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DarrylZero
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06 Sep 2009, 3:00 pm

mgran wrote:
Did you know that some very clever teens have their mobile phones ring on frequencies that most adults can't hear? Oh, for an aspie teacher to confiscate the bloody thing!


Yes. A few years ago I had a co-worker who was in her early twenties and she started talking about the "mosquito" ring tones that supposedly only people under 25 years of age could hear. She went on the Internet and found a site with a sound sample. Well, at 31-32 years of age I could hear it very clearly and immediately asked her to shut it off because it was painful to listen to.

I later found out it was originally developed for businesses who didn't want kids loitering around their premises. The idea was to play the sound over loudspeakers outside the building. Adult customers wouldn't be affected but it would drive kids away. I guess they didn't plan on those same kids using it as ring tones in their phones to evade detection by teachers.



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06 Sep 2009, 10:26 pm

[quote="ColdBlooded"]their words seem to all flow together and i can only pick out a few. I can hear very well that there is sound coming out of their mouth, but it turns into a meaningless flow of speech-noise i can't understand. There are a few people i work with, even a couple managers, who i just kind of nod along and say "uhhh huhhh..." quote]

I know exactly what you mean. My co-workers are constantly telling me I am losing my hearing even though I have had my hearing tested and it is well above normal. I can often hear sounds others can't. However, when conversation is involved, I get easily lost. My co-workers have been trained to wait until I am looking at them to start a conversation. They say my name, but won't continue until I look at them because I have explained that I can only follow what they are saying if I can lip-read as well.


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06 Sep 2009, 10:32 pm

Arcadian wrote:
I carry ear-plugs everywhere, at all times, because it's uncomfortable to deal with anything above normal volume


I can usually deal with loud sounds, it is the quieter, repetitive sounds that drive me insane. I have to wear earplugs at night to drown out the clock, or others in my house breathing too loudly, or the sound of my cats walking around. Without the earplugs I wouldn't sleep.


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KJC
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07 Sep 2009, 2:18 am

I have great hearing. For example, when young I would track an ice cream truck from blocks away. The thing is that sort of like zooming in on a map, I first hear many things and then zero in on a particular type of sound, tone, or voice. I also have one of the best memories in my family that can even go back to some points of infancy. Is that memory bit another AS trait?



mgran
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07 Sep 2009, 2:50 am

It may be. I remember being a baby very clearly, and can describe things that I saw in very early infancy. My son remembers things that occured to him in his first year... I think his earliest definite memory is at about six months.

My Dad remembers being six months old as well though, and though he shouldn't really be considered neurotypical (he is a genuine polymath genius) he is in other regards NT. At least, he's not aspie.



Sati
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07 Sep 2009, 3:40 am

My hearing is VERY hypersensitive. So it's good in a bad way!



persian85033
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07 Sep 2009, 6:33 pm

mgran wrote:
I am thirty eight, and I can still hear bats. Most people can't hear them past their teens.

My brother is a science teacher, and when he does "sound", he plays sound waves that adults can't hear to annoy his kids. He never believed my ears, until I walked into his classroom one time, and covered them, saying, "what is that squealing... what are you doing, killing rats?"

Did you know that some very clever teens have their mobile phones ring on frequencies that most adults can't hear? Oh, for an aspie teacher to confiscate the bloody thing!


Cool. Now I know how both Terry and Bruce spend time in the BatCave wthout getting so annoyed.lolThe butler, too. I'd go insane.

I can hear quite a few many things other people can't for some reason. It's good for eavesdropping, and eavesdroppers often hear highly entertaining and amusing things.

I can also hear things like when peoples' stomachs growl. :?



Lachlan
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07 Sep 2009, 7:19 pm

I just listened to the mosquito ringtone described above on YouTube, and I couldn't hear it, but I still got a headache after listening to it.



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07 Sep 2009, 7:57 pm

Yes for high frequency but when it comes to watching tv or understanding what people said its alot harder to understand. Its like you hear something and think someone is speaking to you but its just you are hearing things other people cant.


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KJC
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08 Sep 2009, 4:42 am

I can hear the mosquito tone. I trained my senses on the pitch and can now hear it on most of my computer's volume levels. Its like faint audio feedback or how I can hear a TV that's on when its paused.



michel
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08 Sep 2009, 4:52 am

Yes, I have great ears. 8)



ozzie_girl
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08 Sep 2009, 7:03 am

I've had many hearing tests over the years because I've always had trouble hearing in certain situations (speech on TV, at parties/restaurants, etc) and the tests were normal except for some minor loss at high frequency (noise-related hearing loss) - I even turn the TV subtitles on during movies sometimes but I'm told Aspergers explains this. What is surprising is that I just tried the mosquito ring tone and I can hear it! (I'm 30). So, my hearing isn't that bad at all!



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08 Sep 2009, 8:08 am

I have good ears... but only for certain things. I'll have to ask people over and over what they said, because it's not processing or I'm just not hearing them clearly for some reason. Yet, for instance, this past weekend we were all sitting outside and I was the only one who could hear this high pitched whining noise going constantly in the background.

Kind of surprising, because I also get chronic ear infections... at one point the doc said I'd be lucky to have half of my hearing left by the time I'm 40. Yet, I can still hear those noises no one else can, but can't hear someone talking right in front of me.


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08 Sep 2009, 8:22 am

I have excellent hearing, and I'm not happy about it. Since my brain "hears" all sounds as equally important, being able to hear lots of sounds leads to overload even more quickly than it would otherwise.



persian85033
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08 Sep 2009, 1:24 pm

ozzie_girl wrote:
I even turn the TV subtitles on during movies sometimes but I'm told Aspergers explains this.


Really? I have a hard time watching tv without subtitles. I mean it's not that I can't hear it's just much more easier to understand when you read the subtitles.