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BelindatheNobody
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07 Nov 2009, 6:47 pm

Most of the books by Stephen King
(To name some: The Dark Tower series, Duma Key, The Stand, Cell, some of the short stories from Everything's Eventual)
And Dean Koontz.
(Some: From the Corner of His Eye, By the Light of the Moon, The Face, Odd Thomas, Brother Odd, Forever Odd).
The Lionboy trilogy by "Zizou Corder".
The Harry Potter books.
Some of the Dark-Hunter books.





iquanyin wrote:
the man who mistook his wife for a hat -- ?

Oliver Sacks?


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07 Nov 2009, 7:21 pm

Some of my favourites (in no particular order):

*Blindness - Jose Saramago
*The Lord of the Rings (I count them even though I haven't fully finished them yet)
*The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy trilogy in five parts (six parts now if you count the new one, I haven't read it yet though)
*The Red Dwarf books
*1984 - George Orwell
*Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
*The World Without Us - Alan Weisman
*I Am Legend - Richard Matheson
*The Exorcist - William Peter Blatty
*House of Leaves - Mark Z. Danielewski
*The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman
*The Arrival - Shaun Tan
*One - Richard Bach

I also have a lot of favourite books that aren't fiction but I think this thread meant fiction. I'll only mention two because they're worth mentioning:

*The Book of General Ignorance
*The Book of Animal Ignorance

They're quite interesting :wink:



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07 Nov 2009, 7:53 pm

iquanyin wrote:
this cool thread reminds me of more books i've loved:


jersey thursday -- steinbeck

breakfast of champions -- kurt vonnegut jr

illuminati trilogy (satire) -- robert anton wilson

the man who mistook his wife for a hat -- ?

the holographic universe -- michael talbot ( i *think*)

wake up to your life -- ?

gaudy night -- dorothy sayers



household saints -- mary gordon


The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat was written by Oliver Sacks, a neurologist. He was the doctor Robin Williams played in Awakenings. I think his Anthropologist On Mars is based on Temple Grandin.


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07 Nov 2009, 8:05 pm

'Do Andriods Dream of Electronic Sheep' - this book is pretty huge philosophically, especially when taken from the perspective of Aspergers. What is the test used to determine if a being is android or human? - empathy!



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07 Nov 2009, 10:00 pm

FeralAspie wrote:
'Do Andriods Dream of Electronic Sheep' - this book is pretty huge philosophically, especially when taken from the perspective of Aspergers. What is the test used to determine if a being is android or human? - empathy!


Yeah... I've posted this elsewhere but I think Do Androids/Blade Runner is one of the few times when the movie is better than the book (25th anniversary Final Cut is great).

And, I firmly believe that empathy is what separates human beings from human animals, aspie or not.... just my opinion.

BACK ON TOPIC!

I love Frederik Pohl's Gateway series, Beyond the Blue Event Horizon is probably the best of the series.
Quote:
On the surface of Venus Humanity has discovered traces of an alien civilisation: the tunnels built by the "Heechee" aliens. Next, Gateway itself is discovered. Gateway is an asteroid honey-combed by the Heechee, converted untold millennia ago into a starbase for alien space craft. There are no aliens left there, almost no alien artifacts, except there are a large number of functioning alien space craft.

The problem is that there appears to be no way to usefully control these craft, to set their course to a known destination, or to determine what course is to be followed. All that would-be pilots can do is to randomly set the controls and hope that, firstly, the craft will firstly reach an interesting destination, and secondly, and more importantly, that the craft will return, as they do automatically, before the human-provided life-support systems give out.

So spacecraft go out from Gateway, returning after days or months, with crew alive or frequently dead, and sometimes, but rarely, with treasure discovered.

Desperate adventurers from Earth travel to Gateway, and then venture out on the ships seeking their fortune. Most die, some hang on taking safer missions only when their funds are exhausted, and the very, very few make the big strike to find something of incalculable value.




Tom Clancy's Red Storm Rising an account of WWIII NATO v Warsaw Pact set in the late 80s is awesome!

Jerzy Kosinski's The Painted Bird is an extremely disturbing account of a young boy's life in Poland during WWII. I'm gonna take a class in holocaust lit. next term just so I can write a paper on it!! !

