Page 1 of 1 [ 12 posts ] 

Roses16
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 5 Nov 2019
Posts: 4
Location: West Coast

05 Nov 2019, 10:15 pm

My brother was diagnosed with Autism at a young age,around 3. He was diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was 18. He is 19 now.

He has been hospitalized a few times. He feels down on himself lately. He cant work currently and he doesnt fit in. Hes mad that he was in special education and he feels embarrassed about it. He couldn't keep up in regular classes since elementary school. Hes always been behind. This might seem bad to say but he kind of is a bit more like a child than an adult. I respect him as an adult though. Most people dont though. They talk down to him. He had an aide who wouldn't let him make his own decisions. He is also not allowed to go out on his own. He wants to get a driver's license but it's not safe for him because of his reflexes and the fact that he has had visual hallucinations that he denies are hallucinations. I want him to be able to do this stuff.

My parents want to get respite care for him. I dont really know what that is though.



Flikk
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 24 Oct 2019
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Posts: 2

07 Nov 2019, 7:50 pm

Does he experience more psychotic symptoms when he's stressed? E.g. starts having hallucinations after having an (autistic relates) overload? Sorry that I ask, it's for personal reasons.



SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 703

07 Nov 2019, 10:17 pm

I fostered children and Respite Care was when our foster son went for some time (typically a night or two) to another family's house.

My grandmother was DX'd schizophrenic and I would bet she had Autism (she was obsessed with electronics and physics). I wish there had been better Occupational Therapy or in-home care decades ago, but no, so she was mostly institutionalized. She satisfied herself with that (I assume at good care facilities) - taught English locally, etc. She did stay with us for 5 years, but my AS-like mother was not equipped to handle that and small children while her husband travelled. Even so, my grandmother was the healthiest she ever was when she stayed with us and I remember her fondly even if I didn't understand.

I am sorry your brother is having a real rough time. Even with my AS I often feel "wrong" and "misfit" (and shame), so I can imagine what he is feeling. I am looking to start feeling "right" by myself and I hope he can find what that looks like for him (and doesn't have to wait another 25 yrs like I did, but if so, it's still worth it!).



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,015
Location: Poland

08 Nov 2019, 9:03 am

What are his hallucinations?
Is there some way for him to really relax?
Psychotic symptoms are often caused by stress overload and, speaking from painful experience, typical ways of handling psychotic patients often make it worse.

Autistics are sometimes misdiagnosed with schizophrenia because of their unusual communication ways. Like "do you hear sounds others don't?" and be answered "yes" because of very sensitive hearing - but the answer gets interpreted as auditory hallucinations. It's worth looking into it.


_________________
Keep calm and choose your battles carefully.


SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 703

08 Nov 2019, 9:46 am

magz wrote:
Autistics are sometimes misdiagnosed with schizophrenia because of their unusual communication ways. Like "do you hear sounds others don't?" and be answered "yes" because of very sensitive hearing - but the answer gets interpreted as auditory hallucinations. It's worth looking into it.

Knowing about that I recently answered "no", but should I have answered "yes"? I sometimes would "hear" my baby cry when she wasn't crying. Or I "hear" a song my child plays over even though I know it's not actually playing (but it takes me a second to figure that out). My AS-like mom now says she hears internal guidance (voices) which she interprets as spiritual guidance. I figure as long as the guidance is helpful, it's all good. My schizophrenic grandmother "heard voices", and now my mom and I wonder how much was Grandma's intuition and vulnerability, if you will. ---- Although the voices I've read about that say "go kill yourself" and feel like outside "advice" are bad, bad, bad. But even those I might approach as --- this is possibly your mind/body's cry for help, what do you need? or do think someone else needs help? That said, I don't know what I am talking about, and maybe I know everything. Which means it's somewhere in between. Harrumph.



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,015
Location: Poland

08 Nov 2019, 10:19 am

There is an entirely normal phenomenon of hearing meaningful sounds in noise.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareidolia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophenia

Otherwise, I think "your mind/body's cry for help" is very accurate when actual psychotic symptoms appear.

I also came across an interesting article on voice hearing:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 085707.htm


_________________
Keep calm and choose your battles carefully.


SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 703

08 Nov 2019, 2:14 pm

magz wrote:
There is an entirely normal phenomenon of hearing meaningful sounds in noise.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareidolia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophenia

Otherwise, I think "your mind/body's cry for help" is very accurate when actual psychotic symptoms appear.

I also came across an interesting article on voice hearing:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 085707.htm


I see a potential pattern in the apophenia definition ---- ASD skilled pattern recognition morphs into apophenia (in this case auditory) and at some threshold crosses into psychosis, e.g. schizophrenia. I am so sending these to my mom so that maybe she has a better understanding of her own mother (RIP). Thank you, magz!



Roses16
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 5 Nov 2019
Posts: 4
Location: West Coast

11 Nov 2019, 4:10 am

Flikk wrote:
Does he experience more psychotic symptoms when he's stressed? E.g. starts having hallucinations after having an (autistic relates) overload? Sorry that I ask, it's for personal reasons.


Yes and No. He has them more when he is stressed but he also has them when he is not.



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,015
Location: Poland

11 Nov 2019, 8:17 am

Roses16 wrote:
Flikk wrote:
Does he experience more psychotic symptoms when he's stressed? E.g. starts having hallucinations after having an (autistic relates) overload? Sorry that I ask, it's for personal reasons.

Yes and No. He has them more when he is stressed but he also has them when he is not.

Remember that as he's autistic, his sensory issues may make him stressed when you have no idea.


_________________
Keep calm and choose your battles carefully.


Roses16
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 5 Nov 2019
Posts: 4
Location: West Coast

11 Nov 2019, 8:50 pm

magz wrote:
Roses16 wrote:
Flikk wrote:
Does he experience more psychotic symptoms when he's stressed? E.g. starts having hallucinations after having an (autistic relates) overload? Sorry that I ask, it's for personal reasons.

Yes and No. He has them more when he is stressed but he also has them when he is not.

Remember that as he's autistic, his sensory issues may make him stressed when you have no idea.


What do you mean? Sorry, he just doesnt talk about his feelings a lot. He changes the topic if you ask him if he is overwhelmed or stressed. I dont know why he does it.



SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 703

11 Nov 2019, 9:05 pm

Roses16 wrote:
What do you mean? Sorry, he just doesnt talk about his feelings a lot. He changes the topic if you ask him if he is overwhelmed or stressed. I dont know why he does it.

For me, I feel big. I feel really big. I haven't been able to find a happy medium of expression, so it's either avoid it (push it down, don't talk about it), or if I talk about I often use inappropriate expression (smile hysterically and giggle), or "am myself" (lots of crying). Generally I shut down b/c that is more socially acceptable (albeit misinterpreted) than the other options. I did try the latter option at a support group and was told not to come back. Avoiding the topic (feeling) seems to be a better option than feeling "inappropriately" or "too big". I can imagine it's even harder for a man b/c most cultures discourage expression of feelings in men in general.



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,015
Location: Poland

12 Nov 2019, 4:32 am

^ ^ this.
Talking about emotions, even thinking about them is incredibly difficult and overwhelming.
I also meant that small noises, lights or uncomfortable textures, things like that may cause distress in situations that would not be distressing at all for a neurotypical.


_________________
Keep calm and choose your battles carefully.