What is full of protein,quick, and cheap?

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muslimmetalhead
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13 Apr 2012, 7:20 pm

Don't say "human life".

I'm 15 so got no time or cooking abilities.


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Alexender
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13 Apr 2012, 7:32 pm

Peanut butter, milk. And any extentions of those. Nuts, diary, cheese.

Mac and cheese is not hard to make, and tastes awesome. Add extra cheese so it is more filling, and more protein.


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Last edited by Alexender on 13 Apr 2012, 7:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Pondering
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13 Apr 2012, 7:35 pm

Cooked Eggs of some sort, there are many ways, which are all pretty much simple enough for a novice cook to do.

Chicken, any read meat, fish, and tofu are good sources of protein, but aside from Tofu, you usually will get a bit of fat with the protein. You could try canned meats, they usually have very little fat in them, but be careful, they are packed with sodium.

There is a bunch of nuts with a lot of protein, but they all have quite a bit of fat. It's best to use with moderation.

Milk is not technically a food, but it's a protein dense drink that many people use to assist them in consuming the proper amount of protein for their weight.

Also, don't forget about protein shake powder. You can add it to milk or water. Check bodybuilding sites and what not, there are some good priced effective powders around.


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Last edited by Pondering on 13 Apr 2012, 7:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Kurgan
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13 Apr 2012, 7:36 pm

Tuna is high in protein and cheap. :) So are eggs, beef, pollock and chicken.



1000Knives
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13 Apr 2012, 8:52 pm

Canned tuna. If you can handle the driedness of it, pretty much no nonprotein calories in it. You add calories by adding mayo, though. Thankfully I hate mayo. If you need to flavor it some, just cover it in hotsauce, actually sometimes I use spare packs of Taco Bell sauce, too. Protein powder isn't bad, either, just sorta expensive for the initial purchase.

Honestly before worrying about like specific grams of protein or whatever, make sure your diet is clean and healthy. No junkfood, get plenty of sleep, etc. Sleep is super duper important, btw, your body needs sleep to recover and repair muscle/tendons, you're gonna need at least a few hours more sleep a night if you get seriously training.



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13 Apr 2012, 8:52 pm

Nothing's cheaper then beans. All kinds, in cans, ready to eat.


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1000Knives
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13 Apr 2012, 8:56 pm

Aharon wrote:
Nothing's cheaper then beans. All kinds, in cans, ready to eat.


Yes, however...
Image

That said, beans aren't bad in that they provide you fiber, and clean carbohydrates, and some protein too.



questor
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13 Apr 2012, 10:32 pm

A couple of other posters beat me to BEANS! However, one of them made a mistake on the calories thing. They compared 11 oz of chicken to approx 40 oz of beans on the calories. That worked out to 530 cal in chicken vs 1850 in that amount of beans. An actual meal portion of beans is about a cup--8 oz. There are about 5 portions in that 39.7 oz can. If you divide that by 5 you get the real portion calorie count. That works out to 370 cal per portion, meaning also, that the big can is a good $ buy, as it has 5 portions in it. If you prefer a more generous portion, let us assume 4 per big can. That still gives a nice cal count of 462.5. The chicken portion in the example was also oversized. Usually the portion cal count in meat is based on a 4, but sometimes 5 or 6 oz size. Let's be generous and figure on a 5 1/2 oz size--2 portions of chick out of the 11 oz pack. That would give a cal count of 265 per portion. While it's still better than the count for the realistic sized portion of beans, it is not necessary for every meal to be the same count. Also, beans are low in cholesterol and fat, and high in fiber and protein. Calories are not the only important factor in choosing what to eat. The food qualities of a food are also important. Some foods that are a little higher in calories are still a good option if they bring some other good qualities to the plate, and that includes beans. Unfortunately, to me they taste awful, but I can get them down with BBQ sauce on. Because they don't need to be refridgerated until cold, and are economical, and have good food qualities, I do buy and eat them. I also keep BBQ sauce on hand to get them down.

Don't worry so much about the cal count of individual foods, though. It's more important to eat healthier in general, without obsessing about every single calorie. That will only add stress to your meal times, and that will give you indigestion.

