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usagibryan
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16 Jul 2020, 8:23 am

To elaborate, I can go weeks or months of not wanting to do anything that isn't my responsibility, just watching TV or playing video games, or feeling too tired to even play games, not wanting to see anyone, etc. Life is just responsibilities and that's the only reason I get out of bed. Now I'm in a state of mind where I'm excited and want to do everything, exercise, grooming, studying, practice piano, etc, I'm thinking about getting a new look, buying random things I don't need but think are cool. I'm making bucket lists and talking to people I haven't spoken to in forever, I become flamboyant, talking people's ears off about random ideas, asking friends weird questions like "have you ever wanted to try archery", etc. But then I hit a wall or feel like something is preventing me from what I want to do, and I fall back down again. Is this what bipolar people go through?



redrobin62
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16 Jul 2020, 5:07 pm

Yep. Sounds like bipolar disorder to me. In my down periods, I don't want to do squat but sleep. In my up periods, I've written hundreds of poems, novels, screenplays, songs, etc. I guess it's just something you learn to live with. What helps me is I try my level best to avoid things that can trigger hypermanic episodes; in my case, that's people in general.



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16 Jul 2020, 5:18 pm

usagibryan wrote:
To elaborate, I can go weeks or months of not wanting to do anything that isn't my responsibility, just watching TV or playing video games, or feeling too tired to even play games, not wanting to see anyone, etc. Life is just responsibilities and that's the only reason I get out of bed. Now I'm in a state of mind where I'm excited and want to do everything, exercise, grooming, studying, practice piano, etc, I'm thinking about getting a new look, buying random things I don't need but think are cool. I'm making bucket lists and talking to people I haven't spoken to in forever, I become flamboyant, talking people's ears off about random ideas, asking friends weird questions like "have you ever wanted to try archery", etc. But then I hit a wall or feel like something is preventing me from what I want to do, and I fall back down again. Is this what bipolar people go through?

It sounds liek it's possible that is bipolar. However while i've experienced both Manic and Depressive episodes. I am not bipolar so I can't be sure. My experience with both is that,
Mania/hypomania
DSM-5 wrote:
Manic Episode
A. A distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood
and abnormally and persistently increased goal-directed activity or energy, lasting at
least 1 week and present most of the day, nearly every day (or any duration if hospitalization is necessary).
B. During the period of mood disturbance and increased energy or activity, three (or
more) of the following symptoms (four if the mood is only irritable) are present to a significant degree and represent a noticeable change from usual behavior:
1. Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity.
2. Decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep).
3. More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking.
4. Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing.
5. Distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external
stimuli), as reported or observed.
6. Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or
psychomotor agitation (i.e., puφoseless non-goal-directed activity).
7. Excessive involvement in activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or
foolish business investments).
C. The mood disturbance is sufficiently severe to cause marked impairment in social or
occupational functioning or to necessitate hospitalization to prevent harm to self or others, or there are psychotic features.
D. The episode is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug
of abuse, a medication, other treatment) or to another medical condition.
Note: A full manic episode that emerges during antidepressant treatment (e.g., medication, electroconvulsive therapy) but persists at a fully syndromal level beyond the
physiological effect of that treatment is sufficient evidence for a manic episode and,
therefore, a bipolar I diagnosis.
Note: Criteria A-D constitute a manic episode. At least one lifetime manic episode is required for the diagnosis of bipolar I disorder.
Hypomanie Episode
A. A distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood
and abnormally and persistently increased activity or energy, lasting at least 4 consecutive days and present
most of the day, nearly every day.
B. During the period of mood disturbance and increased energy and activity, three (or
more) of the following symptoms (four if the mood is only irritable) have persisted, represent a noticeable
change from usual behavior, and have been present to a significant degree:
1. Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity.
2. Decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep).
3. More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking.
4. Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing.
5. Distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external
stimuli), as reported or observed.
6. Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or
psychomotor agitation.
7. Excessive involvement in activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in
unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or
foolish business investments).
C. The episode is associated with an unequivocal change in functioning that is uncharacteristic of the individual
when not symptomatic.
D. The disturbance in mood and the change in functioning are observable by others.
E. The episode is not severe enough to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning or to
necessitate hospitalization. If there are psychotic features, the episode is, by definition, manic.
F. The episode is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication,
other treatment).
Note: A full hypomanie episode that emerges during antidepressant treatment (e.g., medication,
electroconvulsive therapy) but persists at a fully syndromal level beyond
the physiological effect of that treatment is sufficient evidence for a hypomanie episode
diagnosis. However, caution is indicated so that one or two symptoms (particularly increased irritability, edginess,
or agitation following antidepressant use) are not taken
as sufficient for diagnosis of a hypomanie episode, nor necessarily indicative of a bipolar diathesis.
Note: Criteria A-'F constitute a hypomanie episode. Hypomanie episodes are common in
bipolar I disorder but are not required for the diagnosis of bipolar I disorder.
Major Depressive Episode
A. Five (or more) of the following symptoms have been present during the same 2-week
period and represent a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms
is either (1) depressed mood or (2) loss of interest or pleasure.
Note: Do not include symptoms that are clearly attributable to another medical condition.
1. Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, as indicated by either subjective report (e.g., feels sad,
empty, or hopeless) or observation made by others (e.g.,
appears tearful). (Note: In children and adolescents, can be irritable mood.)
2. Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the
day, nearly every day (as indicated by either subjective account or observation).
3. Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than
5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every
day. (Note: In children, consider failure to make expected weight gain.)
4. Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day.
5. Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others; not
merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down).
6. Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day.
7. Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt (which may be delusional) nearly every day (not
merely self-reproach or guilt about being sick).
8. Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or
as observed by others).
9. Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a
suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide.
B. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas
of functioning.
C. The episode is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance or another
medical condition.

DSM-5 wrote:
Bipolar I Disorder
A. Criteria have been met for at least one manic episode (Criteria A-D under “Manic Episode” above).
B. The occurrence of the manic and major depressive episode(s) is not better explained
by schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, delusional disorder, or other specified or unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic
disorder.

I hope this helps. It also seems that autistic burnout can cause both, for some people. Have you experienced Autistic burnout?


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usagibryan
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17 Jul 2020, 2:18 pm

I never heard of autistic burnout but after reading about it I think I experience something like that. I get mentally exhausted after dealing with other people and their spontaneity or being outside too long and have to recharge, get back on my own schedule and in my own comfort zone.



Jakki
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17 Jul 2020, 2:30 pm

Sounds a little aspie like to me. Prolly not bi polar . 8O


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Pieplup
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17 Jul 2020, 6:48 pm

usagibryan wrote:
I never heard of autistic burnout but after reading about it I think I experience something like that. I get mentally exhausted after dealing with other people and their spontaneity or being outside too long and have to recharge, get back on my own schedule and in my own comfort zone.

Burnout is a bit more than that. Burnout usually takes months to recover from in my experience.


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25 Jul 2020, 12:31 am

I do this a lot, although the hyper periods are useless if I'm also too exhausted to have the energy to focus my 'hyperness', basically I'll be mentally restless and creative but not able to follow the trains of thought at all.


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