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JakeDay
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04 Oct 2013, 12:21 pm

Yes I'm here to share. I have PTSD, diagnosed about 3 years ago. I was diagnosed with HFA last week. I suspect I've suffered from PTSD for most of my life, growing up with autism in a time when it barely existed in the text books was not entirely easy. But about 3 years ago, I survived an armed holdup. The PTSD I am suffering from as a result of that incident is still with me, my secure relationship of 8 years just disintegrated a couple of months ago, and I live with painful anxiety every day. I have really suffered because of this. Getting the HFA diagnosis has given me something to cling to. Now that I am back at square one, I think I can rebuild my life in a way that accommodates my needs more successfully. I wish you well in your recovery and regeneration.



Raziel
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04 Oct 2013, 1:37 pm

I had PTSD (and still have some symptoms) starting 3 years ago and it got gradually better but still cause me still some suffer.
So, PTSD can get better, but it can take years and years.

But PTSD is very cribbling.


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Sherry221B
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30 Oct 2013, 7:29 am

This interests me. I had to know what is hell. I, myself, have been unwilling through repetitive traumatic events in my existence, and I'm fully aware that at some point, I will develop Complex PTSD.



Nambo
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30 Oct 2013, 1:30 pm

Well thanks for that, whilst I was confident I had PTSD due to my complete childhood, apart from 3 wonderful years in a Children's Home, being in the same house as a violent sadist who hated my existence so I was in permanent fear, I had never heard of Complex PTSD so looked it up on Wiki where I found such symptoms as:-

" People seek increased attachment in the face of danger. Adults, as well as children, may develop strong emotional ties with people who intermittently harass, beat, and, threaten them. The persistence of these attachment bonds leads to confusion of pain and love. Trauma can be repeated on behavioural, emotional, physiologic, and neuroendocrinologic levels. Repetition on these different levels causes a large variety of individual and social suffering.

Anger directed against the self or others is always a central problem in the lives of people who have been violated and this is itself a repetitive re-enactment of real events from the past. Compulsive repetition of the trauma usually is an unconscious process that, although it may provide a temporary sense of mastery or even pleasure, ultimately perpetuates chronic feelings of helplessness and a subjective sense of being bad and out of control. Gaining control over one's current life, rather than repeating trauma in action, mood, or somatic states, is the goal of healing.[30]

Seeking increased attachment to people, especially to care-givers who inflict pain, confuses love and pain and increases the likelihood of a captivity like that of betrayal bonding,[31] (similar to Stockholm syndrome) and of disempowerment and lack of control. If the situation is perceived as life threatening then traumatic stress responses will likely arise and C-PTSD more likely diagnosed in a situation of insecure attachment than PTSD.[citation needed]

In Trauma and Recovery, Herman expresses the additional concern that patients who suffer from C-PTSD frequently risk being misunderstood as inherently 'dependent', 'masochistic', or 'self-defeating', "

Well although I have been diagnosed with attachment disorder, I never admitted my extreme masochistic needs, but guessed they were a perversion of legitimate emotional bonding caused by learning as a child that a relationship with others must involve terror, pain and humiliation.



browneyedgirlslowingdown
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13 Jun 2021, 3:03 pm

Nambo wrote:
Well thanks for that, whilst I was confident I had PTSD due to my complete childhood, apart from 3 wonderful years in a Children's Home, being in the same house as a violent sadist who hated my existence so I was in permanent fear, I had never heard of Complex PTSD so looked it up on Wiki where I found such symptoms as:-

" People seek increased attachment in the face of danger. Adults, as well as children, may develop strong emotional ties with people who intermittently harass, beat, and, threaten them. The persistence of these attachment bonds leads to confusion of pain and love. Trauma can be repeated on behavioural, emotional, physiologic, and neuroendocrinologic levels. Repetition on these different levels causes a large variety of individual and social suffering.

Anger directed against the self or others is always a central problem in the lives of people who have been violated and this is itself a repetitive re-enactment of real events from the past. Compulsive repetition of the trauma usually is an unconscious process that, although it may provide a temporary sense of mastery or even pleasure, ultimately perpetuates chronic feelings of helplessness and a subjective sense of being bad and out of control. Gaining control over one's current life, rather than repeating trauma in action, mood, or somatic states, is the goal of healing.[30]

Seeking increased attachment to people, especially to care-givers who inflict pain, confuses love and pain and increases the likelihood of a captivity like that of betrayal bonding,[31] (similar to Stockholm syndrome) and of disempowerment and lack of control. If the situation is perceived as life threatening then traumatic stress responses will likely arise and C-PTSD more likely diagnosed in a situation of insecure attachment than PTSD.[citation needed]

In Trauma and Recovery, Herman expresses the additional concern that patients who suffer from C-PTSD frequently risk being misunderstood as inherently 'dependent', 'masochistic', or 'self-defeating', "

Well although I have been diagnosed with attachment disorder, I never admitted my extreme masochistic needs, but guessed they were a perversion of legitimate emotional bonding caused by learning as a child that a relationship with others must involve terror, pain and humiliation.



