Page 1 of 1 [ 12 posts ] 

Tory_canuck
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2009
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,373
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada

17 Jun 2009, 1:11 am

http://www.albertalocalnews.com/reddeer ... 53787.html


Quote:
Airdrie war memorial damaged


Vandals have struck a war memorial in Airdrie.

During the weekend, a cross that used to sit at the top of the cenotaph was found in pieces on the ground.

Park workers notified police about the damage when they found the crushed granite cross on Monday.

Federal Veterans Affairs Minister Greg Thompson says the senseless damage “dishonours the memory of these brave men and women.”

He also says it inflicts pain and sadness onto the entire community.

RCMP investigating the incident say the vandals had to use a great deal of force to cause the damage.

“It appears it was an act of malicious vandalism. The wind certainly wouldn’t blow it over,” says Sgt. Damon Poole.


_________________
Honour over deciet, merit over luck, courage over popularity, duty over entitlement...dont let the cliques fool you for they have no honour...only superficial deceit.

ALBERTAN...and DAMN PROUD OF IT!!


sartresue
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Age: 66
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,313
Location: The Castle of Shock and Awe-tism

17 Jun 2009, 8:25 pm

Cowardly vandalism topic

This ranks right down there with cemetery defilement, headstone topping and grave robbing.

Once found and convicted, there should be zero tolerance. :x


_________________
Radiant Aspergian
Awe-Tistic Whirlwind

Phuture Phounder of the Philosophy Phactory

NOT a believer of Mystic Woo-Woo


AnonymousAnonymous
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 59,614
Location: Portland, Oregon

17 Jun 2009, 10:09 pm

One of most disrespectful things a person can do.

I don't believe in war, but trashing a war memorial?
This is the biggest piss on those who fought and were killed in combat.


_________________
Silly NTs, I have Aspergers, and having Aspergers is gr-r-reat!


Tory_canuck
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2009
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,373
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada

17 Jun 2009, 10:21 pm

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2 ... alpee.html

Quote:
Police seeking revellers who urinated on Ottawa memorial
Last Updated: Monday, July 3, 2006 | 10:38 AM ET
CBC News
Ottawa police are looking for three Canada Day revellers photographed urinating on the National War Memorial.

Police have asked anyone with information about the three to come forward.



A man relieves himself on the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Saturday.
(Michael Pilon/Canadian Press)
Det. Mike Walker said police have contacted the photographer, retired Canadian Armed Forces Maj. Michael Pilon, and will ensure charges are laid.

Pilon's picture, taken around 11 p.m. on July 1 after a fireworks display ended, has prompted outrage.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper called an Ottawa radio station and said the action was "thoughtless," but "it doesn't represent the views of any segment of Canadian society, we all strongly honour our vets."



Prime Minister Stephen Harper, above, hosted a huge ceremony at the national war monument in Ottawa hours before other people were spotted urinating on the memorial.
(Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)
Police said they could lay charges of mischief, being drunk in a public place and performing an indecent act in a public place.

Veterans want security for monument

The incident has renewed calls by veterans groups for better security to protect the memorial, located in the centre of Ottawa. It honours the country's war dead and holds the remains of The Unknown Soldier, returned to Canada from France in 2000.

"We've asked for people to be stationed here so that it can be stopped. And we'll be pressing for that in the future, and I must say that we'll be pressing much harder from now on," Royal Canadian Legion's Bob Butt said.

Pilon said he saw drunken revellers pouring beer on the site in 2005, and he's written to politicians and various government agencies in the past to ask that the monument be kept off limits on Canada Day, but without success.

This time, however, he's got pictures to support his pleas.

"I just happened to have my camera, and there they were. Quite eager to pose, I may add. I guess that's just one of the symptoms of having one beer too many."

The incidents came hours after Harper and Gov. Gen. Michaëlle Jean hosted a huge ceremony at the site.


_________________
Honour over deciet, merit over luck, courage over popularity, duty over entitlement...dont let the cliques fool you for they have no honour...only superficial deceit.

ALBERTAN...and DAMN PROUD OF IT!!


Tory_canuck
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2009
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,373
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada

17 Jun 2009, 10:24 pm

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2 ... eelaw.html

Quote:
War Memorial suspects are 2 Ottawa teens, visiting 23-year-old
Last Updated: Wednesday, July 5, 2006 | 11:57 AM ET
CBC News
Police say they have identified two Ottawa youths and a 23-year-old man from outside the city as the trio photographed urinating on the National War Memorial after a Canada Day fireworks display.

