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aspieinsane
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12 Jul 2014, 9:21 am

I guess the good thing about being an aspie and having routines is that if it is related to fitness, then you're pretty much in good shape.
I started training in boxing seven months ago because a co worker of mine was also a coach who was pretty good. I had alot of free time on my hands so I decided to go one day. I liked it for some strange reason and haven been going for four days a week ever since.
Though I am surprised that I ended up doing this in the first place, it has brought a welcomed distraction to life. And even though I can act out my revenge on my former tormentors, I realized that in doing so I would lose who I really was in the process.
So I am hopeful that one day I can be able to travel the world as a result. I am just hoping that this sport can give me a life that is worthwhile.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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12 Jul 2014, 2:15 pm

Hi, I've made posts in which I've advocated boxing as self-defense, and have advocated tight defensive boxing to a draw. Almost prefer a draw, because you'd rather not humiliate a person you're likely to see again. Kind of a zen aspect in that regard. And also kind of zen, because I think if a person is prepared, a fight is actually less likely to happen in some ways.

From the following single medical study, with hopefully good rest after a concussion or probably concussion, it looks like up to 6 years relatively safe, between six and twelve question mark . . . and following that, personal choice, which should be respected. Anyway, it looks like an alright study, and I thought I'd pass it on.

Quote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/25/healt ... .html?_r=0

"The physical changes, detected by M.R.I. scans, are a reduction in size in the hippocampus and thalamus of the brains of fighters with more than six years in the ring. These parts of the brain deal with such functions as memory and alertness. While those who had fought for more than six years did not exhibit any declines in cognitive function, fighters with more than 12 years in the ring did. Thus, Dr. Bernick?s group concluded, the lag between detectability and physical symptoms probably occurs sometime during those six years."



PS I have revenge fantasies, too. And when I 'play the tape' so to speak, or indulge in the fantasy, often it doesn't work. The point I was trying to get the other person to see . . . is lost in whatever. I like the part where you talk about that in revenge, you lose too much of what is you.



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12 Jul 2014, 3:29 pm

Learning to fight is, if only in a vacuum, a great call.

As is just about anything that gets you active that you are passionate about.

I foxed with martial arts briefly a few years ago, mostly muay thai but some straight boxing, but I shattered and dislocated my finger in an unrelated sporting incident after a few months and as a result I can't really punch with my left hand anymore with any confidence/usefulness.

I will say be careful of the proprietors of the gym/studio/whatever you want to call it that you join. With mine, I signed up for a year and crushed my finger after 3-4 months, still paid out the year even though I couldn't go, and the owner/head trainer knew that. He still tried to gouge me out of a shitload more money once my year was up. It's one of the sketchiest and nerve racking conceivable phone calls to call a dude who is 6'3" and 210 of rock and a master of like 9 different schools of martial arts and basically tell him to f**k himself :lol: I paid my dues and he got all the membership money without issue (which was never in question) but not a cent more.

I broke him off over the phone and thank god I never heard a peep from him again.


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aspieinsane
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12 Jul 2014, 5:26 pm

I understand that in terms of health that it could be adversely affecting me in years to come but to be honest, depression is more likely to harm me more than boxing ever could. Physical wounds can heal but mental scars last a lifetime. I would encourage anyone to follow their passion and enjoy it because in the cases of the autism spectrum disorsers, anything that can bring a person even a minute of happiness is worth it.
I know that people can use you for any amount of reasons and that will always be a fact but you have to take a chance or things will never get better. Eventually you will have to trust someone at some point in time and hope that they are nice people who will try and help you. I have been hurt COUNTLESS times but I realized that isolation is not the answer.
Do what you enjoy doing and go from there. Things will work out in the end.



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12 Jul 2014, 11:34 pm

Maybe my last post came off wrong. I certainly wasn't trying to discourage anyone. Mine was more about finding a proprietor who is solid and trustworthy in a business sense (which before I got into it is not something I even remotely considered), and in my case, while the dude was somewhat shady, it really wasn't that bad because as soon as I called him out he just accepted it and left it alone. It's just something to take into consideration.

I wouldn't consider health a big issue, I feel like beginner/intermediate level (i.e. noncompetitive) fighting is probably safer than most sports. It's not like you're going to get tossed into a ring with someone who is going to just beat the s**t out of you :lol:

I've had plenty of physical wounds from sports in my life (an absurdly disproportionate amount of which came from playing basketball), but never a single one from fighting beyond getting my lip split open. I support it to the fullest.


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AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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13 Jul 2014, 4:32 pm

Or, on the other hand, it may not cause adverse effects to your longterm health, as long as you follow good middle-of-the-road health information and take it easy when you need to.

In addition, and I competed in judo as a teenager and have done a little rock climbing, I think dabbling in other sports has positive transfer and helps your main sport. For example, what do you think of American Ninja (or overseas equivalent) with its extremely challenging obstacle courses?



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13 Jul 2014, 5:36 pm

About depression  . . .  I struggle with bouts.  I have not yet tried antidepressants, but they are kind of my Ace in the hole.

I have not had good results with so-called mental health professionals.  Hard to explain, but too often, a crafty negotiation at times disrespectful, where the 'professional' is trying to get me to agree to being an inferior person and therefore that I should do what he or she says.  I mean, really.  I can accept the professional being a coach with us being equals, but not this former set-up.  In fairness, some people here at WrongPlanet have had good relationships with mental health professionals, and more power to them.

I'm more interested in the possibility of seeing a regular doctor like an internist for antidepressants, especially since it's all trial and error anyway.  And, I've read that it's often important to phase down in a series of steps, even if the medication doesn't seem to be working just that your body may have gotten used to it.



aspieinsane
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13 Jul 2014, 6:00 pm

I must admit that I was administered antidepressants and have to say that it does not help. That is my opinion. It made my head hurt like crazy and gave me more depression thinking a drug can help. To be honest, the only thing that can overcome depression is to be happy and in my case, finding supporting people who care and show a genuine interest in my wellbeing can really change my outlook in life.
I wouldn't put all my eggs in on basket particularly if it relates to drugs because it may not do what you thought it would do. But I guess the biggest problem I am faced with is paranoia. I recently read articles about spouses who married people with aspergers and it hurt me so much to know that almost everyone's entry started off like "GET OUT NOW! DON'T LET HIM RUIN YOUR LIFE! "
I like american ninja but I don't live in america.



freddie_mercury
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14 Jul 2014, 3:07 pm

I boxed while I was in the Army. I really enjoyed it - and turned out to be pretty good at it - even though I am not an aggressive person (nor am I very competitive).

It was fun - exhausting, but a lot of fun.



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19 Jul 2014, 5:00 am

aspieinsane wrote:
I guess the good thing about being an aspie and having routines is that if it is related to fitness, then you're pretty much in good shape.
Amen to that.

Yeah! I'm in to all forms of fighting, its almost like an addiction, but in a good way. I enjoy the mental part of it as well as the physical.