Hypothetical Situation about Cognitive Development

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Abstract_Logic
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12 Jun 2009, 5:06 am

While learning about Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration, I began to wonder how our minds would have developed if evolution took on a totally different course. What if our world evolved differently, more differently than we can imagine? Would our minds have developed in the same manner as they are currently? Or would our brains have a totally different function than what we are used to now? If the development of an intelligent mind is precipitated by experience, it would make sense to say that an individual who has experienced the force of gravity on the moon would have a slightly higher developed mind than the individuals who have remain earthbound for their entire lives.

Imagine a hypothetical scenario where only a certain amount of earthlings have inhabited the moon. While living on the moon, these individuals began developing a civilization (they began breeding, etc.). Would their offspring have a different form of cognition due to the environmental circumstances in which they have been born and raised? In essence, would they think differently than humans on earth? Of course, due to cultural limitations, they would have a different view of life, after-all having been born and raised on the moon. But the cognitive differences I'm referring to here have a much more complex nature than what certain cultures limit themselves to. I hypothesize that the environmental conditions of the moon would have a much more deeper, complex effect on the cognitive development of its natives than the cognitive differences due to cultural conditions. Therefore, humans born on the moon (or any other planet for that matter) would perceive and conceive of reality in an intrinsically unique manner than the persons born on Earth. I believe the environment can have a profound effect on the way brains develop in humans, or even chimpanzees or dogs or whatever.



Dionysus
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12 Jun 2009, 6:07 am

Hm thats an interesting concept although I'm not entirely sure I'd agree with it. As far as I understand there would be basic biological feature from evolution and then cultural influences as a result of the gravity. Perhaps if they existed there for an evolutionarily significant amount of time or evolved there in the first place. However I'm not familiar with Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration so i could be way off the mark.



monty
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12 Jun 2009, 9:07 am

Abstract_Logic wrote:
If the development of an intelligent mind is precipitated by experience, it would make sense to say that an individual who has experienced the force of gravity on the moon would have a slightly higher developed mind than the individuals who have remain earthbound for their entire lives.


Well, sure, but it would also be fair to say that art, athletics, math, music, travel, learning languages, and many other factors all can have a much bigger effect on developing the mind.

Over time, low gravity would favor certain types of genetic change - not sure exactly how.