80% of aspies fail out/unemployed after 4+years of college

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RetroGamer87
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11 Mar 2018, 2:05 am

We live in an increasingly competitive world. Being part of the bottom 80% is not enough.


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auntblabby
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11 Mar 2018, 2:57 am

a great failure in my life was in being totally at sea in college, not knowing what I was doing there, not knowing how to navigate it, not knowing the destination. I felt like a stranger in a strange land, everybody else had an agenda they were following to a T, and I was just wandering without a clue as to how to conform.



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11 Mar 2018, 3:04 am

College was the biggest waste of time for me.

Now I think my hope is getting help finding a job through some sort of service to help disabled people. I've contacted a place that seems to have programs that would help me so hopefully I will hear back and be able to go through their program. I mean some of it may be mudane and difficult but I need to do something for myself to try and get into the workforce to make more income. 730 a month really just isn't enough to pay bills and live on, if I wasn't living with my boyfriend I'd have to live at my moms house or in subsidized housing because there would be no way for me to afford rent myself on SSI otherwise. It's a struggle as is, this month I have roughly 7.00 a day after bills.

I have 220 left in savings, so if need be I can supplement it with that, but once that 220 is gone, its gone.



auntblabby
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11 Mar 2018, 3:35 am

after I failed at college, one of my profs saw me at work in a sheltered workshop [Goodwill] for intellectually disabled folk, and he wondered what in the hell I was doing there.



apus apus
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11 Mar 2018, 4:49 am

So first I was at the university I studied physics in a special group for gifted students. It's been noticed that something was "wrong" with me and I got so much help and support... but failed out anyway. Then there was 2,5 years when I had no idea what to do. Then I decided to return to a university to study just anything that at least has some math in it and I chose econometrics (was too ashamed to return to physics). In Poland it's 3 years of bachelor's equivalent and 2 years of master's and I'm on my first year of master's now.



auntblabby
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11 Mar 2018, 5:00 am

I wish I knew how to be successful. :|



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15 Mar 2018, 10:30 am

I have wondered if this school thing that I am doing is going to work out in the long run, but not going back to school wasn't working out, so going back to school seemed like the only choice that I had. Every job I have had has been tough for me, so I wanted to be able to get a job where I could make a lot per hour so I could work fewer hours because of the stress of working.

I'm sorry so many of you are having a hard time with school and work. It is really hard.


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magz
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15 Mar 2018, 10:38 am

apus apus wrote:
So first I was at the university I studied physics in a special group for gifted students. It's been noticed that something was "wrong" with me and I got so much help and support... but failed out anyway. Then there was 2,5 years when I had no idea what to do. Then I decided to return to a university to study just anything that at least has some math in it and I chose econometrics (was too ashamed to return to physics). In Poland it's 3 years of bachelor's equivalent and 2 years of master's and I'm on my first year of master's now.

The R course?
I guess half of the people there have more or less severe symptoms of ASD. And 1/3 of them have severe dysgraphia, based on checking their tests ;)
Pity you didn't come back. I did after falling out for 4 years, finished the MS and was offered grad studies. The Faculty of Physics is the most Aspie-friendly (and generally neurodiverse-friendly) place I know!


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shortfatbalduglyman
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16 Mar 2018, 2:44 pm

Where does the figure 80 percent come from?

Undiagnosed Aspies could not be taken into account



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Blue Jay
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16 Mar 2018, 4:13 pm

magz wrote:
The R course?

Yes
magz wrote:
I guess half of the people there have more or less severe symptoms of ASD.

Perhaps
magz wrote:
Pity you didn't come back. I did after falling out for 4 years, finished the MS and was offered grad studies.

Good for you!
magz wrote:
The Faculty of Physics is the most Aspie-friendly (and generally neurodiverse-friendly) place I know!

Indeed, FUW is really neurodiverse-friendly.



TiredMom
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17 Mar 2018, 1:57 pm

Based on my own experience as a professor, and my daughter's experience as a student, colleges and universities are very unfriendly to autistics. The environment is even louder, brighter and more crowded than high school. Dormitories (sometimes students are required to live there) are a nightmare. The faculty and administration are simply unfamiliar with autistic people's learning needs and some are hostile to accommodations. However, if you have a really good advocate in the disabilities office, it is possible to make it through. Don't give up hope.