Forget the cal counting. Just put healthy foods on your plate. In no special order:

- Beans, whole grains, nuts, tofu, nut & grain milks (soy, almond, peanut, oat, rice).
- Lean meats, and fish.
- Dairy--milk (2% fat or less), eggs, low fat cheeses.
- Fruits & Veggies.
- Low fat oils, low fat salad dressings, low fat mayo, low fat sauces, low fat gravies, healthy varieties of margarine.
- Don't forget herbs & spices. They add flavor and nutrients to food. While fresh is best, even dried is good.

That last item above does add some extra calories, but they also add flavor to healthy foods that other wise might be less palatable. This makes it more likely you will eat the healthy foods. You have to have some wiggle room in any menu for flavor. Other wise why eat at all, or why try to eat healthy?

Hope this helps. Bon apatite! :lol:


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ouinon
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14 Apr 2012, 12:53 am

Cheapest and also most concentrated sources of protein are definitely tinned tuna/sardines/mackerel and eggs and frozen generic grey-white fish ( coley etc ).

Pork is also cheap fairly concentrated protein if you can overlook the reasons why it is now usually so cheap, which is that it is reared as if it were nothing but a lump of in-animate/immobile protein-rich plant food, ie. on narrow concrete slabs between bars, and if you don't mind the saturated fats, growth hormones and chemical traces of extreme stress/mental anguish etc that it comes with. Chicken is cheap too of course, as well as tasteless, if it is industrially/intensively raised.

Chickpeas and kidney beans etc are very cheap, when bought dried, ( but need lots of cooking, which costs money, and time ), not so cheap bought tinned/ready-cooked, but are not at all a concentrated protein ( nearly 4 times less protein compared to chicken, as 1000knives pointed out ); they are actually "famine food", a last resort compared to meat, eggs, or fish. The only pulse/leguminous which might be worth it for protein, as opposed to merely sustaining life, is soya, ( as tofu for example, cut into cubes, marinated in tamari/soya sauce and fried in olive oil, or butter :) ).

Ways to make tuna really yummy include mixing with ripe avocado, and using as a dip with veg sticks etc, or ( if you are ok eating mixtures of concentrated carbohydrate and protein ) tuna-rice is good and delicious, ( cook rice, pref brown, with a dash of olive oil and a few cumin and coriander seeds for that x-factor! :lol and add to mixture of mashed-up tuna/mackerel with seasoning, garlic, parsley etc to taste, plus olive oil ), which you can serve with segments of hard-boiled egg, ( like a minimalist kedgeree ) ...

... served like that of course, a concentrated protein mixed with a concentrated carbohydrate, you have pretty much the equivalent, in terms of portion size, protein content, etc as you would have eating a plate of chickpeas with a dairy ( eg. yoghurt ) or seed/nut/fermented soya etc sauce ( but no rice )! !! :lol ... except for the egg-supplement that is.

PS. Depending on where you live you may be able to get shellfish really cheaply, especially mussels. They are concentrated protein too. :)
.



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14 Apr 2012, 3:04 am

Beans. Quinoa.


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Wolfheart
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14 Apr 2012, 8:23 am

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkqiKrl1dZ4[/youtube]

You can't go wrong with rice and chicken breasts if you are on a budget.

Calculate your recommend protein intake here.
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/calpro.htm



sepia
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14 Apr 2012, 12:50 pm

scramble 2-3 eggs with a fist full of whatever (cooked) veg you have to hand and a fist full of lightly toasted oats, for texture (and oats are reputed to lower colesterol). or beans on toast.
et voila - breakfast, lunch or light supper



arielhawksquill
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14 Apr 2012, 1:13 pm

Mozzarella cheese sticks. Lunch meat (a couple pieces of cold ham eaten straight out of the fridge is as quick as it gets for breakfast!) Nuts are good too--you can get cheap packets of them from convenience stores for grab 'n go eating. And as many of the above posters noted, eggs are great. It costs $2 and only takes 20 minutes to boil a dozen eggs; I put them back in their carton and into the fridge and I have quick, portable protein that lasts me more than a week.



Wolfheart
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15 Apr 2012, 2:44 am

arielhawksquill wrote:
Nuts are good too--you can get cheap packets of them from convenience stores for grab 'n go eating.


Organic nuts are only worth eating, any other nuts are packed with saturated fat or salt and organic nuts aren't exactly the cheapest option.