Aspie authors writing social interaction

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Claradoon
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08 Dec 2006, 6:14 am

KBABZ, got it! I just realized your name looks kind of cool, almost like an acronym (that's the forward/backward thing, yes?) but not quite. It's actually got a design. Are you a design person?



KBABZ
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08 Dec 2006, 6:27 am

Well, I do like to put meaning into my designs (mention of that word means yes!). The title of my story, Outcast, has meaning because it reflects the way the main characters live, especially from Section II. Another one is Kipo's last name, Lamron (it's got to do with normaL :wink:). If I were to list all the design things in and around the place I could go on all night!

With the acronym, I also realised recently you can form a Z with the K if you re-arrange the lines used in Z (tilt the longest line till it's vertical, and have the two shortest lines form a v pointing to the left, and have that touching the vertical line you made earlier. Cool, eh?).


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squier
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23 Dec 2006, 12:29 pm

i just had an idea for a scifi book! tell me what you think: (and don't even think about trying to steal my idea, i can report you for inapropiate behaviour)

according to einstein's theory, E=mc2, where light is the constant ( the c2, or c squared ) if you were to travel any faster than the speed of light, you would literally disintegrate, but if you were to replace light with time, then time travel would be possible, but the government immediately (or almost) put a law on the invention, stating you would need a lisence to "travel" time, because they were afraid that the traveling would effect the timeline, and ultimately, destroying all existance of life, even though they knew that if time were to be changed in the past, then the effects were to have already happened, anyway, legally, you can return someone to life by going to the past with a liscence and saving them if they have a lisence and the person did not die of natural causes, but once these people have been brought back, they are still legally dead, so there rights are not very well established, and they are not equal to those who are yet to die, the book is about a boy named Zamion, who wants to be a time-rider, or someone who travels time to save someone's life, gets this job (he is around, 19, or something) and discovers the rights of the legally dead are not well established, because it is a sort of secret, becomes a sort of activist for the legally dead...

i am still not sure about the title yet, i am thinking either "knight of the legal dead" or just "legally dead"... tell me what you think....


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my book:
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Dwellerofthedeep
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26 Dec 2006, 3:04 pm

Sounds like a good enough idea to me. A word of caution though, if the science is going to be a big part of the stroy it pays to study it well, do your homework and everything will be all right.



RaoulDuke
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27 Dec 2006, 3:46 am

Whoops



KBABZ
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28 Dec 2006, 1:38 pm

Dwellerofthedeep wrote:
Sounds like a good enough idea to me. A word of caution though, if the science is going to be a big part of the stroy it pays to study it well, do your homework and everything will be all right.

Yeah. I ran into a semi-similar problem when I Googled one of my made-up elements called Electromagnesium, only to find that it had been used in an X-Men comic!

Don't worry, the only bits where sci-fi technology is really heavily invlolved is when the stry gets nearer to the heart of the Bad Guy's Empire, and during the bits involving the fictional planet of Inithial, which, in a similar way to the Star Wars galaxy, is ahead of us in technilogical acheivements.


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And sadness turned to comfort
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diaganolosis
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01 Jan 2007, 12:41 pm

Hey guys
I'm interested in the benefits that come from writing social interaction by those with AS. Anyone have experience using this as a device to understand and relate to people ? I don't know if there's a thread for this yet, but basically I'm interested in the whole idea of art as therapy. Whether it be crafting complex metaphors in poetry or finding unlikely humor; surely this must have some long term value for managing AS symptoms. Singing or music practice, for example, might also help those with awkward or innapropriate speaking methods.

I also sometimes wonder what important literary contribution will IMO eventually be made by someone from the AS community. I believe there hasn't yet been one but will be - I'm skeptical of those famous AS lists that name drop famous authors. IMO the "Great aspergian novel" will be probably be heavily autobiographical and insular. The fact that Spielberg was interested in "Mozart and the Whale" is a good indication of the artistic possibilities of the AS struggle. So, yes I'm obviously interested in writing social interaction and think's it's helpful, but I think that sticking to our strengths are what will get us noticed.

I think that all it would take is for a movie or novel to achieve the same popularity and cultural resonance of something like a Garden state. Young people who saw that movie found themself sympathising with depression and appreciating a subtle introspective perspective on the world. Most importantly - they seem to do this with genuine affinity for the characters rather than in a detached and condescending way. For the record, I don't believe Mozart and the whale (book or movie) satisfies the criteria of what I was talking about. I see efforts like these as confined to their chosen "slice of life" and lacking the broad appeal I'm hinting at.

