Finally-- really cool videos on helping autistic kids!!

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desdemona
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03 Jul 2009, 4:09 pm

These are some very cool videos on service dogs for autistic kids. There is no talk of cure.
One or two are a bit sickly sweet, but I love the one about the kid who trains his service dog to do agility:
http://www.northstardogs.com/videos.shtml

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03 Jul 2009, 4:22 pm

I remember watching this video in 2006 before I was diagnosed. I found that I could relate to the kid with Autism and I was worried my family would point it out. I don't know why but I thought everyone else was thinking the same thing. I can see why this dog therapy would help. My dog will actually make effort to comfort me when I'm upset, esp. if I'm angry.


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03 Jul 2009, 4:26 pm

My cat believes he's a dog...



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03 Jul 2009, 4:33 pm

Ebonwinter wrote:
My cat believes he's a dog...


lol completely off-topic but it's funny because my cat acts like a dog.


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Callista
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03 Jul 2009, 4:33 pm

Dogs = cool. And service dogs are REALLY cool... I see them in action at school sometimes; a couple of the other students have them. There's this really pretty golden retriever...

Anyway, I think I should mention something re. service dogs. Many autistic people would benefit from a dog but don't actually need a full-fledged service dog. A service dog can be trained to do things like pull you back if you are about to walk into traffic (visual processing can do that; so can a tendency to run when you are stressed/angry/afraid), sit on you or lean against you if you are in overload (pressure helps many people), get help if you are hurt and can't call for it yourself, etc. On the other hand, you may simply need an "emotional support" dog--that is, a well-trained dog that functions as a pet or a companion, for safe social interaction and the well-known stress-relieving effect of interacting with animals. It has to be every bit as well behaved as a service dog to be allowed into public places like malls and restaurants--willing to sit still for long periods of time, not bark, not run to chase something or greet somebody, and unfailingly obey commands. In many places, an emotional support animal can get privileges most animals don't get, such as permission to live with you in an apartment that does not usually allow pets, or go into areas that don't usually allow pets. But, once again, it has to be very well behaved to do those things--the same standards as a service dog, even though it might not have the specialized training.


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03 Jul 2009, 4:41 pm

Callista wrote:
Dogs = cool. And service dogs are REALLY cool... I see them in action at school sometimes; a couple of the other students have them. There's this really pretty golden retriever...

Anyway, I think I should mention something re. service dogs. Many autistic people would benefit from a dog but don't actually need a full-fledged service dog. A service dog can be trained to do things like pull you back if you are about to walk into traffic (visual processing can do that; so can a tendency to run when you are stressed/angry/afraid), sit on you or lean against you if you are in overload (pressure helps many people), get help if you are hurt and can't call for it yourself, etc. On the other hand, you may simply need an "emotional support" dog--that is, a well-trained dog that functions as a pet or a companion, for safe social interaction and the well-known stress-relieving effect of interacting with animals. It has to be every bit as well behaved as a service dog to be allowed into public places like malls and restaurants--willing to sit still for long periods of time, not bark, not run to chase something or greet somebody, and unfailingly obey commands. In many places, an emotional support animal can get privileges most animals don't get, such as permission to live with you in an apartment that does not usually allow pets, or go into areas that don't usually allow pets. But, once again, it has to be very well behaved to do those things--the same standards as a service dog, even though it might not have the specialized training.


That's the problem with my dog. She gets nervous and paces plus she barks at people. She starts to shake when she is around new people. She reminds me of myself.

It's too bad that the service dogs are so expensive plus it only seems to be for Autistic children.


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desdemona
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03 Jul 2009, 5:36 pm

I love the kid who does agility with the dog.
I know a person who trained his dog to be an emotional support dog (I think that's the level of training he has).
He was not a perfectly trained dog, more supportive in confusing situations that kind of thing. He was trained to lean which was quite a nice thing. Too bad I can't train my Corgi to do taht, but they are a bit small. However, there are quite a few Corgi service dogs. They are usually trained as hearing dogs, I think. Even heard of papillons which is a toy breed.



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04 Jul 2009, 8:07 am

x_amount_of_words,
there are American adult users on wp with service dogs [for their ASD],they got them as adults,if have been looking for them-have found every charity/organisation that offers it?

the UK is rubbish with service dogs and only offers them to autie children currently.
It could help a lot of ASD adults who live on their own.


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desdemona
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04 Jul 2009, 2:52 pm

KingdomOfRats wrote:
x_amount_of_words,
there are American adult users on wp with service dogs [for their ASD],they got them as adults,if have been looking for them-have found every charity/organisation that offers it?

the UK is rubbish with service dogs and only offers them to autie children currently.
It could help a lot of ASD adults who live on their own.
ut

Hmm, the children's groups are more powerful politically. You might approach them with accts from the US of dog's working with adults. (OTOH, the only thing I can think of is http://www.pscydog.com) This is all psychiatric service dogs-- yes, yes, it isn't psychiatric. But its the only one I have heard of . They have a nice little list, which doesn't include autism, but specific behaviors that a dog can help with. Some of them do apply to autism.


Many people here train such a dog themselves (perhaps with the help of a professional trainer).
You list your problems and then what the dog could do to work with you.
Thing is there is something but I have no idea what I could train my dog to do about it. That is I don't have melt downs any more in my great age :) But if I get overstilmmed my brain kind of stays that way for hours and hours. It's tricky, as I don't think there are any behaviors for it.

I don't know if that helps any, but I hope so.

Anyway, back to the videos. There is one I didn't look at when I posted that. Its called Patty's Principles. I love some of them. "Sometimes autistic children should be allowed to be in their own world."
"Don't sacrifice their childhood to early intervention". Yikes that's downright radical to the folks of "Autism Speaks".



--des