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B19
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05 Apr 2018, 7:14 pm

What stance does it take on autism issues?



Giggigoofer
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05 Apr 2018, 8:20 pm

We believe people on the spectrum have as much right as any other human to live their life the way they choose, and that the world around them needs to change in order to properly accept and adapt to the needs of autistic people.
We work on evidence-based science when providing information and support to families (which is out main role), and we work in partnership with Altogether Autism NZ.
We support change to the disability support systems and educational systems to better include neurodiverse people and people with any other disability.

Feel free to ask me any questions, if I don't know the answer myself, I can ask my colleagues.



KatosJabay
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14 May 2018, 8:45 pm

autistictravelcoach dot com

I help others on the spectrum travel with less stress. You can find me on Twitter and Facebook @ASDTravelCoach.



liminal
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10 Nov 2018, 5:57 am

I did a thing:

https://neurodiversethoughts.wordpress.com/

Tell me what you think.


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B19
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10 Nov 2018, 6:24 am

Please keep writing. You have valuable perspectives to offer.

A few months ago I was talking with my NT daughter, who is married to a very accomplished professor, an AS man, and as I know his fields of interest, science in general, electrical engineering and maths in particular, every year for many years I have sent him books relevant to his special interests and abilities as Christmas and birthday presents. I happened to ask her what he thought of one particular book I had sent, and was absolutely astonished, after all these years, to hear her tell me "Mum, W. doesn't read books".

I could hardly believe my ears. One year, I sent him a novel instead, "The Rosie Project", about an AS academic man who falls in love with an NT woman, and they transverse their differences successfully, and was fascinated to hear her say that they had "read it together" ie she had read it out loud to him, and he liked it, but that was the only time.

After that I sent him socks decorated with mathematical formulas and he actually said he liked those, which was a contrast I belatedly realised to his total silence about all the books over the years!



liminal
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11 Nov 2018, 4:16 am

B19 wrote:
Please keep writing. You have valuable perspectives to offer.


Thank you for your kind words. A perspective on empathy will be put up soon (soonish).


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B19
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11 Nov 2018, 4:35 am

Good, I'll look forward to it.



ASPartOfMe
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14 Feb 2019, 2:12 am

The Autism History Project - University of Oregon

A new history of autism traces the diagnosis of a disability

Quote:
As interest in autism spread from scholarly journals to dinner tables and the evening news, UO historian Ellen Herman saw a gap.

The internet is full of research and debate, but Herman found little in the way of context. Always on the lookout for ways to use research to meet a common need, she decided to help fill that gap with a project tracing the modern history of autism from its early recognition to today.

The Autism History Project highlights the people, ideas and topics that were instrumental in shaping autism during the 20th century in the United States. She hopes the website fills a void in the conversation about autism, which has surged in recent years as more families, educators and workers are touched by those diagnosed with the disorder.

“In the last 20 years, there’s been a flood of information, narratives and media attention to autism, but there’s been very little about its history,” said Herman, who also serves as the UO’s vice provost for academic affairs and faculty co-director for the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics.

When Herman noticed the heightened interest in autism and the lack of historical context, she saw an opportunity to contribute to public discourse and understanding through her research. So she spent several years digging into archival material around the country to investigate autism’s history, notable figures and important milestones.

When Herman noticed the heightened interest in autism and the lack of historical context, she saw an opportunity to contribute to public discourse and understanding through her research. So she spent several years digging into archival material around the country to investigate autism’s history, notable figures and important milestones.

Her new website, which was launched in January, presents some of her findings in a way that’s accessible to a broad audience.

The website includes a number of different components that weave together a comprehensive history of autism. One of these is a collection of profiles about people who have played critical roles in the history of autism, including Hans Asperger, whose name later became affiliated with a diagnosis; Lauretta Bender, a psychiatrist who researched childhood schizophrenia; and Clara Park, an author who published a trailblazing memoir in 1967 about her experience parenting an autistic child.

Park’s child Jessica went on to become an accomplished visual artist who has had her work exhibited in universities, museums, galleries — and throughout Herman’s website. When Herman considered the best visuals to accompany her research, Clark’s art was an ideal and fitting choice.

“I am so grateful to Jessica for allowing me to use her beautiful works of art on this website,” Herman said.

The website also contains a timeline, a glossary and a series of essays that cover pivotal topics about autism, like outlining where the term autism originated and considering the autism gender gap. Herman also included an archive of annotated original sources, an effort to integrate both digestible nuggets of information and complete sources into the website.


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