Oh and sorry if I got off topic with the second part....



diaganolosis
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04 Jan 2007, 10:06 am

Nobodies commented on my message yet :cry: I feel like I'm "stimming" myself here people... And it doesn't feel that bad :wink: But it could be better :P Someone must have missed the metaphor about vintage routemasters in London - such are the symptoms of AS.



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06 Jan 2007, 11:05 am

I love to write. I just finished writing a book called, "The Race for Roger," about an English boy whose parents seek to help him overcome seemingly hopeless odds. He was diagnosed as "hopeless" at birth but, with the love of his family, overcame the odds.

I am also hoping to write a story about my cat, Samantha, who lived to be 20.



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11 Jan 2007, 2:07 pm

9CatMom wrote:
I love to write.
I am also hoping to write a story about my cat, Samantha, who lived to be 20.


Some people who live down the lane from me had a cat who lived that long. It was funny/sad the way it looked. It's fur was all raggedy like a well used teddy bear. It had also gone deaf, and would sit there and open it's mouth, thinking it was meowing, but no sound came out. It had to see you before you could pet it, since it couldn't hear you. It was an outside kitty, and somehow had avoided the usual predators all those years....


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11 Jan 2007, 5:14 pm

diaganolosis wrote:
Nobodies commented on my message yet :cry: I feel like I'm "stimming" myself here people... And it doesn't feel that bad :wink: But it could be better :P Someone must have missed the metaphor about vintage routemasters in London - such are the symptoms of AS.



If you sit down and watch a couple episodes of the 1960's "Twilight Zone", you'll be able to understand ANY metaphor, trust me. :)



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27 Jan 2007, 11:07 am

I am a published writer, mainly short stories and poetry. My biggest accomplishment to date was seeing my name in the table of contents (anthology) alongside Stephen King. :D



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28 Jan 2007, 6:00 pm

diaganolosis wrote:
Hey guys
I'm interested in the benefits that come from writing social interaction by those with AS. Anyone have experience using this as a device to understand and relate to people ? I don't know if there's a thread for this yet, but basically I'm interested in the whole idea of art as therapy. Whether it be crafting complex metaphors in poetry or finding unlikely humor; surely this must have some long term value for managing AS symptoms. Singing or music practice, for example, might also help those with awkward or innapropriate speaking methods.

I also sometimes wonder what important literary contribution will IMO eventually be made by someone from the AS community. I believe there hasn't yet been one but will be - I'm skeptical of those famous AS lists that name drop famous authors. IMO the "Great aspergian novel" will be probably be heavily autobiographical and insular. The fact that Spielberg was interested in "Mozart and the Whale" is a good indication of the artistic possibilities of the AS struggle. So, yes I'm obviously interested in writing social interaction and think's it's helpful, but I think that sticking to our strengths are what will get us noticed.

I think that all it would take is for a movie or novel to achieve the same popularity and cultural resonance of something like a Garden state. Young people who saw that movie found themself sympathising with depression and appreciating a subtle introspective perspective on the world. Most importantly - they seem to do this with genuine affinity for the characters rather than in a detached and condescending way. For the record, I don't believe Mozart and the whale (book or movie) satisfies the criteria of what I was talking about. I see efforts like these as confined to their chosen "slice of life" and lacking the broad appeal I'm hinting at.

Oh and sorry if I got off topic with the second part....



If you want to connect through writing/art/music, I think that's great and hope that works for you. I would guess that it could. Personally, although I majored in Creative Writing for both my degrees and like to talk to writers, I have no use for publishers or readers. I think for me that crosses that boundary of social interaction into random social interaction. The few times I've done that, while artistically successful, have been so taxing to me that I won't write for months or years afterward.

I've always thought Dickinson was AS, probably because I could identify with her. I also always thought Poe was AS. There are probably many more if I thought about it.


Writing works for me as therapy in the act itself. I like to write about what I see in my head. That's why I do it. I don't do it to reach out to the external world at all, in fact the opposite is true for me.



