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KnucklesUK
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10 Sep 2010, 5:45 pm

The Montauk Project: Experiments In Time by Preston B. Nichols.

Its a great book so far, its about an alleged project at the Montauk Air Force Base in Long Island that was continued on from "The Philadelphia Experiment", where they conducted research on mind-control and time travel.

The science in it just baffles me though. :P



Ambivalence
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10 Sep 2010, 6:32 pm

KnucklesUK wrote:
The science in it just baffles me though. :P


Likely because the author made up rubbish that sounds good. ^^


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KnucklesUK
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12 Sep 2010, 3:49 pm

Ambivalence wrote:
KnucklesUK wrote:
The science in it just baffles me though. :P


Likely because the author made up rubbish that sounds good. ^^
...Or did he!? :P



Ackman
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12 Sep 2010, 3:52 pm

Angela Brazil books.



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12 Sep 2010, 7:20 pm

Steppenwolfe by Hermann Hesse. Long overdue.


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12 Sep 2010, 10:31 pm

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (Stieg Larsson)

moog, i have read a lot of Hesse's books (let's see - Demian, Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, Gertrude, Siddhartha, and Rosshalde i think). been meaning to read The Glass Bead Game.

one of my favorite quotes ( i think this is from gertrude):
"The artist is not, as ordinary people think, a gay sort of person who flings off works of art here and there out of sheer exhuberance. Unfortunately he is usually a poor soul who is being suffocated with surplus riches and therefore has to give some of them away. It is a fallacy that there are happy artists; that is just philistines' talk. Lighthearted Mozart kept up his spirits with champagne and was constantly short of bread, and why Beethoven did not commit suicide in his youth instead of composing all that wonderful music, no one knows. A real artist has to be unhappy. Whenever he is hungry and opens his bag, there are pearls inside it."


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12 Sep 2010, 11:25 pm

Dune : First time read. Love it, even though I couldn't tolerate 20 minutes of the film | Mocking Jay: just started, only on chapter 4 or so. So far, it doesn't meet the interesting but quick pace of the previous books. We'll see!

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13 Sep 2010, 4:31 am

katzefrau wrote:
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (Stieg Larsson)

moog, i have read a lot of Hesse's books (let's see - Demian, Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, Gertrude, Siddhartha, and Rosshalde i think). been meaning to read The Glass Bead Game.

one of my favorite quotes ( i think this is from gertrude):
"The artist is not, as ordinary people think, a gay sort of person who flings off works of art here and there out of sheer exhuberance. Unfortunately he is usually a poor soul who is being suffocated with surplus riches and therefore has to give some of them away. It is a fallacy that there are happy artists; that is just philistines' talk. Lighthearted Mozart kept up his spirits with champagne and was constantly short of bread, and why Beethoven did not commit suicide in his youth instead of composing all that wonderful music, no one knows. A real artist has to be unhappy. Whenever he is hungry and opens his bag, there are pearls inside it."


Ah, katzefrau, I am not suprised that you like Hesse. :-)

I've only read Demian and Siddartha so far, both are wonderful books.

Thank you for the quote. I am not sure if it's quite true, but I am not an artist anymore.

I've been making a little index of page numbers where I found something that strikes a chord with me in Steppenwolf.

I just read this; "Eternity is just the redemption of time, it's return to innocence, so to say, and it's transformation back again into space" There was a recent cosmological theory that circulated the internet recently with the premise that the universe may indeed do exactly that. It made me laugh to find it written here in this book.


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13 Sep 2010, 1:08 pm

ProfessorCrow wrote:
Dune : First time read. Love it, even though I couldn't tolerate 20 minutes of the film | Mocking Jay: just started, only on chapter 4 or so. So far, it doesn't meet the interesting but quick pace of the previous books. We'll see!

-Crow


Dune (the movie) is so much better after you've read the book, and yet, still, cannot hold a candle to the book which is absolutely wonderful. I also recommend the 5 sequels (the ones that Frank Herbert wrote, not the bastardized offerings from his son Brian) - the first (Dune Messiah) and the last (Chapterhouse: Dune) were my favorites, but the others are good too.



