Catatonia but not Autistic Catatonia?

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Xelebes
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27 Nov 2009, 5:51 pm

My clinical psychologist wrote in my psych eval that my catatonia could be related to Asperger's. I'm asking if anyone has heard of catatonia being present that is not autistic catatonia?


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Maggiedoll
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27 Nov 2009, 6:03 pm

Xelebes wrote:
My clinical psychologist wrote in my psych eval that my catatonia could be related to Asperger's. I'm asking if anyone has heard of catatonia being present that is not autistic catatonia?

I generally think of catatonia as being related to schizophrenia.



ChangelingGirl
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27 Nov 2009, 6:14 pm

Maggiedoll wrote:
Xelebes wrote:
My clinical psychologist wrote in my psych eval that my catatonia could be related to Asperger's. I'm asking if anyone has heard of catatonia being present that is not autistic catatonia?

I generally think of catatonia as being related to schizophrenia.


Catatonia can be caused by many different conditions, both physical and mental. It is not a diagnosis in itself (except in the DSM there's this label "catatonia due to a general medical condition", but then still there is an underlying physical condition), but rather a symptom of an underlying disorder. That disorde rhas to be assessed, because as I said it could be physical. If there is no physical cause for the catatonia, it could be related to autism ("autistic catatonia" has very strict criteria, but not everyone with catatonic symptoms and autism meets these), or due to anothe rmental disorder if Xelebes has one.



Willard
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27 Nov 2009, 6:22 pm

Quote:
While catatonia is only identified as a form of schizophrenia in present psychiatric classifications, it is increasingly recognized as a syndrome with many faces. It appears as the Kahlbaum syndrome (retarded catatonia), malignant catatonia (neuroleptic malignant syndrome, toxic serotonin syndrome), and excited forms (delirious mania, catatonic excitement, oneirophrenia).[5] It has also been recognized as grafted on to autistic spectrum disorders.

- Wikipedia




Every gal with My Catatonia
Might have just Kahlbaum, Not My Catatonia
So if you're diagnosed with My Catatonia
You may be somewhere else in the Syn-drome

- They Might Be Doctors :P



Lyriel
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27 Nov 2009, 6:26 pm

I know that catatonia can present in PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder); I remember watching an episode of Oprah recently about a wounded soldier whose service dog, as part of her job, would lick her soldier's face when he went into a catatonic state to help bring him out of it.



Callista
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27 Nov 2009, 10:40 pm

Awww! What a smart dog. I love service dogs.

Actually, my cat can get me out of a perseveration cycle. It can be just enough to break my hyperfocus and get me more aware of, "hey, wait a minute, the rest of the world exists!". He doesn't do it deliberately, though, just when he needs to be fed. More's the pity; I could really use an animal that knows when I'm three hours overdue for whatever I was supposed to be doing because I'm stuck on something else. I could do without dog spit on my face, though. Blecch.


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EnglishInvader
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27 Nov 2009, 11:00 pm

Callista wrote:
I could do without dog spit on my face, though. Blecch.


Female Alsatians can be a lot less boisterous than their male counterparts. My family had one and you could take her for a walk without a leash and she would remain right beside you. The male ones we had would dart off before you could even blink.

The most you would have got from Jackie would have been a sniff on your arm. She didn't drool and jump up at you all that much.

Her biggest claim to fame is that you could leave her alone in your home and reasonably expect not to see a Turner and Hooch style demolition job when you got back.



sinsboldly
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28 Nov 2009, 1:01 am

Callista wrote:
Awww! What a smart dog. I love service dogs.

Actually, my cat can get me out of a perseveration cycle. It can be just enough to break my hyperfocus and get me more aware of, "hey, wait a minute, the rest of the world exists!". He doesn't do it deliberately, though, just when he needs to be fed. More's the pity; I could really use an animal that knows when I'm three hours overdue for whatever I was supposed to be doing because I'm stuck on something else. I could do without dog spit on my face, though. Blecch.


my cat brings me back from WP or what ever I am doing for hours and hours and hours by laying on his back and streching. I used to think he wanted his belly scratched, but actually, he just wants to be admired. So I have a cat admiring break. :lol:


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