I hate dealing with people who speak poor English

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sartresue
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25 Oct 2009, 9:27 am

Lingua obscura topic

As long as people speak slowly and clearly, without mumbling, I can hear them. But I would much rather read them. lol lulz plz meh lolwut n00b ftw wtf afaIk IMO (ST*U--this one is too nasty)


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Keith
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25 Oct 2009, 9:31 am

I have no problem understanding accents. It's when poor pronunciation that gets me when the words "could've" and "should've" are written as "could of" and "should of" or the "I wanted to get off of" you can't have the two in a sentence like that together.

I can mimick accents very well. Australian, Irish, Welsh, Scottish. People think I am Australian or African, but they still ask, "Where are you from?" I answer then, I get "no, you're not" Whaddafuk?
I do love the "You are so well spoken" - SMUG :D



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25 Oct 2009, 10:25 am

Spazzergasm wrote:
Blindspot149 wrote:

Actually it was more annoying for me because I KNEW she couldn't possibly be speaking English...........otherwise I would be able to understand it.........right?

I think if I was NT I would certainly have stopped insisting she was speaking English after the first denial........

If I had been an NT with very good social graces, I probably would (discretely) have asked the Singaporeans who were with me to 'translate'


one could assume! really she should be the one to try and alter her speech in such a case. XD

oh, i thought you meant SHE was insistign she was speaking english.

why didnt you? lack of occur? :P



She was insisting she was speaking English and she actually was! I was also insisting that she couldn't possibly be speaking English.

I have this problem with the Singaporean accent, whoever is speaking to me and whatever the country. I just can't follow it.


I think she probably thought I was Autistic...............oh, wait a minute...............I............... :wink:


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Spazzergasm
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25 Oct 2009, 10:52 am

Blindspot149 wrote:

She was insisting she was speaking English and she actually was! I was also insisting that she couldn't possibly be speaking English.

I have this problem with the Singaporean accent, whoever is speaking to me and whatever the country. I just can't follow it.


I think she probably thought I was Autistic...............oh, wait a minute...............I............... :wink:


oh, ok.

poor singaporeans- sounds like they have it bad. XD. no one can understand them! at least you and i cant :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



Blindspot149
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25 Oct 2009, 12:51 pm

Spazzergasm wrote:
Blindspot149 wrote:

She was insisting she was speaking English and she actually was! I was also insisting that she couldn't possibly be speaking English.

I have this problem with the Singaporean accent, whoever is speaking to me and whatever the country. I just can't follow it.


I think she probably thought I was Autistic...............oh, wait a minute...............I............... :wink:


oh, ok.

poor singaporeans- sounds like they have it bad. XD. no one can understand them! at least you and i cant :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:




Now that I think of it...........Singaporeans...........


VERY focussed, formal language but unusual use of language and intonation...........I wonder if.......................nah.............


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Spazzergasm
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25 Oct 2009, 1:16 pm

i doubt all singaporeans are aspious. although my prior singaporean maths teacher might correlate...



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25 Oct 2009, 5:32 pm

I have a very hard time with strong accents. I had to get a different psychiatrist because the South Asian guy I had has hard to understand.


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25 Oct 2009, 7:40 pm

Spokane_Girl wrote:
I have difficulty understanding what they are saying and their cues are hard to read. But when I see normal people talking to them who don't speak their primiary language, they don't seem to have difficulty in understanding them. I wonder how they do it?

Anyone else have this same problem? Do normal people have this issue too and some are just good at understanding a word they're saying?



This isn't as much of a problem for me as it used to me, because I've had more experience with accents. The lady who cuts my hair is a native Vietnamese speaker, and I had trouble understanding anything she said until I figured out that she's leaving the "s" out of words in certain cases. I don't speak a word of Vietnamese, but I assume their language doesn't put the "s" sound it the same places we do, and therefore it's unnatural and difficult for her. I can't make a French "r" sound to save my life, so I guess it evens out.

I remember working at a pizza restaurant years ago, and becoming very nervous when an English guy came into the restaurant and placed an order. He certainly wasn't speaking "poor English", but it was an accent that I hadn't been exposed to before. I couldn't tell you what part of England he was from (at that point I didn't know there were more than two English accents), just that he didn't sound like one of the Monty Python guys, which, at that point, was all the "English" I knew.

The part that makes me cringe when I remember it, is that I think a more NT person, or a person without my social anxiety, would have said, "Oh, cool. You aren't from around here are you? I'm sorry, but could you say that again, please? I'm just not accustomed to your accent," and that would have been fine. I couldn't begin to say something like that. I could only tremble and stammer, and feel like the world was crashing in on me, and be terrified that he'd say something and I would freeze up.



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26 Oct 2009, 1:18 am

I skimmed the thread and did not see that someone mentioned this... but like I said, I skimmed it.
If people on the spectrum, on average, have a harder time understanding what people with thick accents or who speak English (or whatever their language may be) poorly it may be because it is harder for us, people on the spectrum, to read body language that NTs pick up on. While some body language is cultural much is the same throughout the world.

I find that I actually have a fairly easy time understanding what people with poor Englsih are saying once I get used to which sounds they use in place of the correct sounds. It usually takes talking to them once for me to figure it out.



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26 Oct 2009, 3:28 am

FOr me, it depends on the accent.

Spanish and French, I can understand, because I can speak those languages. Other languages, I have trouble understanding.


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16 Apr 2018, 9:22 am

I find I have that problem alot since coming to the south. Many people either need to get hooked on phonics or an English to English translation up in here. And the thing about it is that I don't like to be rude, but if I can't understand what's coming out of your mouth then I'm automatically annoyed. Not even in the "lesser educated" areas of NY did I have problems understanding what people were saying. But I guess being native(NYer) that anything within that surrounding area sounds normal to me no matter what o-o



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16 Apr 2018, 11:35 am

I find it mostly to be a problem over the phone where I cannot see the person...so then I can't see any other hints as to what they are saying.

If I can see the person its certainly easier to understand them even if they don't speak good english.


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16 Apr 2018, 3:21 pm

Oh look, great to see one of my threads being brought back from the dead. :D

It always amazes me to see how people can understand people with thick accents fine. So it makes me think this must be a problem I have and this isn't normal.


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19 Apr 2018, 5:13 am

I often have to ask people with strong accents or poor language skills to repeat themselves even if I can tell we're both speaking Finnish. As for English... well, it's not really a problem since I don't usually hear it anywhere else than the TV and no one's gonna complain if I don't get what's being said. :P



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19 Apr 2018, 9:03 am

I hate accents in movies because they are so obviously fake and don't represent the speech patterns of any regular person from the country portrayed. I don't mind real accents. I don't like when people use too much verbal filler words (um, uh, like, anyway).