No names have been released, partly because charges have yet to be laid, Const. Steven Desjourdy told CBC Online.



Ottawa police say they have identified this man, photographed urinating on the War Memorial.
(Ottawa Police)
In addition, the youngsters' names are being withheld because of their ages, although their pictures have already been published and broadcast across Canada.

The Youth Criminal Justice Act prohibits publication of the names or photographs of accused persons under 18 in most circumstances.

The Canada Day images prompted outrage across the country and were posted on an Ottawa police website in hopes that someone would recognize the culprits and turn them in.

Police issued two statements in quick succession on Wednesday afternoon, the first saying that the youths had been identified and the second saying the man had been identified.

MP calls for new punishments

Meanwhile, an Ottawa MP is calling for changes to the Criminal Code that would lead to harsh punishments for people who defile war monuments.

David McGuinty spoke out Tuesday after the incident became a focus of anger among veterans.

The three could face charges under the Criminal Code, National Capital Commission rules or city bylaws.

But McGuinty, the Liberal member for Ottawa South, wants Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Justice Minister Vic Toews to create a new criminal offence that would specifically prohibit "mischief, vandalism or destruction" of Canada's war memorials. Fines should be substantial and penalties should include imprisonment, McGuinty said.

The incident has renewed calls by veterans groups for better security at the memorial, located near Parliament Hill. It honours the country's war dead and holds the remains of the Unknown Soldier, returned to Canada from France in 2000.

McGuinty backed the call for permanent guards at the site.

"Most countries for years now have had honour guards posted at their tombs of the Unknown Soldier, and I thought we should be doing the same," McGuinty said.

On Tuesday, an unemployed Ottawa man decided to take on the job himself. Dressed in red and holding a Royal Canadian Legion flag, Don Dawson spent hours in front of the memorial.

Like many Canadians, Dawson said, he was disgusted by the pictures.

'I was enraged'

"I was enraged. I was just infuriated," he said. "But after that subsided, I started to feel pretty bad. I felt pretty horrible about the whole thing. So I thought, what can I do?"

Still, he said he would like to see a real sentry on duty.

"Why can't we have one foot guard, standing here during the day for a couple hours to say: 'I remember you. Lest we forget.'"


The furor started when Michael Pilon, a retired major in the Canadian Forces, snapped photographs of the three young men about 11 p.m. on July 1 after a fireworks display had ended.


_________________
Honour over deciet, merit over luck, courage over popularity, duty over entitlement...dont let the cliques fool you for they have no honour...only superficial deceit.

ALBERTAN...and DAMN PROUD OF IT!!


dougn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 773

18 Jun 2009, 2:54 am

When I clicked on this I thought it meant Airdrie, Scotland, the existence of which I know about because I know someone who lives there. I didn't know there was one in Alberta.

I suppose this could also be construed as an anti-Christian hate crime since the object destroyed was a cross.

On another note, what exactly is your avatar? It's obviously a flag with the shield from the Alberta coat of arms, and the Big Dipper and North Star (as on the flag of Alaska), but aside from that, what is it? I like flags.



Tory_canuck
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2009
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,373
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada

18 Jun 2009, 2:02 pm

dougn wrote:
When I clicked on this I thought it meant Airdrie, Scotland, the existence of which I know about because I know someone who lives there. I didn't know there was one in Alberta.

I suppose this could also be construed as an anti-Christian hate crime since the object destroyed was a cross.

On another note, what exactly is your avatar? It's obviously a flag with the shield from the Alberta coat of arms, and the Big Dipper and North Star (as on the flag of Alaska), but aside from that, what is it? I like flags.



It is an Alberta Independance flag.It is flown by those in Alberta who wish for more provincial autonomy and to have a firewall to protect Alberta's finances from being taken by the Federal government and given to other provinces such as Quebec.

http://www.westernstandard.ca/website/a ... 39&start=1


Quote:
Luring people and investment should be Alberta's agendaIdeas born out of irritation--like the firewall proposals--are not necessarily the same as a proper game plan to reach desirable ends
Mark Milke - September 13, 2004
In 2001, six prominent Albertans, frustrated with the 2000 election--in which Jean Chretien's Liberals returned to power despite 18 ongoing criminal investigations--penned the famous "firewall" letter to Premier Ralph Klein. The group argued that Alberta should become more independent from Ottawa and offered multiple proposals to that end.

