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Sweetleaf
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17 Jun 2022, 3:33 am

because I am 32, but I have had a few err...happenings of hearing things, and when I investigate if it is indeed just noise from outside it seems like it is not. And it does not happen often, but for sure it has been enough for me to wonder like if I am hearing stuff in my head and attributing it to my surroundings when maybe I am just imagining or hallucinating it.

I mean when I was younger I got like a lot of those hallucinations you can get when close to falling asleep, but like I thought I got past that dumb stuff, but also I am noticing more feeling a bit freaked out when it gets late at night even if I have light on in my apartment it sometimes feels like when i was a kid and afraid of monsters under the bed or whatever. But also all the shootings I keep hearing about keep stressing me out because, I was in a situation like that and it gave me ptsd. So hearing about more shootings(and there have been a lot lately it seems) kind of triggers it, and I know you can get offhand weirdness when under a lot of stress so I don't want to jump to conclusions. Just sick of thinking I hear things at night when if I open a window or whatever to determine if I heard something from outside does not seem the case. And part of my brain is like 'oh well some people probably get scizophrenia in their 30's so that's for sure what it is!' But idk that thought hit me the other day and so I was thinking I hope like being 32 I am a bit old for that to suddenly develop so it is probably just stress and a bit of lack of sleep but idk what do y'all think?


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magz
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17 Jun 2022, 3:46 am

How is your sleep routine?
Not all hallucinations are schizophrenia. They can be even an effect of stress or fatigue. PTSD and severe depression can also be causes.
If things happen only around falling asleep, they are probably just hypnagogic hallucinations, nothing to worry about - dreams start launching before senses are cut out.


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Sweetleaf
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17 Jun 2022, 4:03 am

magz wrote:
How is your sleep routine?
Not all hallucinations are schizophrenia. They can be even an effect of stress or fatigue. If things happen only around falling asleep, they are probably just hypnagogic hallucinations, nothing to worry about - dreams start launching before senses are cut out.


Well I try to get to bed before 12 am beause if I stay up past that I just won't bother going to bed. but then I am trying to get up at 5:30 or at least by 6:00 so I have time to eat a little breakfast and wake up before heading to work. which I don't have a car but I got a little electronic schooter with a cruise mode you can just kick it up to speed and it will keep that speed...it is a pretty cool feature a lot less hard on your hand than constantly having to push the part down to increase speed. but also I did realize the other day I litterally don't eat breakfast so that is why I probably feel so tired and burnt out after my shift so from now on I will force myself to get up and eat breakfast. But it is kind of why I don't want to jump on scizophrenia could be more likely not getting enough nutrition and sleep to compensate for the stress that hearing about shootings that end up reminding me of what I went through is causing. But it just sucks because the PTSD f***s with my guts and makes it hard to eat properly as well. Like before PTSD I was the tiny person people where wondering how could just eat a huge subway sandwich in 10 minutes, to like now kind of picking at food and just eating smaller portions or not finishing my meal. So idk if it will work but err I have to eat in the morning or my whole day sucks....I just don't know what to eat and I can never predict if my stomach will give me trouble for the thing I decide to eat.


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magz
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17 Jun 2022, 4:08 am

I think PTSD is more likely to cause your hallucinations than schizophrenia. You don't show schizophrenic ways of thoughts.
I imagine your PTSD is badly triggered nowadays :(


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Sweetleaf
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17 Jun 2022, 4:20 am

magz wrote:
I think PTSD is more likely to cause your hallucinations than schizophrenia. You don't show schizophrenic ways of thoughts.
I imagine your PTSD is badly triggered nowadays :(

Yeah it for sure is, like I cannot help anytime I go in a store having hypervigilance and having to look all directions over and over just to make sure there is not an active shooter...and not like I can help it either I just catch myself staring around and thinking stop that or people will think you're crazy. But at the same time like I prefer to observe just in case something happens. Not that you would nessisarlily see something before hand like some of the victims of like mass shootings may not have seen it coming and liklely never stood a chance. But that is the scary part you can just be living your life and shot for that...and that poor teacher in ulvade who says he lost his whole classroom of kids he was teaching.....that poor man, like wtf every single one of his students killed, may not leave a physical scar but...yeah how is he to fully recover from that.


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magz
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17 Jun 2022, 4:32 am

Ugh, the pressure to downplay it to "pretend to be normal" likely makes it worse. I suspect that's why my grandmother never healed her war scars - she didn't want to be viewed as crazy, she feared thinking of herself as crazy, so she never gave space to feelings that were actually completely normal given the circumstances and her sensitivity.
It's horrible that more and more people have to experience all this, in various places in the world :(


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klanka
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17 Jun 2022, 4:32 am

Hope you get the help you need



Last edited by klanka on 17 Jun 2022, 4:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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17 Jun 2022, 5:16 am

I hope you can find ways to take care of yourself so your body can calm down. Doing such helps me when I am having symptoms of stress, etc.


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kraftiekortie
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17 Jun 2022, 5:47 am

I don’t sense schizophrenia at all.



naturalplastic
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19 Jun 2022, 4:14 pm

What Magz said. Its your PTSD being trigger by the news about spree shooters. Hypervigilence.

No schizophrenia involved.

I wish that there was some pill that you could take that would just magically make the memory of that trauma you had just go away.



eyelessshiver
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24 Jun 2022, 11:58 am

Maybe some professional help would be a good idea? Technically, 32 is not too old to get schizophrenia. It can happen whenever, but generally, onset happens by age 30.

Right now I agree with others that this sounds more like it's exclusively PTSD-related (hypervigilance and/or flashbacks).

I'd think therapy and/or medications could help with sleep and anxiety. That might fix many of your problems right there. Of course it's also a matter of the time that you will need to recover.

I am sorry to hear of your troubles. But I encourage you to try to keep a positive frame of mind, seek support from others in your life, and pursue clinical treatment as well.



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24 Jun 2022, 12:43 pm

https://www.idrlabs.com/psychosis-spectrum/test.php

https://www.idrlabs.com/3-minute-schizophrenia/test.php


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TheRealGK
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16 Jul 2022, 2:47 pm

As with all mental "illnesses", schizophrenia is merely an invented label used by psychiatrists to say that you are not normal. It is therefore impossible to "get" schizophrenia.



LordMikey
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30 Jul 2022, 2:47 pm

You're never too old to develop schizophrenia, but I highly suggest you stop worrying about it and stop researching mental health disorders. It's actually better not to know what labels you were given and to just try to cope with the symptoms you have. Knowing the labels and researching their history and what they mean might interfere with your therapy.

I'm not a professional, but I suggest you try not to think of yourself as having an incurable disorder/disability -- try to think of yourself as having some issues/symptoms that might go away.


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