Does any autistic person here like to read drama?

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starkid
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26 Oct 2020, 11:01 pm

I mean novels that are mainly about people and their social relationships. Not sci-fi, mystery, horror, etc. Just people dating, marrying, divorcing, arguing, raising kids, back-stabbing, worrying about other people's opinions, rebelling against their parents, trying to please their parents, and stuff like that.

It seems like such a neurotypical thing to me, people who are so interested in people that they can read a whole novel that's nothing but drama. I get really bored with drama, so it's weird and interesting to think about other people liking it.



malavois
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27 Oct 2020, 1:03 am

If it’s well-written I do.



traven
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27 Oct 2020, 3:18 am

i like reading but nothing scififantasyhorror
so most nothing made after 2000 (),

there maybe some;
The Kite Runner, Millennium-trilogy, The Prague Cemetery, Vivre pour la raconter(Living to Tell the Tale),
Kader Abdolah(dutch)
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Joe90
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27 Oct 2020, 11:03 am

starkid wrote:
I mean novels that are mainly about people and their social relationships. Not sci-fi, mystery, horror, etc. Just people dating, marrying, divorcing, arguing, raising kids, back-stabbing, worrying about other people's opinions, rebelling against their parents, trying to please their parents, and stuff like that.

It seems like such a neurotypical thing to me, people who are so interested in people that they can read a whole novel that's nothing but drama. I get really bored with drama, so it's weird and interesting to think about other people liking it.


That's the only thing I DO read about (which is why I enjoy reading women's magazines). I love drama and real life situations. I also enjoy sitcoms because they can often involve a lot of social interaction (with some exceptions such as Mr Bean).
I like writing and my stories are all based on social interaction, emotions, relationships, etc. It all interests me.


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Spunge42
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27 Oct 2020, 11:44 pm

starkid wrote:
I mean novels that are mainly about people and their social relationships. Not sci-fi, mystery, horror, etc. Just people dating, marrying, divorcing, arguing, raising kids, back-stabbing, worrying about other people's opinions, rebelling against their parents, trying to please their parents, and stuff like that.

It seems like such a neurotypical thing to me, people who are so interested in people that they can read a whole novel that's nothing but drama. I get really bored with drama, so it's weird and interesting to think about other people liking it.


I get what you're saying, too much drama is exhausting to me. I love mysteries, especially British ones. I've stopped watching some detective shows because after a few seasons they start to add a lot of unnecessary drama, like a ridiculous amount. A little is ok but at some point its too much and I can't focus on the rest of the story. I dont really like sitcoms, or daytime talk shows for that reason.

I do like Jane Austen books though. Hmm. Maybe because in her books she doesn't take it to an assinin level. So I suppose when its well written and helps move the story forward I enjoy some drama. But when its added just for drama sake and doesn't add any intelligent insight into a character I'm not a fan. I do like stories that are essentially character studies, because there is a point to them. It can help understand others.

I'm not sure if I explained that well.


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GGPViper
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29 Oct 2020, 6:37 am

starkid wrote:
I mean novels that are mainly about people and their social relationships. Not sci-fi, mystery, horror, etc. Just people dating, marrying, divorcing, arguing, raising kids, back-stabbing, worrying about other people's opinions, rebelling against their parents, trying to please their parents, and stuff like that.

It seems like such a neurotypical thing to me, people who are so interested in people that they can read a whole novel that's nothing but drama. I get really bored with drama, so it's weird and interesting to think about other people liking it.

I very much agree with this. And it frustrates me that so many great works of literature involve concepts that have little or no meaning to me.

For instance, I recently purchased The Sound and The Fury by William Faulkner and Beloved by Toni Morrison… Both are highly celebrated works by Nobel laureates… but I couldn't make it past 20 pages in either book due to so much family drama. So now they are just gathering dust on my bookshelf…

H. P. Lovecraft, on the other hand, is - in my opinion - not a technically skilled writer, but I read a compilation of all his horror short stories in one setting because I simply couldn't put it down. I basically did the same with Edgar Allan Poe (who basically invented both the detective and horror story), and while Poe also writes about family drama, his dramas are usually unusually violent (and short)…

As a result, I also find a lot of novels to be too long. I have frequently felt that the plot of a 400 page book could have been done in 200 pages - simply because I find several of the themes about family, social relations, romance etc. to be meaningless "filler".

Give me some Hemingway instead: Go fishing, wrestle with marlin, punch sharks, go home...



starkid
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31 Oct 2020, 1:13 pm

GGPViper wrote:
And it frustrates me that so many great works of literature involve concepts that have little or no meaning to me.

I just avoid "literature." I've learned that most books considered to be literature are boring.

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H. P. Lovecraft, on the other hand, is - in my opinion - not a technically skilled writer, but I read a compilation of all his horror short stories in one setting because I simply couldn't put it down.

I find him skilled. His descriptions are clear and engaging despite the weirdness of his subject matter. That takes skill. His stories are entertaining; that takes skill, although what is entertaining is somewhat subjective. Also, like a lot of older authors, he has a vocabulary that is superior to that of contemporary writers.

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As a result, I also find a lot of novels to be too long. I have frequently felt that the plot of a 400 page book could have been done in 200 pages - simply because I find several of the themes about family, social relations, romance etc. to be meaningless "filler".

Yeah me too.