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16 Feb 2007, 3:14 am

I'm 90% sure that Emily Dickinson was AS. The reason is stupid. My mom has this "birthday book" that describes what people born on certain days are like, and I happen to be born on the same day as Emily Dickinson, and the book happens to nail my (aspie) personality spot on. Really, I don't believe in astrology, but it's pretty amazing. It says in the beginning of the book that the descriptions go off of known personalities of people born on certain days, and since Emily Dickinson is the only person of note born on Dec 10th, I think they went off her. (I'm also familiar with some of her biography). Sorry to go OT.



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17 Feb 2007, 10:33 am

xon wrote:
I have written some science fiction stories before, ranging from short stories to attempts at a novel. Once, I left a couple of my stories on a table in my dorm commons room to see if anyone would say something to me about them. No one did respond, so I can either believe no one read them or believe that they were terrible and those who may have read them didn't want to tell me that. Though school, work, and even my hours spent daily on WP have deterred me from starting any new writings of purely self-interest (except for one, a fictional treatise on the history of an mid-Atlantic island nation), I have considered that in the future, after I finish my computer science Bachelor's degree, I might write science fiction as a career. I would want to "test the waters" before jumping into science fiction writing, of course. One of my concerns about going into writing as a career, that is, with the intent to make money off of stories that are popular, is the fact that in most cases individuals with Asperger's Syndrome have difficulty in social interaction and, although it is by no means a requirement of social interaction that there be social interaction between or among any of the human characters, in much of the popular fiction today by such authors as John Gresham, David Brown, Nora Roberts, Stephen King, especially, and etc., it does play a very important role.

A question I have for you all is do you think that someone with Asperger's Syndrome can become a successful author even with his difficulties in social interaction, which may be reflected in his writing, especially in the dialogue?

Another question: Does anyone know of any successful writers who have or have been suspected to have Asperger's Syndrome?

EDIT: clarity


Having met Anne Rice, I would highly suspect that she has it. I don't even believe such a diagnosis would surprise her. I would also suspect that Stephen King and his wife both have it.


You don't have to be social unless you want to go on book signings. I couldn't do that since there are crowds, lights, noise and people handing you their books to sign and expecting you to talk to them. That could be difficult, but I think it depends on your place in the spectrum.

You just have to think about yourself in terms of publishing. How are you going to feel when an editor edits your work? What will you do if a publisher tells you to complete rewrite it to make it popular (or marketable). How will you respond if you are told it's marketable? These might not be issues for you because your motivation seems to be to get the work out there and get it sold. You want to make money doing it. If that is the core of your motivation, the rest should follow. My suggestion to you is to take Creative Writing classes so that other writers can dissect your work and help you to improve it. They can also help you with ways to get published.


My reason for telling you these things is that for me, publishing as a business is repulsive. Too much happens to work as a result of it being a business that I simply won't deal with or support. Having a professor and advisor tell me that I was the most marketable of the students in a Creative Writing class caused me to stop writing for two years. I destroyed everything I had written to that point. I still can't deal with that. It happened to me again about a month ago and caused me to stop writing what I was working on. I had tried publishing online and now I simply refuse to even look at it. To me, publishing my work has always been something I viewed as whoring my art and I simply can't stand that thought.

That is probably tied up in my AS, but it has much to do with where I am on the spectrum and my own personality. I avoid NT people and they really bother me, so when one says something like that to me, it indicates they like my writing and I take that as an insult because I don't really connect with them. As a result, I don't want them connecting with my writing. Does that make sense? To do that for money would be particularly repulsive to me.

That leads to the other reason I don't even try to publish (although I've written my entire life except for my two year meltdown) is because of the loss of control. No one in the United States reads the original version of Burgess' A Clockwork Orange because the entire last chapter was taken out in the U.S. when it was published. It has been that way since. You would have to know that and order it from abroad to get the original. That one publisher decision alters the entire meaning of the book. You can't read any original Emily Dickinson because it was all changed to make it palatable to the masses when her relative had it published. That is frighteningly ironic when you consider that Dickinson tried to publish a few times and stopped because she didn't want her work altered by publishers to make it marketable. Then, her relative turns around and does exactly the thing she did not want done. I could go on because this has happened to all published writers, but it would be more of the same.

So, it depends on motivation I think. You have to be motivated by money and approval of your work by others to want to publish. If you don't desire those things, you will be in for a sad letdown.