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13 Sep 2010, 3:09 pm

Moog wrote:
katzefrau wrote:
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (Stieg Larsson)

moog, i have read a lot of Hesse's books (let's see - Demian, Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, Gertrude, Siddhartha, and Rosshalde i think). been meaning to read The Glass Bead Game.

one of my favorite quotes ( i think this is from gertrude):
"The artist is not, as ordinary people think, a gay sort of person who flings off works of art here and there out of sheer exhuberance. Unfortunately he is usually a poor soul who is being suffocated with surplus riches and therefore has to give some of them away. It is a fallacy that there are happy artists; that is just philistines' talk. Lighthearted Mozart kept up his spirits with champagne and was constantly short of bread, and why Beethoven did not commit suicide in his youth instead of composing all that wonderful music, no one knows. A real artist has to be unhappy. Whenever he is hungry and opens his bag, there are pearls inside it."


Ah, katzefrau, I am not suprised that you like Hesse. :-)

I've only read Demian and Siddartha so far, both are wonderful books.

Thank you for the quote. I am not sure if it's quite true, but I am not an artist anymore.

I've been making a little index of page numbers where I found something that strikes a chord with me in Steppenwolf.

I just read this; "Eternity is just the redemption of time, it's return to innocence, so to say, and it's transformation back again into space" There was a recent cosmological theory that circulated the internet recently with the premise that the universe may indeed do exactly that. It made me laugh to find it written here in this book.



Right now I'm reading non-fiction, The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins (from where I plan on reading The Greatest Show on Earth. Before this book I read God is not Great by Christopher Hitchens, and after all listed, I will be trying to get a copy of Stephen Hawking's The Grand Design).

But when I was younger, I poured through Hesse and Dostoevsky as a daily ritual. Demian is an AMAZING book that opened my eyes to the concept of Taoism when I was barely ten years old, which is sort of related to what he calls Abraxas--- there should be neither light nor dark, rather a balance of the two coexisting in perfect harmony.

Dostoevsky is by far my favorite author, though. The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment were exquisite for a plethora of reasons. Any other Dostoevsky fans, or am I nutter?



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13 Sep 2010, 3:26 pm

UnderINK wrote:
Dostoevsky is by far my favorite author, though. The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment were exquisite for a plethora of reasons. Any other Dostoevsky fans, or am I nutter?


I wouldn't call you a nutter, but Crime and Punishment defeated me with boredom after about half way. :)

Am reading Line War at the moment, soon to be followed by Matterhorn, which looks interesting.


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13 Sep 2010, 3:33 pm

Image


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13 Sep 2010, 6:44 pm

Ambivalence wrote:
UnderINK wrote:
Dostoevsky is by far my favorite author, though. The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment were exquisite for a plethora of reasons. Any other Dostoevsky fans, or am I nutter?


I wouldn't call you a nutter, but Crime and Punishment defeated me with boredom after about half way. :)


Crime and Punishment bored me from the minute I opened it, and didn't stop.

I liked Notes from the Underground a lot more.

I might try something else by him.

I loved Demian by the way, UnderINK. I would even describe it as life changing. I really needed that book when I found it.


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13 Sep 2010, 8:11 pm

skafather84 wrote:
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Oh, Games People Play is one of my favorites!! !

Right now I'm reading The Noble Eight Fold Path by Bikkhu Bodhi. Amazing.



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13 Sep 2010, 9:42 pm

UnderINK wrote:
Any other Dostoevsky fans, or am I nutter?


love Dostoevsky as well, but have only read the short works: Notes From the Underground, A Gentle Creature, Poor Folk, The Double
and a few others.

i actually have a lot of trouble reading. the words flicker / swim. :(

(don't make much sense of spoken words either, so books on tape = not an option. i just read about 1/4 as often as i would like)

oh yes, and i forget everything i read instantly. it's really a drag. i keep everything i like, to read again. (by the end of a book, i have forgotten how it began)


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13 Sep 2010, 9:49 pm

I've read Crime & Punishment and Notes From Underground by him. Is The Brothers Karamazov a good choice to read next?

I'm still reading The Superorganism about eusocial insects. But I also started The Gods Will Have Blood by Anatole France today. The other day I finished rereading Titus Groan by Mervyn Peake-- his books are my favorite books.