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zemiller
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09 Nov 2011, 5:29 am

Great tips. Thanks for sharing. I would like to add - Check for accreditation of the college



writingresearcher
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29 May 2012, 9:07 pm

I recommend seeking out the campus Writing Center... they are often a great resource for helping whenever you have to start writing for a class.



J-P
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23 Apr 2013, 8:49 pm

sg33 wrote:
themikenesedude wrote:
So I'm wondering what to do about making sure I can get the education that is my right to have.


* Make sure all other areas of your life are well-supported and stable before starting this venture: finances, housing, interpersonal relationships, physical and mental health, health care access, etc.
* Get an advocate on your local disability rights activism group to help you plan a reintegration strategy.
* Gain at least one ally on your school's staff, preferably one with disability competency.
* Contact your local AS support and service organization and ask them for personal references for educational assistants, as well as asking for names of anyone on the school staff or faculty who is well-versed in AS issues.
* Get appropriate AS-related accommodations for classwork, homework, small group work, testing, and social support. Hold meetings with your advocate, yourself, and your professors to explain your situation and your needs.
* Start slow. Don't jump into a full workload. Start with just one easy class, get used to going to the campus, showing up on time, meeting people, etc.
* Keep in close contact with your academic advisor, tutor, and disability advocate. Make sure that you are fulfilling your responsibilities for your current classes. Determine what your degree path will be in order to select the classes that will lead to that degree.
* If you're planning to go to a university, considers starting out at a community college where if you screw up it won't be a blot on your transcript or mess up your GPA (you're not required to disclose that information or transfer those credits, you may not even be able to transfer them)
* Get help learning about the campus student life: clubs, organizations, activities, sports, etc. Get help from the disability advocacy group on campus with social integration.
* Don't rant and complain to people who are on your side. Don't alienate people, especially those who can help or hurt you. Get yourself into therapy, even if you think you don't need it, so you'll have an appropriate place to vent your frustration. Create a plan for dealing with the increased stress BEFORE you even start. Practice your stress-management skills well in advance.
* If the plans get messed up, don't give up. Regroup and try again.


Good list but never i come back to shccol as it's overated and if need an diploma i prefer pay mafia to get an false one



Melangey
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08 Feb 2015, 11:03 pm

I'm addicted to learning, so I'm returning to school to pursue psychology. It's been 5 years since I graduated with a BA the first time from a university. It was very hard because I was undiagnosed. But I had some insider tips and I'm VERY over - compulsive.

If you have time, NOT a necessity, but finding a professor first can take a lot of anxiety out of the first day. You can also see who NOT to take. Has worked for me every time. All of my professors were VERY understanding whenever I told them I was having issues.

www.ratemyprofessor.com

Also, I acted as a tutor in English, because I'm a "savant" in some areas, which can make some classes easier and some impossible. USE. YOUR. FREE. TUTORS. And if one tutor sucks, rotate to another.

Plan ahead. It's essential. But also plan relaxing time. I used to write "Star Trek Saturdays" in big purple font and force myself not to look at schoolwork all Saturday. Instead, I learned from Professors Picard, LaForge, and Data. Made "Study Sundays," more fun.

We can DO IT!



taiwanluthiers
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18 Feb 2015, 3:03 am

sg33 wrote:
themikenesedude wrote:
So I'm wondering what to do about making sure I can get the education that is my right to have.


* Make sure all other areas of your life are well-supported and stable before starting this venture: finances, housing, interpersonal relationships, physical and mental health, health care access, etc.
* Get an advocate on your local disability rights activism group to help you plan a reintegration strategy.
* Gain at least one ally on your school's staff, preferably one with disability competency.
* Contact your local AS support and service organization and ask them for personal references for educational assistants, as well as asking for names of anyone on the school staff or faculty who is well-versed in AS issues.
* Get appropriate AS-related accommodations for classwork, homework, small group work, testing, and social support. Hold meetings with your advocate, yourself, and your professors to explain your situation and your needs.
* Start slow. Don't jump into a full workload. Start with just one easy class, get used to going to the campus, showing up on time, meeting people, etc.
* Keep in close contact with your academic advisor, tutor, and disability advocate. Make sure that you are fulfilling your responsibilities for your current classes. Determine what your degree path will be in order to select the classes that will lead to that degree.
* If you're planning to go to a university, considers starting out at a community college where if you screw up it won't be a blot on your transcript or mess up your GPA (you're not required to disclose that information or transfer those credits, you may not even be able to transfer them)
* Get help learning about the campus student life: clubs, organizations, activities, sports, etc. Get help from the disability advocacy group on campus with social integration.
* Don't rant and complain to people who are on your side. Don't alienate people, especially those who can help or hurt you. Get yourself into therapy, even if you think you don't need it, so you'll have an appropriate place to vent your frustration. Create a plan for dealing with the increased stress BEFORE you even start. Practice your stress-management skills well in advance.
* If the plans get messed up, don't give up. Regroup and try again.


