Page 11 of 12 [ 180 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  Next

wrongcitizen
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Oct 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 696

04 May 2019, 6:08 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
wrongcitizen wrote:
Just say square. People wanted to be unique in the past, now people want to be like each other.

I have not heard “square” used to describe someone out of touch since about 1972 or so. I quess that makes you “square” :D :


To be fair, I am often the person I fear most no matter what term.



wrongcitizen
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Oct 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 696

04 May 2019, 6:10 pm

Ironically misused the term. I found it funny sounding verbally but now that I think about it I was looking for mainstream, not old fashioned.



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,690
Location: UK

06 May 2019, 7:59 am

mmcool wrote:
the word nurotypical is getting old and it's meaning is not that right we need a new word for nurotypicals

please reply with suggestions


Others

Image


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 102,306
Location: In a quiet and peaceful garden where Mick Avory-like Sweet Peas grow

15 May 2019, 12:33 pm

Regular people.


_________________
Mick

Kanye West 2024

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=26&start=645


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 18,737
Location: Maidstone, UK

27 May 2019, 12:56 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
BrokenPieces wrote:
Quote:
Muggles


xD

Probably the safest and truest term you can use is "non-autistic". It couldn't possibly offend anyone. And J K Rowling can't sue you for saying it.




Non-autistic isn't accurate to call a whole entire group of people, because that's like saying "there are only two neurotypes: autism and non-autism". I mean, these days even male and female aren't the only two genders any more, as in forums and applications people demand for a third option.

99% of people are allistic, but 99% of people are not all normal or neurotypical.


_________________
Female
Aged 30
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,712

27 May 2019, 11:30 pm

It's probably lost here that neurotypicals actually refer to themselves as "normal"

In Australia we used to call average Joe's "norms" (usually caricatured as a pot bellied beer swilling "bloke" in a singlet, shorts and slippers).



Road Wolf
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 27 May 2019
Age: 57
Posts: 3
Location: UK

28 May 2019, 12:39 am

Stick with neurotypical. Never let down your guard. You don't have to be rude about it and it's not an insult. Just keep it at the back of your mind whenever you are dealing with them. Always weigh everything they tell you, at least twice, before going along with it, or not. If it all sounds too good to be true, it probably is. It doesn't mean you can't like them, fall in love or work with them but never forget what they are, especially if they are in groups. Be careful to whom you extend trust or confide in. Be sure of them before you do. They are okay generally but keep a little healthy scepticism right there at the front of your mind, like a clear lens. All the time, stay wary, because the truth is, most of them don't know who they are or how they will behave in different circumstances. It's not a war or even a struggle, but there is a difference and 'neurotypical' is the best way of defining and remembering that we are different to them. It is like the label they gave us, handed back by way of return.



Last edited by Road Wolf on 28 May 2019, 4:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 18,737
Location: Maidstone, UK

28 May 2019, 3:57 am

To me neurotypical means people wired "normally", in other words aren't born with any developmental delays that will always affect them in some way throughout their lives. So that (non-NT) includes downs syndrome, fragile-X syndrome, intellectual disabilities, autism, ADHD, and some others that I don't know much about. There may seem a lot of mental disabilities but no matter how many I could add, the majority of the population still are neurotypicals and aren't challenged by a mental disability that affects their daily lives.


_________________
Female
Aged 30
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,690
Location: UK

28 May 2019, 12:47 pm

cyberdad wrote:
It's probably lost here that neurotypicals actually refer to themselves as "normal"



That's a bit condescending , are you sure you're not an Aspie :lol:


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,712

29 May 2019, 2:25 am

No but that's my point Mr Bueller

"normal" + "healthy" adult literally equates to neurotyical in scientific terms



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,610
Location: temperate zone

29 May 2019, 2:58 am

A person who is wired correctly (ie "neurotypical") isn't necessarily "normal". Even psychiatrically "normal". They may have other issues (neurosis created by bad parenting, dysfunctional upbringing, or have ptsd, or whatever).

So "normal", and "healthy", aren't exactly a accurate synonyms for "NT".

Admitidly "neurotypical" IS a mild put down of the majority. But its not like American races trading racial epithets- with the autistic minority being equivalent to American Blacks responding to being called "n****r" by calling the White majority "Whitey", or "Honky", or "cr****r".

Its more like how folks who are into kinky sex call the rest of us "vanilla". "NT" just means youre "typical" (ie "bland, and boring" like "vanilla"). Not a major put down. And as with the kinky sex community - few outsiders even know our aspie term for outsiders. Vanilla folks are not even aware that theyre called that, and even if they were they wouldn't care. Likewise very few NTs know the term "NT", and even if they did know it they wouldn't care a darn if you called them that to their face. :lol:



cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,712

29 May 2019, 3:53 am

naturalplastic wrote:
few outsiders even know our aspie term for outsiders. Vanilla folks are not even aware that theyre called that, and even if they were they wouldn't care. Likewise very few NTs know the term "NT", and even if they did know it they wouldn't care a darn if you called them that to their face. :lol:


That's my point - their point of reference for "normal" is...them...



cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,712

29 May 2019, 3:55 am

naturalplastic wrote:

So "normal", and "healthy", aren't exactly a accurate synonyms for "NT".



Probably not, but in scientific studies human participants in control groups are required to be "normal" "healthy" adults.



Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 62
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,657
Location: New York City (Queens)

29 May 2019, 7:50 pm

haidouk wrote:
3) People should not be hung up on "normal", which simply means "most commonly occurring". "Normal" isn't something anyone should feel a need to aspire to. It's literally referring to commonness.

"Normal" DOESN'T just mean that. It also means "serving to establish a standard," i.e. normative. See the dictionary.com definition. Hence the word "normal" isn't really quite compatible with your remarks below:

haidouk wrote:
The far bigger problem is the fear that makes people uncomfortable with their uniqueness. Have pride and appreciation for who you are. Not in the sense of "superiority", but just love yourself for exactly who you are. Be kind to yourself and give yourself a break. Don't judge yourself by the standards of ignorant and hostile people, or try to prove anything to them. You are different (i.e. not "normal")? FANTASTIC! You are actually an interesting person who has value and who brings who brings something to the table. Abandoning this (which you can't really do anyway) just to "fit in" is what is truly objectionable, and quite sad.

In my opinion, "neurotypical" is fine (as a word to refer to people without any developmental disability), and "allistic" is a fine non-negative term for "non-autistic."

In my opinion we need a new word for a category of people in between "autistic" and "allistic," i.e. people who don't quite fit the diagnostic criteria for ASD but have a lot of the same issues. (In the early days of the autistic rights movement, such people were referred to as "cousins." We need a word whose meaning is more self-evident, such as perhaps "autistic-like"?)


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 62
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,657
Location: New York City (Queens)

29 May 2019, 7:53 pm

cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Probably not, but in scientific studies human participants in control groups are required to be "normal" "healthy" adults.

In recent studies of autistic children, the controls are often referred to as "typically developing" (TD). Also I've seen the word "neurotypical" used in relatively recent professional literature on autistic adults.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,712

30 May 2019, 2:06 am

Mona Pereth wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Probably not, but in scientific studies human participants in control groups are required to be "normal" "healthy" adults.

In recent studies of autistic children, the controls are often referred to as "typically developing" (TD). Also I've seen the word "neurotypical" used in relatively recent professional literature on autistic adults.


Yep, children have the added dimension of developmental change...

The term neurotypical is used in research
https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/fu ... 9.08121894