to be “breakthrough”

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Edna3362
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23 Sep 2021, 4:51 am

I'd rather have science figure how to prevent the ever plauging anxiety disorders, and possible 'regression' through autistic burnouts instead.


A lot of school aged autism diagnosis is prompted by some form of behavior disrupting anxiety or burnout.
Childhood burnouts exists, diagnosis criteria or not.


If communication, language, speech delay and other delay in milestones wasn't noticed first nor happened at earlier time -- before school age... Burnout will in any point of time after.

It'll either be the senses, socialization and repetitive behaviors exacerbated by anxiety and other mental health issues -- if burnout didn't happen first.


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ASPartOfMe
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23 Sep 2021, 9:06 am

Be it ABA or this therapy the hidden agenda is to cure or recovering.

It is known that various therapies can “rewire” brain circuitry. It is also known that in the first few years of life especially in infancy is when the majority of brain wiring that makes you, you occurs. IMHO the idea behind this tremendous push for extremely early intervention is to have the therapy cut off or deflect the genetic instructions to make a person autistic before the person becomes autistic.

I understand and agree with skepticism that this can be done, so many different genes, way too young determine if a person will become autistic etc. However I would not assume and become complacent. There is so much time effort and money being thrown at these early interventions why assume with all this will there won’t be a way?. I am not fooled by the failure to mention cure. Mentioning cure is bad branding in this era. A lot acceptance claims are diversity virtue signaling. If not it is a coping mechanism. I will say it again not meeting the diagnostic criteria is a more politically correct way of saying cure. For now the diagnosis is based on observed behaviors. If ones behaviors does meet the behavioral criteria anymore under todays understanding you are cured. Expecting the way to diagnose autism changes is a hope and hypothetical.

I do not need to explain why ND movement supporters should fear an actual cure being found. The widespread belief that one can not be found is no reason to become complacent because the harm that will be done by action done under the false belief autistics can be cured is incalculable.


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magz
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23 Sep 2021, 10:02 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
I will say it again not meeting the diagnostic criteria is a more politically correct way of saying cure. For now the diagnosis is based on observed behaviors. If ones behaviors does meet the behavioral criteria anymore under todays understanding you are cured. Expecting the way to diagnose autism changes is a hope and hypothetical.
How about the growing body of identified "masking" ASD individuals, not meeting the behavioral criteria at a cost of long-term mental health?
It's being actively researched so I don't think updating the criteria to include them is "a hope and hypothetical".


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23 Sep 2021, 10:31 am

magz wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
I will say it again not meeting the diagnostic criteria is a more politically correct way of saying cure. For now the diagnosis is based on observed behaviors. If ones behaviors does meet the behavioral criteria anymore under todays understanding you are cured. Expecting the way to diagnose autism changes is a hope and hypothetical.
How about the growing body of identified "masking" ASD individuals, not meeting the behavioral criteria at a cost of long-term mental health?
It's being actively researched so I don't think updating the criteria to include them is "a hope and hypothetical".

If or until the basis of diagnosing autism changes it is a hypothetical. I hope someday it will become reality. Right now the “masking” is a theory gaining traction. Because I believe in that theory does not necessarily make it a fact. Theoretically a good diagnostician will pick it up. Hiding of covering up behaviors is not unique to autism, for instance alcoholics will hide their drinks or say they are a social drinker.


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23 Sep 2021, 12:10 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
A lot acceptance claims are diversity virtue signaling. If not it is a coping mechanism. I will say it again not meeting the diagnostic criteria is a more politically correct way of saying cure. For now the diagnosis is based on observed behaviors. If ones behaviors does meet the behavioral criteria anymore under todays understanding you are cured.


Agree. I believe prevention, treatment or cure will bring things to a conclusion on the way society deals with autism.

Which will be a good thing some real debate not the BS lies and semantics going on now by all sides especially NTs.


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23 Sep 2021, 12:55 pm

this study was done on only a few individuals, half of whom did not use the "treatment" plan. These were "at risk of autism" infants, and it is very likely that the "not autistic" response at the end of the test was not due to the treatment but because the infants were not born autistic to begin with. I think this is a very flawed study with very few participants which means the statistical 'evidence' gathered is next to useless. Unless follow up studies of several hundred or a thousand can be repeated one or two times more with identical results, the information being touted as a breakthrough is actually useless.



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23 Sep 2021, 2:42 pm

autisticelders wrote:
this study was done on only a few individuals, half of whom did not use the "treatment" plan. These were "at risk of autism" infants, and it is very likely that the "not autistic" response at the end of the test was not due to the treatment but because the infants were not born autistic to begin with. I think this is a very flawed study with very few participants which means the statistical 'evidence' gathered is next to useless. Unless follow up studies of several hundred or a thousand can be repeated one or two times more with identical results, the information being touted as a breakthrough is actually useless.


Scientists are usually very conservative & cautious in their language. If they report something that gets printed all over the world there is probably something in it.

Not that early intervention to prevent autism was a new wacky idea not touted and recommended by experts anyway.

Maybe your right maybe your wrong, maybe vaccines cause autism, maybe big foot is real & global warming & COVID is a hoax.

Truth is what the experts say it is & the official position of your government & health authorities.

Truth says early intervention works now they have evidence, so ABA will use that and most people will listen & pay.


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24 Sep 2021, 12:52 am

magz wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
"Autism is not caused by bad parenting - it's mainly genetic - but parents can help reduce impact of autism on their children."


Yeah but its too easy? this reminds me of i-pad apps that are supposed to reduce ADHD in infants that uses games. As a parent if I give my daughter a device and increase the screentime she's allowed to play video games doesn't do the same thing.

This intervention sounds like ABA + spending more time talking to your kids. I'm very suspicious.



