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GoonSquad
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20 Apr 2013, 8:04 am

King David's Spaceship

I just finished A Mote in God's Eye, but I'm still stuck in the Codominium universe...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CoDominium

Meanwhile, on Samuel's World:

Quote:
In the time of John Christian Falkenberg, the explosion of humanity into space was followed by a galaxy-wide technological collapse.

Since the Fall, King David's people have regained an early-industrial age technology, but another planet has progressed faster, and it's imperial Navy has discovered them. If his people are not to spend the rest of their history as just another satrapy, they must prove that they can reach space unaided. Though they have just re-invented the steam engine, King David will have his spaceship.


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duncvis
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20 Apr 2013, 6:11 pm

Just finished White Noise by Don DeLillo. I found it bleak and a bit depressing, without the humanity of say, Douglas Coupland's existential musings. Won't be rereading this one, well done but not to my taste.


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StarTrekker
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21 Apr 2013, 1:57 am

Rainbow-Squirrel wrote:
Extremely loud & incredibly close (in italian), by Jonathan Safran Foer. It's a wonderful book. The main carachter, a weird boy called Oskar, seems to have Aspie traits


I saw this movie, I loved it, and as an added bonus it had Tom Hanks, one of my favourite American actors in it. As for books, I'm currently reading Going After Cacciato for my lit class. It's good, I like it, but it can get a bit graphic at times.


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techstepgenr8tion
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22 Apr 2013, 11:10 pm

Exo-Vaticana by Tom Horn and Christ Putnam

http://www.amazon.com/Exo-Vaticana-Roma ... o-vaticana

Definitely not light reading, particularly before bedtime.



MakaylaTheAspie
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23 Apr 2013, 3:22 pm

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

My English teacher gave it to me and said I might like it. So far, I do.


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23 Apr 2013, 6:44 pm

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Jory
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27 Apr 2013, 12:43 pm

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Adamantius
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27 Apr 2013, 2:08 pm

Start by Jon Acuff



puddingmouse
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27 Apr 2013, 2:13 pm

MakaylaTheAspie wrote:
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

My English teacher gave it to me and said I might like it. So far, I do.


Everybody's happy nowadays, you know. Better than 1984, imo.

I'll always have a soft spot for Huxley's Ape and Essence, probably once of the worst and weirdest books ever written (it has orgies and baby sacrifice in it).


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Draka
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27 Apr 2013, 9:57 pm

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman



Jory
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11 May 2013, 6:55 pm

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GoonSquad
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13 May 2013, 10:42 am

GoonSquad wrote:
King David's Spaceship

I just finished A Mote in God's Eye, but I'm still stuck in the Codominium universe...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CoDominium

Meanwhile, on Samuel's World:

Quote:
In the time of John Christian Falkenberg, the explosion of humanity into space was followed by a galaxy-wide technological collapse.

Since the Fall, King David's people have regained an early-industrial age technology, but another planet has progressed faster, and it's imperial Navy has discovered them. If his people are not to spend the rest of their history as just another satrapy, they must prove that they can reach space unaided. Though they have just re-invented the steam engine, King David will have his spaceship.


So, I finally finished this book yesterday (was busy with finals/forgot I was reading it :wink: ).

It was pretty good. I think I liked it better than The Mote in God's Eye.

Now, I'm gonna catch up on my unread issues of Analog (I have about a year's worth on my tablet! :oops: ).

I'm also gonna read The Working Poor again...

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1109 ... rking_Poor

Quote:
As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work. But their version of the American Dream is a nightmare: low-paying, dead-end jobs; the profound failure of government to improve upon decaying housing, health care, and education; the failure of families to break the patterns of child abuse and substance abuse. Shipler exposes the interlocking problems by taking us into the sorrowful, infuriating, courageous lives of the poor—white and black, Asian and Latino, citizens and immigrants. We encounter them every day, for they do jobs essential to the American economy...


This is a book everyone should read.


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Jory
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13 May 2013, 12:33 pm

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GeOrg
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14 May 2013, 9:11 am

Three books at the moment:

Seksin mediamarkkinat (in English it would be something like "The media market of sex", if that makes any sense... but it's about sex and gender and sexuality in (Finnish) media) by Sanna Karkulehto

Puhdistus ("Purge") by Sofi Oksanen

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh



aleclair
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14 May 2013, 8:43 pm

A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel.

Apparently a modern classic in investing theory for individual investors; it's an interesting meeting point between theory (e.g. capital asset pricing model) and practice (e.g. tax considerations for individual investors in various brackets). Lots of interesting things, and I am genuinely surprised that the strategy of "buy and hold the index" that is so omnipresent these days wasn't that known in the '70s, when the first edition of this book was published. At some later points the book is essentially an ad for Vanguard mutual funds, but I can look over that since Vanguard's funds are what essentially allowed this stuff to go mainstream.

I wouldn't recommend unless you have some investing knowledge or experience -- the author throws out lots of jargon without explanation -- but the perspective provided by this book was eye opening for me, in terms of thinking about financing the future.