Anything that made elementary school easier for you?

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jonahsmom
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03 Sep 2009, 8:08 am

I posted at the parents' board as well, but I prefer to get answers from those who have actually been there when possible.

I read so much from adults with autism about terrible memories of being bullied, feeling different, being overwhelmed, etc. in school. My son is about to start kindergarten and I would like to hear about anything that made school easier for you. Or if there was nothing easy or good about it, is there anything that you now think could have made it easier back then?

Any response is OK...even if your answer it only could have been easier if you never went at all. :) I am a person who likes to hear the real truth, not the altered version that will make me feel better.

Thanks!



gramirez
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03 Sep 2009, 8:34 am

Socially, no. Academically, an AlphaSmart saved my ass big time. It's a little portable word processor. Since my handwriting was very poor, and I was very slow at writing, this was a TREMENDOUS help.


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serenity
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03 Sep 2009, 9:12 am

I started a thread a couple wks ago about this subject. I'm planning on editing it into a list to where I can print it for my sons' teachers. I also have replies from another forum, and facebook that I need to incorporate into the list. It's a lot more editing than I thought it was going to be! You can view the thread here: http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt105353.html

I hope that your son does well in kindergarten. Good luck!



jonahsmom
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03 Sep 2009, 9:46 am

gramirez- Thanks for this idea. We have a grant that allows us to buy adaptive equipment for our son, so it's good to know that such a tool is out there.

serenity-I didn't look at the thread yet but I am sure it will be very helpful. What a great idea to give the list to teachers! I have an awesome book called "Martian in the Playground" (or something akin to that) that is written by a woman with Asperger's about her school experience. I have often wished I could make a teacher read it, but I know realistically they probably aren't going to bring a novel home and read it in their spare time. Your list idea might be what makes this type of thing doable.



Jaydog1212
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03 Sep 2009, 10:33 am

Socially: I was labeled all kinds of things because I didn't know know how to play sports (even throw a football etc.). My father wasn't a part of my life during my formative years. I think a big way boys socialize is simply through physical activity. I think it's less about what they say and more about what they can do. If things were different I wish I had someone show me some BASIC physical skills to better interact with my peers. I ended up isolating myself on the playground and eventually hanging out with girls. Then all of the boys in the class would call me "weird"...then a couple of grades later "weird" changed to "gay" :roll:

Academically: I think my mom needed more feedback regarding my academic performance. I would contact your teacher and build a rapport with him/her. Hopefully, your teacher will tell you if your son slips in certain areas. Then you could do some correctives measures (tutors, modifications etc.). I remember being humiliated by my teacher during long-division lessons. For some reason, I totally didn't understand long-division and would get stuck. The teacher would tell me to solve the problem in front of the class. The teacher would let me roast and wait for me to solve the problem. All of the students, would say "come-on....hurry up!". It was embarrassing....I didn't need social pressure, I needed extra practice. Rather than let this continue DAILY, the teacher would have helped me better if he would have contact my mom to tell her I needed extra help with long-division (perhaps with a tutor).



Dilbert
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03 Sep 2009, 11:25 am

Elemetary school was fine for me. High school was fine.

Junior high was hell.

Academically, it helped sitting next to and making friends with a good student.

Socially, it was pretty hopeless. JH kids are a pack of wolves.



dustintorch
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03 Sep 2009, 11:43 am

My school life was very unusual. I was bullied a lot in school. However, I changed schools 14 times by the time I graduated high school. The change was hard but it got easier every time. I think it may have actually helped me develop my social skills to meet new people. I never really got over the anxiety of meeting new people, but I was always happy to leave whatever bully I had at the time behind.



jonahsmom
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03 Sep 2009, 11:49 am

blue jay- Thanks for sharing that info. Sorry about what you went through socially. I can see that coming for my son. He hates sports and large group games. And he's much more comfortable with girls...he has a little sister who is just 14 months younger who also is on the spectrum and they play together all day long quite nicely. It's other kids he can't figure out.

I heard ten year old girls bullying a boy about being gay the other day. They pointed out that he always hung out with girls and didn't have guy friends. I wanted to step in, but it's such an odd situation. You don't know if an adult stepping in will just make it worse.

dilbert- If it helps, I think junior high is pretty much hell for everyone. Those are also some of my very worst memories.