A couple more honorable mentions:

Harry Harrison's West of Eden series, about dinosaurs evolving in tandem with man.

and Iain Banks Wasp Factory, I just cracked that book open the other day, but it promises to be a great, creepy and disturbing read! Iain Banks Culture series is great too, if you like space opera...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_series


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07 Nov 2009, 10:26 pm

Philip K. Dick, who wrote Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep (Basis for Blade Runner) is an interesting writer. I would recommend The Three Stigmata Of Palmer Eldritch for one. He wrote a lot about philosophical ideas.


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07 Nov 2009, 11:45 pm

GoonSquad wrote:
... and Iain Banks Wasp Factory, I just cracked that book open the other day, but it promises to be a great, creepy and disturbing read!


Seconded! Wasp Factory is great.

What I love is books where you get inside someone's head totally and all their thoughts. I think that is important for an aspie because it makes it easier to follow the motivations. That's why I love the likes of Dostoyevsky and Aldous Huxley - their works are totally from inside the main character's heads.



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08 Nov 2009, 7:02 am

FeralAspie wrote:
GoonSquad wrote:
... and Iain Banks Wasp Factory, I just cracked that book open the other day, but it promises to be a great, creepy and disturbing read!


Seconded! Wasp Factory is great.

What I love is books where you get inside someone's head totally and all their thoughts. I think that is important for an aspie because it makes it easier to follow the motivations. That's why I love the likes of Dostoyevsky and Aldous Huxley - their works are totally from inside the main character's heads.


I'm going to try and find that one at the library today.


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08 Nov 2009, 12:51 pm

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
The Westing Game; forgot who the author was
Night by Elie Wiesel
Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare
House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
The Tell-Tale Heart and The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe
The Crucible by Arthur Miller

These are all I can think of off the top of my head. I also recall reading The Scarlet Letter and it was okay, but not exactly one of my favorites.



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08 Nov 2009, 11:04 pm

Atlas Shrugged

Anna Karenina :heart:

War and Peace

A Tale of Two Cities

None of them require introduction, I hope.



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09 Nov 2009, 12:08 am

I've been wanting to post something to this thread, but I couldn't really think of any books that I would consider "favorites." I gave it some thought, though, and there are a couple of books that I have read and re-read repeatedly, so I'll mention those.

On Love and Barley, Basho

It's a collection of Basho's poetry. He's a 17th century Japanese poet who wrote in haiku (I think he is also credited with developing, or at least popularizing, the form...please correct me if I'm wrong). It's a small book, and it often rode in a coat pocket when I was out and about. It's nearly worn out, and I'll probably have to buy another copy.

The Outsider, Colin Wilson

Wilson wrote an analysis of "The Outsider," a person who exists outside the mainstream of society and perceives, thinks, and feels things differently than those around him/her, using people like Nietzsche, Van Gogh, Kafka, Najinksy, and Dostoevsky as examples. For much of the book I felt like I was reading about myself, except the author was articulating how I felt much better than I ever could. I've been reading this book since well before I'd ever heard of Asperger's. I used to read this book every year or so.



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09 Nov 2009, 10:08 pm

CockneyRebel wrote:
I enjoy reading the works of Charles Dickens.


Me too, A Christmas Carol is my favorite, however I like his others as well.

Also enjoy the works of Twain, Shakespeare and Doyle.

Harry Potter Series

Christy

Cradle of the Deep

I listed fiction books I enjoy, however I spend just as much time, if not more, reading science texts (medical/biological mainly).


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09 Nov 2009, 10:27 pm

I am, at present, working my way through David Copperfield.

CockneyRebel wrote:
I enjoy reading the works of Charles Dickens.



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09 Nov 2009, 10:36 pm

My favorite books are house plan books. As far as fiction---I don't read it much at all. The last fiction novel I read for the pure pleasure of it was probably Flowers in the Attic back in the 1980's.


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10 Nov 2009, 5:08 am

I'm in the middle of The Picture of Dorian Gray, it's good so far.
My favorite book is The Golden Compass. (And the rest of the trilogy, but especially the first.)


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