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24 Sep 2021, 12:54 am

carlos55 wrote:
Agree. I believe prevention, treatment or cure will bring things to a conclusion on the way society deals with autism.

Which will be a good thing some real debate not the BS lies and semantics going on now by all sides especially NT health professionals who pocket hard working parent's money to buy membership to country clubs and expensive cars.


Fixed it for you.



magz
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24 Sep 2021, 2:15 am

cyberdad wrote:
This intervention sounds like ABA + spending more time talking to your kids. I'm very suspicious.
I think we can test if using only the second part would work as well ;)


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24 Sep 2021, 3:56 am

My current conversation with my 16 yr old daughter 5 minutes ago was....

So cybergirl, how was your walk,
"oh it rained",
Are you going to help mum with chores?
"hey dad, have you ever considered wearing deer horns in public"?

hmmm what could I have done differently?



magz
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24 Sep 2021, 4:14 am

cyberdad wrote:
"hey dad, have you ever considered wearing deer horns in public"?
Is she trying to tell you something? :chin:

Talking with teenage children is an art on its own. I haven't been there yet personally so I wouldn't pretend to know.

So far, active listening has worked for me with all ages. Sometimes, with some autistic people from my family and close friends, it's more about active drawing...


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cyberdad
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24 Sep 2021, 4:27 am

Its funny, I've been teaching my daughter active listening, I'm pretty sure I don't do it myself :lol:

My wife says first start with yourself, then go back try cybergirl



magz
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24 Sep 2021, 5:46 am

cyberdad wrote:
Its funny, I've been teaching my daughter active listening, I'm pretty sure I don't do it myself :lol:

My wife says first start with yourself, then go back try cybergirl
That's how my mom failed to teach me to keep my place clean...


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24 Sep 2021, 8:29 am

Uncertainty clouds test of ‘preemptive’ therapy to ease autism traits

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Headlines this week hailed a behavioral therapy that parents can deliver to their babies to lessen the intensity of the children’s autism traits and lower their chances of a diagnosis at age 3, but independent experts urge caution: The observed effects were small, and the study’s analysis raises questions about whether its findings will withstand replication.

“Even given the less-than-optimal statistical analyses and weaker-than-ideal outcomes, this is important, relevant and timely work,” says April Benasich, professor of developmental cognitive neuroscience at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey, who was not involved in the research.

The study is a follow-up to a 2019 single-blind randomized controlled trial involving 103 babies who showed behavioral signs of autism at 9 to 14 months of age. Six months later, babies who had received the experimental therapy fared no differently than controls on a measure of autism traits.

In the new work, the same team followed 89 of the children to age 3. By then, 12 had been diagnosed with autism, and those in the control group, who had not received the experimental therapy, were three times as likely as those who had to meet diagnostic criteria for the condition, the study shows. The work appeared on Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

Guiding interactions:
The children in the study all screened positive for signs of autism on the Social Attention and Communication Surveillance-Revised measure at 9 to 14 months old. The tool is most accurate when administered several times, but many children take it only once before being referred to a specialist or not, says lead researcher Andrew Whitehouse, professor of autism research at the Telethon Kids Institute in Western Australia.

The parents of 50 babies learned to deliver the experimental therapy, called iBASIS-Video Interaction to Promote Positive Parenting (iBASIS-VIPP). During 10 biweekly sessions, the parents watched videos of their own interactions with their child, while a trained therapist offered them communication tips. The parents practiced their skills with their children for at least 15 minutes a day over the original five-month study period. The parents of another 53 children did not receive any training, but some received other therapies elsewhere.

The new work reassessed autism traits among 44 children from the control group and 45 children in the treatment group at ages 2 and 3, using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). Clinicians also evaluated the children for autism at age 3.

Those whose parents had gone through training showed less pronounced autism traits than controls, when measured across the time period of 12 months to 3 years old. And three children in the treatment group received an autism diagnosis, compared with nine controls.

“The children falling below the diagnostic threshold still had developmental difficulties,” Whitehouse says. “However, what this study showed was that by working with each child’s unique differences, rather than trying to counter them, iBASIS-VIPP therapy has effectively supported their development throughout the early childhood years.”

Ethical issues:
But the choice of a one-tailed test rather than a more stringent two-tailed one — which accounts for the possibility that a treatment may be either more or less effective than treatment as usual — boosted the odds that the findings would be statistically significant, Benasich says.

“That analytical choice precludes the opportunity to explore an effect in the other direction and, given the weak statistical results at one-tailed level, the likelihood is that the two-tailed results would not or did not reach significance,” Benasich says

The small number of participants also lessens confidence in the findings, says Regina Nuzzo, senior advisor for statistics communication at the American Statistical Association, who was not involved in the study.

But the premise of the study — what Bottema-Beutel calls a preemptive intervention to keep people from becoming autistic — raises ethical concerns, she says. “Many autistic traits are just differences, they’re not necessarily something that’s going to make it more difficult for you to achieve developmental milestones.”

The team is sensitive to this concern, Whitehouse says.


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24 Sep 2021, 1:21 pm

Something that's confused me is why neurotypical parents don't already try adjusting the ways they communicate and interact with their autistic children. It's just odd to me how we're the ones with the inability to figure out how to communicate and interact "properly", when neurotypical parents can't even observe their own children and figure out how to properly interact with them.

I also always find it odd that it's seen as a good thing when children don't meet diagnostic criteria anymore. I do get why it's seen like that, but that doesn't mean these kids aren't still developmentally disabled and that they won't have issues in school from not being able to get services and accommodations. It's "good" when they're 3 and only have to interact with close family members, but not "good" when they're 6, can't handle a crowded classroom environment, and aren't given any help due to not having a diagnosed "reason" for the school to expend the energy to do so.


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