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txfz1
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03 Jan 2022, 6:41 pm

I'm wanting to improve my writing skills as I have recently enjoyed writing for a blog. My first real writing or learning was late in life as I was an older college student. When I was working, I wrote technical procedures, project requirements, and reports. I enjoyed it but never put any real effort into improving the skill/craft. Now I want to improve and to write more better. :)

I read mostly non-fiction and listen to fiction. I'm looking for a storyteller writer that has a flow to the words or a rhythm, so I can dissect their work. If you suggest Shakespeare, I will hunt you down and dissect you. I like reading him aloud but I will forever be confused about the message. I also liked Stephen Kings' storytelling skills in his early work. Any suggestions?

I'm also looking for a writing partner or mentor. When working, my writing was reviewed by either a supervisor or another project team member. These just produced the final draft due to time constraints but sometimes constructive criticism was provided. PM me if interested.

I'll look into finding a night class or workshop once I'm settled somewhere for a season.

I write mostly about my art (photography), aspiesness (I'm moving away from it or writing less about it), culture, and travel.

Any suggestions on ways that you have improved would also be helpful to me.



Kraichgauer
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04 Jan 2022, 2:33 am

Faulkner suggested reading everything from the classics to trash. That way, you'll know the difference between good and bad writing.


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HighLlama
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04 Jan 2022, 5:45 am

I would recommend Balzac, Hawthorne, and Melville, for starters. They are stylish, but fairly concrete. Borges and Kafka, too. Raymond Chandler, if you like detective stories. Anita Brookner is economical and engaging. Junichiro Tanazaki has some great novels.

What do you like about Shakespeare if you're confused by the message?



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04 Jan 2022, 6:50 am

How about Hemmingway, Vonnegut, and Bukowski, to name a few?

/Mats


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txfz1
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04 Jan 2022, 12:05 pm

HighLlama wrote:
I would recommend Balzac, Hawthorne, and Melville, for starters. They are stylish, but fairly concrete. Borges and Kafka, too. Raymond Chandler, if you like detective stories. Anita Brookner is economical and engaging. Junichiro Tanazaki has some great novels.

What do you like about Shakespeare if you're confused by the message?


Reading his sonnets and in general poetry is difficult for me. I'm too literal and have a hard time with allegory. I have to think about it when I read, this puts me into a single focus mindframe when I should be open. For technical, I have to read paragraphs three times, first scan, then again, and final read to find answers to any questions. As for your question, I like the old school wording and I do get it, I just don't know what "it" is that I got. Another is trust, I will always have a doubt about others intentions or meanings, as I've learned not to trust myself.

I like Raymond Chandler and he is the inspiration for most of my detective writers that I follow; Michael Connelly, Craig Johnson, CJ Box.

TY for the suggestions.

Kraichgauer wrote:
Faulkner suggested reading everything from the classics to trash. That way, you'll know the difference between good and bad writing.


So true and I remember reading the penthouse letters, talk about trash!


mohsart wrote:
How about Hemmingway, Vonnegut, and Bukowski, to name a few?

/Mats


I've read Hemmingway and he would be a great choice to dissect. TY



Dvdz
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26 Jun 2022, 5:40 pm

Brandon Sanderson, one of the bestselling fantasy/sf authors right now, has his lectures on writing up on his youtube channel.

First lecture:


It's a good watch even if you are not writing fantasy/sf