But ideas born out of irritation are not necessarily the same as a proper game plan to reach desirable ends. The Alberta government's recent response to the Alberta Agenda (as the firewall proposals became known), in the form of a province-wide consultation, and the early-August report on the same, rejected many of the original 2001 ideas, and in some cases with good reason.

The fact is, many firewall demands were mere posturing; others would have only added to Alberta's costs, and only one would actually meaningfully challenge Ottawa. None of the others would give Alberta (or the West) an increase in actual power relative to central and eastern Canada--power that would allow for sensible fiscal, foreign and social policy that respects and protects the region's historic, hard-won freedoms and traditions.

The blunt truth is that if westerners want a "power punch," we must obtain it the old-fashioned way: with more people, which translates into more federal seats. The West must become so compelling to new business and so desirable that the rest of the country must either imitate us or risk losing many of their brightest people, their most entrepreneurial businesses, their best jobs, and much of their potential new wealth to us.

This is why, for example, the firewall suggestion that Alberta should collect its own provincial personal income tax was and is a potentially expensive distraction. Alberta could never, as some erroneously believe, also collect federal tax in addition to its own provincial levies and send back to Ottawa what it chose. Given that Alberta claims it pays just $5 million annually to Ottawa to process millions of Alberta's provincial tax forms, and as the provincial committee pointed out, our own administrative costs for the collection of provincial income tax could reach as high as $160 million annually, it makes no sense for us to begin collecting our own taxes. All that would accomplish would be to let Ottawa off the hook for the few bills it does pay.

There are other agenda proposals that should be put aside, at least for now. While a Triple-E Senate is desirable, the West will not now get an equal, elected and effective Senate. And without equality, an elected Senate would be effective all right--for the regions that hold the majority of Senate seats, and that doesn't include the West. On the idea of dumping the RCMP in favour of a provincial police force, aren't conservatives supposed to respect tradition? Replacing a force that dates back to 1874 and is part of our western heritage is not conservative; it's more like vandalism to our traditions and to our history.

And as for an Alberta pension plan, it's true that the current Canada Pension Plan is unfair to younger workers (of which Alberta has plenty). Arguably, that should be changed, as should the governmental nature of the program. But unless Alberta is prepared to replace the CPP with a plan that actually addresses the intergenerational imbalance and that sets up individual accounts (a la private sector plans in Chile), there is little point in switching from one government plan to another.

Let's imagine Alberta did enact many firewall proposals. Suppose Alberta did have its own pension plan, its own cops, and that it collected its own income tax. Would this really make Ottawa quake in her nanny-state boots? Frankly, it is doubtful that the ministers and mandarins in our distant colonial capital would even notice or care.

That said, MLAs should press ahead on one original firewall proposal: that Alberta resume full responsibility for health care. Resuming full responsibility implies giving up federal cash transfers for health. But even if provincial Conservatives don't go that far, they should remember that the current Canada Health Act, which is about insurance and not delivery, cannot prevent Alberta from becoming the centre of private health care in this country. Every single health service could be performed in a private or nonprofit facility more effectively, efficiently, and with more flexibility for patients and staff.

Alberta could become a destination point for people around the world looking for excellent private health care. It might well attract international patients and private investment, research, world-class facilities and multiple new jobs. And the spillover effect would benefit Albertans because of increased choice, more medical professionals, and better facilities and equipment. A side benefit is that health care reform in Canada would happen as Alberta shows that private delivery is not harmful, but is, in fact, helpful to auniversal health care system.

In fact, in all areas, Alberta already has the means to use market-based policy innovations to increase its power. One new idea that firewall proponents should push and the provincial government should adopt, is a dramatic cut in business taxes. This year, business tax revenues in Alberta will total $2 billion, while the surplus might hit $4 billion. For starters, why not slash such taxes in half? Canada's businesses would beat a path to the province's door, more than they already do, including head office relocations.

And the political ramifications of that would be substantially more voters and ridings over time--voters who would likely be more entrepreneurial, and thus likely to favour conservative policies. People, after all, tend to vote for what works--and Alberta does. In the shorter term, however, Alberta's private sector success (including on health care) will become impossible for the rest of the country to ignore. Other provinces will be forced to imitate such policies or risk their own decline in relative terms. Either way, Alberta's agenda wins.

It's worth noting that former U.S. president Ronald Reagan didn't end the reign of lazy liberalism (at least in foreign and economic policy) because he had to cater to the northeastern states. He won some of those states in both 1980 and 1984 precisely because the West and South, where he garnered the most support, were growing in population. George W. Bush's win in 2000 came largely from support in those same two regions. And the American South and West counted because of their population and wealth, not because Texas or Florida possessed their own pension plans or flirted with symbols of imagined but not real power.