I realize this post is very very old but, thanks for posting this reply, I looked up the book you cite here Trauma and Recovery by Herman, and realized she is quoted by another book I am reading, the Body Keeps the Score. I will read this book as well. Thanks and hope you are well although significant time has passed.


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Diagnosed ASD 5/17/21
AQ 40/50
Your broader autism cluster (Aspie) score: 153 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 50 of 200
You are very likely on the broader autism cluster (Aspie)
Systemising Quotient (SQ) 78
Empathy Quotient (EQ) 41
CAT-Q 156 Compensation 56 Masking 48 Assimilation 52


chaosmos
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21 Jul 2021, 12:08 am

browneyedgirlslowingdown wrote:
Nambo wrote:
Well thanks for that, whilst I was confident I had PTSD due to my complete childhood, apart from 3 wonderful years in a Children's Home, being in the same house as a violent sadist who hated my existence so I was in permanent fear, I had never heard of Complex PTSD so looked it up on Wiki where I found such symptoms as:-

" People seek increased attachment in the face of danger. Adults, as well as children, may develop strong emotional ties with people who intermittently harass, beat, and, threaten them. The persistence of these attachment bonds leads to confusion of pain and love. Trauma can be repeated on behavioural, emotional, physiologic, and neuroendocrinologic levels. Repetition on these different levels causes a large variety of individual and social suffering.

Anger directed against the self or others is always a central problem in the lives of people who have been violated and this is itself a repetitive re-enactment of real events from the past. Compulsive repetition of the trauma usually is an unconscious process that, although it may provide a temporary sense of mastery or even pleasure, ultimately perpetuates chronic feelings of helplessness and a subjective sense of being bad and out of control. Gaining control over one's current life, rather than repeating trauma in action, mood, or somatic states, is the goal of healing.[30]

Seeking increased attachment to people, especially to care-givers who inflict pain, confuses love and pain and increases the likelihood of a captivity like that of betrayal bonding,[31] (similar to Stockholm syndrome) and of disempowerment and lack of control. If the situation is perceived as life threatening then traumatic stress responses will likely arise and C-PTSD more likely diagnosed in a situation of insecure attachment than PTSD.[citation needed]

In Trauma and Recovery, Herman expresses the additional concern that patients who suffer from C-PTSD frequently risk being misunderstood as inherently 'dependent', 'masochistic', or 'self-defeating', "

Well although I have been diagnosed with attachment disorder, I never admitted my extreme masochistic needs, but guessed they were a perversion of legitimate emotional bonding caused by learning as a child that a relationship with others must involve terror, pain and humiliation.



I realize this post is very very old but, thanks for posting this reply, I looked up the book you cite here Trauma and Recovery by Herman, and realized she is quoted by another book I am reading, the Body Keeps the Score. I will read this book as well. Thanks and hope you are well although significant time has passed.


The Body Keeps the Score is a great book that really helped me to understand my C-PTSD. I grew up with many many years of childhood adversity from physical and emotional abuse, substance abuse in the household, incarceration of a parent. I think my trauma meant I had to deal with life in a very independent and aggressive manner. I've struggled with relationships. I think my ASD quirks and qualities were missed because adults weren't look out for me.



TenMinutes
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21 Jul 2021, 5:39 am

Don't know, but the ongoing trauma some autistic people experience seems a lot like c-ptsd. I know I relate to pretty much everything someone posts to facebook on the topic.



chaosmos
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21 Jul 2021, 7:23 pm

TenMinutes wrote:
Don't know, but the ongoing trauma some autistic people experience seems a lot like c-ptsd. I know I relate to pretty much everything someone posts to facebook on the topic.


Totally! It seems like a lot of my hyper sensitivities meant I was a lot more subject to trauma. My NT sister, who lived much of the same life as me, is no where near as affected. Which, whilst we were growing up, never made any sense to me… but now I suspect it is because I am not NT.