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FranzOren
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03 Apr 2021, 11:12 pm

Is committing crimes statistically common with Bipolar Disorder? I was sometimes also dangerous when I had mania, anger problems, and psychosis at the age of fifteen for one month.

I understand that most people with mental health and developmental disorders are ten times more likely to be victims than commit crimes, but when you are having manic episode with psychosis, it may cause you to commit crimes that you otherwise would not commit.

I had profound manic episode and once committed violent crime, by throwing tables and punching my former teachers hard and got suspended from school because of that.

I was fifteen years old at that time when I had serious anger issues, depression, mania, psychosis and even Conduct Disorder.

I was this close into being diagnosed with Antisocial Personality Disorder at the age of 18 if I did not stop committing crimes while being psychotic.

I also have Autism.


Is it possible to have Antisocial Personality Disorder and Autism at the same time?

I have Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified.

I have many psychiatric disorders and many factors that lead me to commit violence.

I had paranoid delusions that I was being harmed. Can that explain why I acted in violence?



funeralxempire
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04 Apr 2021, 1:25 am

I've f****d people up before.

Violence is a natural response in certain situations, the problem is that both ASD and mental health disorders can cloud one's understand of the situation. The response to the situation might be disconnected or disproportionate to the actual situation.

That said, since folks with either ASD and/or mental health issues are also at an elevated risk of being victims of crimes there's also potential for an unreasonable reaction being the result of being placed in an unreasonable circumstance.

If you committed violence you committed violence, just own it if you did it. Yes, other factors probably contributed to it, but if you did it you did it and accepting responsibility for it is important.


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FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 5:01 am

Thank you! But I meant to say that it wasn't always my fault. I had paranoid delusions, I didn't mean to harm my former teachers. I just didn't feel safe for whatever reason.

I was also violent, because my environment changed and is also a symptom of Autism. Changes in routine makes me paranoid. It is common for people with ASD to have problems with changes in routine.

I did apologize to my former teachers that I punched and threw tables at. It took some time for them to forgive me, but over time, I started to have good relationship with my former teachers.

All I have to do is apologize for what I did, even if it was my psychosis and not my fault.



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04 Apr 2021, 11:34 am

I don't know much about what disorders a person can have at the same time, but violence is a common response to fear. It is supposed to help keep us safe from a threat. If you were scared or confused and acted in a violent way, that makes sense. It doesn't justify what happened, but it doesn't have to define you as a person. Forgiveness from others is always good, but you can also forgive yourself too, regardless of how others respond.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 11:56 am

Thank you! I understood.

You can check my website:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2P ... Oaszbq/pub



SpottedMushroom
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04 Apr 2021, 12:03 pm

It looks like you do research to understand yourself better. I can't say what you experience or don't, or what causes all of it. I'm no expert. But I hope you are able to find some answers and proper support for whatever you find. It's hard to go through these things alone.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 12:06 pm

Thank you! I understood.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 1:13 pm

Is it normal that I sometimes have traits of Narcissistic Personality Disorder, before I get depressed few weeks later, because I have Bipolar Disorder?

I have history of profound mania, moderate psychosis, some criminality without mens rea that is related to my former delusions that I used to have in the past and depressive episodes for one month at the age of fifteen.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 1:23 pm

NPD-like traits is very common with Bipolar when you are happy to an unhealthy extent.



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04 Apr 2021, 1:29 pm

^ Are you talking about an increased sense of confidence, importance, etc. while experiencing mania? Like you said, that's a very common symptom of mania.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 1:43 pm

It's kind of like a very mild form Delusion of grandeur that doesn't last long?

I sometimes develop Delusion of grandeur when I am too egoistic and happy to an unhealthy extent.



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04 Apr 2021, 1:50 pm

From what I know people with bipolar disorder can experience psychosis or aspects of it, like delusions of grandeur, especially when manic. Some of my family members with bipolar disorder have gone into psychotic episodes while manic.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 2:08 pm

Thank you! I understood.



jimmy m
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04 Apr 2021, 3:28 pm

In the fight-or-flight response, the objective is to get away from the source of threat. All of our muscles prepare for this escape by increasing their tension level, our heart rate and respiration increase, and our whole basic metabolic system is flooded with adrenaline. Blood is diverted to the muscles, away from the viscera. The goal is to run away, or if we feel that we can't escape or if we perceive that the individual that's trying to attack us is less strong than we are, to attack them. Or if we're cornered by a predator—in other words, if there's no way to escape—then we'll fight back. Now, if none of those procedures are effective, and it looks like we're going to be killed, we go into the shock state, the tonic immobility. Now the key is that when people get into this immobility state, they do it in a state of fear. And as they come out of the immobility state, they also enter a state of fear, and actually a state in which they are prepared for what sometimes is called rage counterattack. For example, you see a cat chasing a mouse. The cat catches the mouse and has it in its paws, and the mouse goes into this immobility response. And sometimes you'll actually see the cat bat the mouse around a little bit until it comes out of the immobility, because the cat wants the chase to go on. Now, what can happen is that the mouse, when it comes out of the immobility state, goes into what is called nondirective flight. It doesn't even look for where it can run. It just runs as fast as it can in any direction. Sometimes that's right into the cat. Other times, it will actually attack, in a counterattack of rage. I've actually seen a mouse that was captured by a cat come out of the immobility and attack the cat's nose. The cat was so startled it remained there in a state of shock while the mouse scurried away. When people come out of this immobility response, their potential for rage is so strong and the associated sensations are so intense that they are afraid of their own impulse to strike out and to defend themselves. Again, this all goes back to our animal heritage.

People experiencing PTSD will sometimes exhibit outburst of anger and rage. The angry outbursts and aggressive behavior can occur because the individual relives the trauma (recreates the event as a flashbacks) and this drives them back into a state of fear-induced immobilization. When they return back out of the tonic immobility state, they can vent the stress energy in a rage counterattack. In this state they can mindlessly attack and harm others, including their loved ones.


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FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 3:50 pm

Holly molly. This is EXACTLY how PSYCHOSIS forms.

The part of neurons in your brain doesn't connect as good causing your brain to play tricks on your eyes.

It's scary, tormenting and very traumatizing to experience delusional disorders, psychosis or in worse cases Schizophrenia.



FranzOren
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04 Apr 2021, 11:54 pm

I contacted the police.

I am having a mild manic episode and have psychotic memories