Yay! I'm not going to ever live in a nursing home

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ToughDiamond
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19 Jun 2009, 6:02 pm

Hovis wrote:
I believe that they are actually legally unable to place someone in residential care against their will. Unless a doctor declares them to be psychologically unable to make rational decisions and they are sectioned.

Best be careful with those meltdowns, then, folks. Thanks, Hovis - it's reassuring to know we're relatively safe. It must be horrible for an Aspie to lose their autonomy so profoundly.



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19 Jun 2009, 6:11 pm

I worked in a nursing home for a year, that's 364 more days than I wanted to be anywhere near one of those places.



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20 Jun 2009, 3:16 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
Hovis wrote:
I believe that they are actually legally unable to place someone in residential care against their will. Unless a doctor declares them to be psychologically unable to make rational decisions and they are sectioned.

Best be careful with those meltdowns, then, folks. Thanks, Hovis - it's reassuring to know we're relatively safe. It must be horrible for an Aspie to lose their autonomy so profoundly.
acsually it needs one paper and it dont even need your name in there at least thats what it seems like :(


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Hovis
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20 Jun 2009, 5:50 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
Hovis wrote:
I believe that they are actually legally unable to place someone in residential care against their will. Unless a doctor declares them to be psychologically unable to make rational decisions and they are sectioned.

Best be careful with those meltdowns, then, folks. Thanks, Hovis - it's reassuring to know we're relatively safe. It must be horrible for an Aspie to lose their autonomy so profoundly.


I'm not sure if procedures are the same the world over, but certainly here in Britain, there are a lot of safeguards in place now specifically to stop people being packed off to residential homes against their will. I am thinking back on multiple cases that I have seen at work now, and someone really does have to be in quite a bad state mentally before they're assessed as not being able to make decisions for themselves. I cannot imagine a person with an ASD being sectioned unless we truly were a danger to ourselves in our home.



Followthereaper90
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20 Jun 2009, 6:00 am

Hovis wrote:
ToughDiamond wrote:
Hovis wrote:
I believe that they are actually legally unable to place someone in residential care against their will. Unless a doctor declares them to be psychologically unable to make rational decisions and they are sectioned.

Best be careful with those meltdowns, then, folks. Thanks, Hovis - it's reassuring to know we're relatively safe. It must be horrible for an Aspie to lose their autonomy so profoundly.


I'm not sure if procedures are the same the world over, but certainly here in Britain, there are a lot of safeguards in place now specifically to stop people being packed off to residential homes against their will. I am thinking back on multiple cases that I have seen at work now, and someone really does have to be in quite a bad state mentally before they're assessed as not being able to make decisions for themselves. I cannot imagine a person with an ASD being sectioned unless we truly were a danger to ourselves in our home.
yes thats case if u are 18 but if u are like 10 it wont need to depend on u ,i mean i got first placed in grouphome because they told me i was depressed =doing what i love gaming all day long, i still do this and im not depresssed?
i feel like slapping em on law suit ...but then again ill wait until they pay my 1000€ taxses ...never get diesel car :twisted:


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SteveeVader
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20 Jun 2009, 6:39 am

Age1600 wrote:
I have no friends haha, whatsoever, nor i do have the erge to want friends either, so guess im dying young as well haha...


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Psygirl6
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20 Jun 2009, 11:38 am

I do not know why they would put you in a group home for depression, when all you want to do is play video games. here in the United States, normal people play games all day. I have seen things on TV where people have quit their jobs to play video games and they are not depressed. What doctors and people are you seeing. First of all, part of Asperegr's is that you love your interest, so playing video games in not depression at all, it is an interest. That sucks that you have to be in a group home because people's misunderstanding. they say that people with Asperger's have perception problems.I think not, NT's have it just as bad or worse. The fact that you suffered an inappropriate placement all because of that. I would sue, as well. And get tons of money for my interest,lol.



Last edited by Psygirl6 on 20 Jun 2009, 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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20 Jun 2009, 11:47 am

Actually, where the state that i live in here in the States is cutting services like crazy. they actually are trying to get people out of nursing homes and keeping them at home. Even though the people who live in them now do not have to leave if they do not want to, the ones who would be placed in one are now being turned away because they only allow people with the greatest need in them. The even are doing that with group home and disabled agencies, as well. They have levels and depending on the level, that is where they determine eligibility. The person with the greatest need will go into a nursing home,but that is if the person wants to or if the family wants them in. They are now opening agencies where they provide home based and/or community based services instead. My dad has Alzheimer's and he will be getting home based care instead of nursing home because he is still married. Even though he is only early stage, but because it is cheaper and my mom is still around and young, they will get home based services instead. The home based services provide levels from mildly impaired people to hospice care for when the person is dying in bed. That is great, so that the person will never go into a nursing home, even on their death bed.