Bold health care reforms and slashed business taxes are not the only policies necessary for Alberta and the West to succeed politically. And firewall proponents and the government are right to challenge Ottawa on the gun registry, the Canadian Wheat Board, and the absurd transfers from "have" provinces to "have-not" provinces through equalization and employment insurance. But ultimately, increased Alberta influence and western power will only happen when more money, people and seats are centered right here in the West.


_________________
Honour over deciet, merit over luck, courage over popularity, duty over entitlement...dont let the cliques fool you for they have no honour...only superficial deceit.

ALBERTAN...and DAMN PROUD OF IT!!


pluto
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Age: 60
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,569
Location: Paisley,Scotland UK

18 Jun 2009, 4:46 pm

I also assumed it meant Airdrie in Scotland. Sadly,a similar thing happened in the Uk
recently although I can't remember where.
It's the same type of people who vandalise
children's nurseries,they have no consciense or
respect for anyone.


_________________
I have lost the will to be apathetic


phil777
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 May 2008
Age: 34
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,825
Location: Montreal, Québec

18 Jun 2009, 11:32 pm

Psh? Given to us? Ah! I reckon, you and Ontario have lost more since that crisis ever began! So much for car industry and oil? ^.- Besides, the conservatives in Alberta are as bad as the american republicans (right wing nuts if you need a picture), no wonder George W and Harper were going along so well -.- Why do you think us people in Quebec hate the guy? -.- Now we have a bad reputation for having an idiot prime minister who allied with the most stupid and hated US president ever. And for some odd reasons, some conservatives are afraid that making their government fall will jeopardize the economic measures started by them! Bwhahaha, if only they knew how it works -.- The process wouldn't be aborted so easily anyway. =.= In any event, i'm rather pissed off how Mister Harper acts as if he had a majority when he's "supposed" to have a minority government -.- .

And back on topic, i think i've even heard some monuments back in France were being defiled by people doing sexual acts or shooting naked photos at the site.... >< It coulda been a while, dunno if it's still actual.



dougn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 773

19 Jun 2009, 1:46 am

Tory_canuck wrote:
It is an Alberta Independance flag.It is flown by those in Alberta who wish for more provincial autonomy and to have a firewall to protect Alberta's finances from being taken by the Federal government and given to other provinces such as Quebec.

Then shouldn't it be called the Alberta autonomy flag?

Regardless of its meaning, I cannot say I like it much aesthetically. It is rather busy.

On the other hand I think the current Canadian flag is one of the best designed national flags out there, it is simple, instantly recognizable and attractive.

phil777 wrote:
Psh? Given to us? Ah! I reckon, you and Ontario have lost more since that crisis ever began!

Oh dear, I seem to have started an argument about Canadian politics. ;)

I do think it is interesting that the balance of payments between the federal government and the provinces is a rather large political issue in Canada where it does not seem to be so much in other federations like the US, where there are of course some states that pay more to the federal government than they get back in benefits (like mine - though it is not something I oppose, but then I am a dirty lefty). Admittedly the system by which this happens is rather more convoluted and less transparent than the Canadian one, and perhaps if it is harder for people to grasp it is harder to criticize.

I cannot decide whether the US is more or less centralized than Canada. I guess it is just different.



phil777
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 May 2008
Age: 34
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,825
Location: Montreal, Québec

19 Jun 2009, 11:08 am

Heh, ofc Canada's different o.O we're a confederation.... And we've mostly inherited parts of the British political machine. =/ Hence we don't even have a president. <.<



dougn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 773

19 Jun 2009, 11:30 am

phil777 wrote:
Heh, ofc Canada's different o.O we're a confederation....

I would call Canada a federation, not a confederation, notwithstanding "confederation" as the term for the act of creating the modern (federal) nation-state of Canada (which was intended to be even more centralized at the time).

An actual confederation is much looser. I am not sure there is an example of a confederal nation-state in the world at the moment (even though at least one, the Swiss Confederation, has "confederation" in its name, it is actually a federation de facto).

phil777 wrote:
And we've mostly inherited parts of the British political machine. =/ Hence we don't even have a president. <.<

I have nothing against presidents in general, but I think (from living in it for 21 years) the American system where the president is the head of state and the head of government is actually awful. It somehow manages to simultaneously put too much and not enough power in the hands of one person.

I would rather see a president like e.g. the president of Germany.