Page 1 of 1 [ 8 posts ] 

Roxas_XIII
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2007
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,217
Location: Laramie, WY

24 Jun 2009, 8:02 pm

Hey everyone. I'm getting ready to apply to a part-time job at the university I'm attending. Its being offered by Disability Support Services, which means at the very least they'll have heard of me. They're looking for a person to scan and edit written material and convert them to alternative formats for disabled students (i.e. MP3 audio file for someone who is blind). They want someone who is skilled at computers, especially MS Word and digital scanning hardware/software, who can work easily with special needs students, and who can be trusted to maintain confidentiality. Thankfully, I have volunteer work backgrounds and references that prove all of these requirements (I mentored once for a summer program for special needs kids, I was the IT go-to guy and the only one who knew how to work the scanner for the school newspaper, and I have several former neighbors who trusted their homes to me on a regular basis when I was dog-sitting for them while on vacation. That meets all three: good with special needs people, computer & tech-savvy, and trustworthy)

Anyways, I've compiled all this info into a basic resume format, but I still don't think I've quite got it. Do any of you have any tips on making a good resume, especially when it comes to formatting (fonts, paragraph arrangement, alignment, etc.)? I'm quite sure that I'll be hired, but this will be my first major job, so I don't want to take any chances.

Domo Arigato!

Roxas


_________________
"Yeah, so this one time, I tried playing poker with tarot cards... got a full house, and about four people died." ~ Unknown comedian

Happy New Year from WP's resident fortune-teller! May the cards be ever in your favor.


Peko
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,381
Location: Eastern PA, USA

24 Jun 2009, 9:41 pm

No idea honestly (never had a job myself/besides working at my mom's ex-business).

You could ask your parents or just google "resume formats"


Mister Roboto Domo...Domo

(I don't know if I spelled any of that right)...:oops: :roll:


_________________
Balance is needed within the universe, can be demonstrated in most/all concepts/things. Black/White, Good/Evil, etc.
All dependent upon your own perspective in your own form of existence, so trust your own gut and live the way YOU want/need to.


pschristmas
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Apr 2008
Age: 54
Gender: Female
Posts: 959
Location: Buda, TX

24 Jun 2009, 11:14 pm

Does the Career Services department at your university offer resume services? They may be able to help.

Regards,

Patricia



Roxas_XIII
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2007
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,217
Location: Laramie, WY

24 Jun 2009, 11:19 pm

I might chck with them. I also know that Student Sucess Services (an organization at UW that is open to low-income, first-generation, special needs, and/or other disadvantaged students) helps with job searching and resumes.

Really, its not the content of the resume that needs help, its the format. Also, can anyone tell me what the hell is a cover letter? The application says email resume and cover letter to X, but I don't even know what it is.


_________________
"Yeah, so this one time, I tried playing poker with tarot cards... got a full house, and about four people died." ~ Unknown comedian

Happy New Year from WP's resident fortune-teller! May the cards be ever in your favor.


pschristmas
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Apr 2008
Age: 54
Gender: Female
Posts: 959
Location: Buda, TX

24 Jun 2009, 11:38 pm

I know what it is, but I've never been able to write an effective one. It's one of those horrible things where you're supposed to "sell youself" to a potential employer -- in other words, tell them in no more than one type-written page why you and only you are the absolute best candidate for the position.

Regards,

Patricia



Asterisp
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Dec 2007
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 898
Location: Netherlands

25 Jun 2009, 12:40 am

I made several resumes and it got me enough interviews, unfortunately the interviews were the difficult part.

But back to the resume. Some employers expect a short resume of your (common) motivations and personality, not all. On formatting issues, I choose a paper (90-100 grams) that is a bit thicker or heavier than normal paper. The font is a normal looking, but not the standard font (I used Trebuchet a lot). That way it looks neat, even when folded and it stands out (but not too much).

When you have written the resume, put it apart, sleep one night and look at it again. Then give it to some one else to review it.

The advice voor Career Services is a good thing.



pakled
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Nov 2007
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,015

26 Jun 2009, 4:41 pm

I just got laid off, and went to some 'how you get jobs nowadays' courses. I don't know if we're allowed to advertise web sites, but google 'make your resume talk'

It's a really local site, but it explains in detail what you have to do to stand out. I've been reading and rewriting for over a week on mine.

Quick tips

Pick up a piece of paper, and hold it with your thumb and finger. Anything above your thumb is what will be read by someone in HR. If you're not interesting them by the time you reach their thumb, they'll toss it.

Resumes are now advertisements for yourself. The way your parents did it (heck, even older brothers and sisters) doesn't work. at all. Every job posted (according to statistics) has 5,000 response.

First, if you apply online, your resume will go through a sorting program. It measures how many works in common with the ad are in your resume. The more matches, the more likely you'll get saved. (NOTE - you have to use them intelligently. Just copying the ad, or listing the words, won't get you an interview)

Most HR people look at your resume for 30 seconds at most. Then it goes in the square box or the circular file. Your top portion has to be interesting.
What's been suggested lately is the following

Name -top line, or the sorting machines will kick it out, and it doesn't get seen

No lines across - also kicked out by sorting machines

bullets - don't use with online resumes, it will also get kicked out

If delivered or mailed, make sure the 1-page resume is balanced, and looks good. 12-point for most of the details, and a font that's easy to read.

now- the most important part. You have to write a different resume for every job you apply for.

Under name, put Objective - a 3 line (max) description that starts with the job name, includes their company name, and what good stuff you can do for them.

Then, it's more customization; if you're still in high school or college, education will probably be next, work experience (list in order of relevance, not chronologically. Phrase these according to how similar what you did is to what you're applying for. It's not about what you can do, but how you did it better.

Skip the 'references provided upon request', if you run out of room. It's a given.


There's bunches more. See if you can find the web site.

I find it utter agony to write like this for a resume, but that's what's being asked for by HR around the nation. Hope this starts you on the way.



makuranososhi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 May 2008
Age: 44
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,805
Location: Banned by Alex

26 Jun 2009, 4:59 pm

Be succinct in your wording. Use action words and limited, targeted adjectives. Include your work history, education, and skills - the first two being likely in chronological order unless your experience is so varied or extensive as to require a different grouping. Many include an objective statement about why one should be hired, or who you are as an applicant... I find these obtuse and irksome, and have found that putting my skills in bullets there (2-3 columns) is equally if not more effective. Find ways to stand out somehow - if you're not hired now, you want to be the first person they think of when another opportunity comes up - but remain professional.


M.


_________________
My thanks to all the wonderful members here; I will miss the opportunity to continue to learn and work with you.

For those who seek an alternative, it is coming.

So long, and thanks for all the fish!