Remember if you are going to get financial aid, they require you undertake a minimum amount of hours per semester in order to get funding. If you think you can only do 6 hours because you have a full time job, then try to get your employer to help. Otherwise DO NOT get a full time job while you study, you will fail. (this is aside from the fact that you won't get financial aid if you only do 6 hours at a time)

I'm actually going back to University of Texas to study Geology.



Joehotto101
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02 Jul 2015, 3:28 pm

* Start slow. Don't jump into a full workload. Start with just one easy class, get used to going to the campus, showing up on time, meeting people, etc.
[/quote]

What if you want an intellectual challenge, but aren't an excellent student?



Rudin
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20 Jul 2015, 8:14 pm

I like school however I don't want to back due to a certain event that occurred at the end of the school year. By checklist I actually thought you meant back to school supplies.

- Be more organized, at the end of the year my desk was a f*****g mess! My parent's are considering a IEP or IPP (Individualized Education Program) to help me.

- Avoid being bullied. I had know idea I was being bullied but my teacher told my father two pricks were bullying me "mercilessly" all year long.

- Become more social.

- Fight my OCD

-Find a place where I can relax and feel comfortable. Like a corner store or restaurant where I can get a break from the rest of the world and maybe make a purchase or eat something on my own. This will help me relax a little.

I have lots on my supply list.


_________________
"God may not play dice with the universe, but something strange is going on with prime numbers."

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"There are two types of cryptography in this world: cryptography that will stop your kid sister from looking at your files, and cryptography that will stop major governments from reading your files."

-Bruce Schneider


SandraH155
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27 Jun 2017, 5:56 am

Don't dive too much into studies. Make it simple, not stressful. If you have big and complicated tasks you'd better ask for help your friends, MOD EDIT: LINK EDITED OUT. It would be better than spend all your free time trying to find necessary information and not sleeping enough.



Floratro
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25 Jul 2017, 10:58 am

I would recommend the following things:
- Try to establish healthy habits like meditating, exercising, etc.
- Always study in the same place and use that place only for studying.
- Don’t do group projects all by yourself (if other people won’t cooperate, tell the teacher/professor). Instead, let other people contribute as well and try to correct everything of which you are certain that it’s incorrect. If you aren’t sure of this, speak to your group members about the thing you think is incorrect.
- Remember that hard work does indeed pay off. Do your best, even if it feels like it won’t matter in the end – you never know what might happen.
- Never, under any circumstances, pull an all-nighter. It is just not worth it; you’ll feel very tired and won’t be able to do anything productive.
- Do not completely depend on teachers/professors. Sadly, not all of them do their job very well. In that case you’ll just have to do more work.
- Try to use the Pomodoro technique, and try to switching between tasks every hour or so to stay motivated.



lylamorris
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11 Oct 2018, 1:24 am

Hi, I'm new here, you guys are really having a great conversation in this "Going Back To School Checklist" thread. this is the valid kind of topic to talk. when you are in school or college that time you have a so much good experience as well as bad experiences enjoys the good one and learn from the bad once. 8)



sidetrack
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23 Oct 2018, 3:57 pm

If ever 'go back to school'..

I have had a twisted and complicated relationship with school/the 'labour investment process centres' and would like to candidly say how it failed me.

Aside from factoring the shame of the cost and what lifestyle adjustments I would have to make to whatever 'further adult' life, I wind up having, I would like to say how I would to do a program like

https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/ce/program ... dation-041

in spite of the possible ridicule it could receive labour economics/labour market impact. No longer would I like to feel under pressure, *false* pressure that it is obligatory for me to through through a labour investment process learning things I don't like too much or am too interested in while risking continous triggerings of when going through such a process was obligatory and left me with scars from socialization which most ppl would never really care to hear about or understand for that matter..



StevenJacob098
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16 Jan 2019, 7:13 am

it also make me enthusist for my old school days. When i set behind my best friend who was the topper of my class.