Last edited by Psygirl6 on 20 Jun 2009, 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

KingdomOfRats
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20 Jun 2009, 1:41 pm

Hovis wrote:
ToughDiamond wrote:
Hovis wrote:
I believe that they are actually legally unable to place someone in residential care against their will. Unless a doctor declares them to be psychologically unable to make rational decisions and they are sectioned.

Best be careful with those meltdowns, then, folks. Thanks, Hovis - it's reassuring to know we're relatively safe. It must be horrible for an Aspie to lose their autonomy so profoundly.


I'm not sure if procedures are the same the world over, but certainly here in Britain, there are a lot of safeguards in place now specifically to stop people being packed off to residential homes against their will. I am thinking back on multiple cases that I have seen at work now, and someone really does have to be in quite a bad state mentally before they're assessed as not being able to make decisions for themselves. I cannot imagine a person with an ASD being sectioned unless we truly were a danger to ourselves in our home.

The staff of the council residential care homes am have lived in,were told by paramedics they can get am sectioned to be physically forced to go hospital and have injuries checked out [injuries through head banging,meltdowns, incidents and tonic clonic seizures] yet have never been at any risk to self or anyone else when they have mentioned sectioning.

There is a user on here called Triangular Trees who was sectioned a few times in the US [for non life threatening to anyone] symptoms of their seizures.
it really seems like an insult in some cases.


--
a lot of adults who need full time support from more than one staff often do not get a choice of living in their own home with the support Vs residential or group home care as sharing care uses less funding for them than providing a big staff team per each one person home instead,so it is like forcing as there is no other choice given.
A lot of us [=adults with autism] are unable to live in community housing,but are very limited in residential care as well because of unsuitability,needs not being met by them and councils not wanting to fund out of borough to widen searches,it took the council a year to find a specialist residential home for am,but was given lifetime placement out of it.

A lot of homes [regular,not support type] in country are not supposed to be adapted well for older peoples needs,and councils will often refuse to adapt homes [preferring to move instead],so where is all this suitable housing to keep older people in normal homes going to come from if more want to live at their home?


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20 Jun 2009, 4:28 pm

I think it's just sad that people should ever have to make statements like, "I'd rather die than live in a nursing home." It says something about just how bad those places can get.

The solution isn't to die early, or die suddenly while still healthy. The solution is to use some of your life, while you're young, working to either close the nursing homes altogether, or give the residents back their rights.

It shouldn't have to be that you'd say, "It's not living if I need help to live." It's not right that people who need help to live are so vulnerable that some don't consider it living at all.

Half the problem with the stigma of disability is the way disabled people, including the disabled elderly, are treated--segregated from the community, stripped of their rights, made into infants again. Change that, give them back their right to control their own lives, and nobody would have to fear being old.


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ToughDiamond
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20 Jun 2009, 6:57 pm

Callista wrote:
It shouldn't have to be that you'd say, "It's not living if I need help to live." It's not right that people who need help to live are so vulnerable that some don't consider it living at all.

Half the problem with the stigma of disability is the way disabled people, including the disabled elderly, are treated--segregated from the community, stripped of their rights, made into infants again. Change that, give them back their right to control their own lives, and nobody would have to fear being old.


I agree it's got a lot to do with the mess that can be made of helping others.

But for me there's another angle to it - that no matter how good the help was, I think I'd still have a very hard time accepting that I needed it. It's strange considering I know that most of what feels like independence is really an illusion - it's a rare person who isn't already dependent on a lot of other people......even for something as simple as tap water. But of course we're mostly in the same boat with that kind of thing, so it's hard to notice.



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20 Jun 2009, 7:31 pm

Yes. I do think that if depending on another person for something most people don't depend on someone else for weren't seen as shameful, this wouldn't be as much of a problem.


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desdemona
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23 Jun 2009, 1:34 am

Woodpecker wrote:
I do not want to end my days in a old folks home packed with NTs rotting away, I think that a old folks home for HFA and AS might be a better place. I do not know if such a place will ever exist.


I'm pretty sure that almost nobody in a really bad state in a nursing home is actually NT anymore.


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