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Ganondox
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26 Oct 2014, 9:22 pm

anbuend wrote:
ASgirl wrote:
asperger syndrome is often referred to as an "invisiable" disability so i don't think one can tell who has the disorder and who hasn't. of course some aspies might have more noticeable physical traits such as tics and stimming but they are not restricted to aspies (people with Tourettes for instance have them).


invisible disability doesn't mean that it's impossible to tell. It just means the average person wouldn't notice because the characteristics are not well known. A paraplegic may be visible in a wheelchair but not in bed.

See:

http://www.ragged-edge-mag.com/0301/0301ft1.htm
http://www.disabilityhistory.org/dwa/qu ... omery.html

I am fairly good at spotting neuro-atypical people with supposedly "invisible" disabilities. It's there in posture, walk, sound of voice, lots of other things. I have an online friend who would autie spot and run up to people and cheerfully ask if they were autistic and go "cool!" if they were. She was usually right.

When I was a kid and could often hide my stimming in public, a neighbor says I "walked as if my arms and legs were too heavy for my body" and a bunch of other stuff. And other kids could spot it as they would come up and call me a retard or a spaz or a psycho.


The way I see it, with invisible disabilities you can't tell if they are disabled or not based on their appearance/behavior, but once you know it's there, it's easy to connect some very subtle physical traits with the disability, like a slightly abnormal gait or intonation.


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lyverbyrd
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03 Aug 2016, 1:05 pm

I think we have a bit of a "look" about us, and a few little giveaways, but I think we know what to look for. Odd posture, unusual gait, flat affect face (or resting b***h face in my case).

I think it's possibly a little harder to tell in Aspies who, like myself, were diagnosed in mid life. But I'm 46 and I wear converse and batman tshirts and my face looks much younger. Always did look much younger, even in my childhood, would be mistaken for 5 at the age of 10.

All part of life's rich pattern, eh....


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golda
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03 Aug 2016, 2:27 pm

Of the few oddities, I have noticed:

- I am told the way I walk is strange. I have a bouncy walk and walk on my toes a bit.
- I have a child-like voice.
- Leg-bouncing.
- I have a very stiff posture.

- G



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04 Aug 2016, 8:24 am

Kaysea wrote:
Some traits that most of us whom I have met in person (and pics posted on WP) seem to share:

Body:
Long Arms
Bony wrists
Slightly bell-shaped rib cage
Shorter-than-average distance between the ribs and hips
Shorter-than-average necks
Square shoulders
Arms hang out to the side, instead of being directed straight downward.

Head/Face:
Intense or dreamy, deep-set eyes
Eyes slightly too close together
Prominent features
Large head
High, wide forehead


Yep, I have most of these, but I have short arms and a small head, and my shoulders are narrow and tend to roll forward. However my head probably looks large in proportion to my shoulders. And my shoulders naturally sort of hunch up, I can't really drop them or relax them, which makes my arms feel awkward.


Laz wrote:
For some reason in recent years they seem to have downplayed the old physical signs that would of been part of a diagnosis back in the 1990's

Asymetrical face. In the traditional ancient greek ideal of beauty. This was something that was studied in the 1990's I don't know if anything came of it. There was some kind of theory that people on the spectrum are more asymetrical in their facial features then the mainstream population.

Rose coloured cheeks. The people who advocate the gluten/casein diet claim this is a reaction to the Heroin substrates that are present in the body from eating gluten all sounds a bit pseudo science to me

Unusual Gait, that I most certainly have

Poor gross motor control (But not to the same degree as Dyspraxia)

No natural sense of balance (Cross over with Dyspraxia)


I have all of these too.


HighPlateau wrote:
Movement gets a para all to itself. All movement is planned. Say in a crowded market I always have my destination point in sight before taking the first step. Difficult to modify route without breaking stride but must be done in order to avoid bumping into people or having them touch me.


I do this too.



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04 Aug 2016, 8:29 am

Barliman wrote:
At age 48 I finally identified the cause of these problems as being a subluxed atlas ( Atlas on skull subluxation) and had it treated at a single sitting by a method called Atlas Profilax. This killed off a good number of my ADHD symptoms as well as relieving my neck and back pain- but I still found all sorts of things very stressful- triggering racing heart and unpredictable episodes of cognitive fog. (now manifesting as fatigue rather than ADHD).

Quite recently I met a chiropractor who is an enthusiast of Melillo's work and he convinced me that he knew enough to be interesting. The point is that he has in a few weeks taught me a series of simple exercises that can more or less turn off most of my residual symptoms at will. The treatment was easy, cheap and straightforwards.

The critical points are that atlas subluxation is very common- common enough to be a causative factor in both ADHD and autism, that atlas subluxation causes a sort of autonomic hypersensitivity - which is a common issue in both ADHD and autism.


This is very interesting! I don't know if I have a skull subluxation...but that would explain a lot. My back is pretty messed up. I have scoliosis, lower back problems, and my neck juts forward and to one side. My neck cracks a lot when I move my head around.



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04 Aug 2016, 1:31 pm

I seriously doubt that there are any purely physical differences in people with Asperger's. We may look different based on how we hold our face or smile, or be built different due to lack of exercise, or have odd posture or gait, but other than that, I don't think there's any difference. I have a few things that stand out like being very tall and thin, having slight scoliosis, having long arms and a long neck, and having a prominent dimple in my chin, but my neurotypical mother has all of those characteristics, so it's probably not due to Asperger's.



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05 Aug 2016, 11:46 am

If all of these "physical signs" were accurate, then ASDs would be easier to diagnose. Also, every thread here that's about physical features in Autism seem to state different ones each time, as though these physical features are just invented by people on the spectrum picking random features on their body what have nothing to do with their neurological condition.


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JoeNavy
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07 May 2017, 10:54 am

I was often told that I walked funny when I was younger. My eyes are very deep-set-almost cavernous, but a bit narrowly spaced for the size of my big head. While I have short arms and broad shoulders, my neck pushes my head forward and I have very prominent brows and a broad forehead. My eldest daughter (also likely on the spectrum, testing next month) often says that I look very much like artistic renderings of a Neanderthal except for the lower slope of the forehead and I actually do have a chin. I honestly think that except for some cases in which microcephaly is an issue, the look thing would be very hit or miss. The body in motion would be where the more likely determination would come from.


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28 Apr 2019, 10:35 am

FaeryEthereal wrote:
I've noticed how many aspies are either extremely thin, classic ectomorphs or are BIG. I am one of the extremely thin ones, stick thin my entire life, went through my teens and never did fill out. I have long very thin arms and legs, tiny bony wrists, exceptionally pale skin, tiny head, big eyes and body language and facial expressions which I've been told comes across as hostile and guarded. I walk very fast, much faster than anyone else and have a stiff, slightly awkward gait.

This is so TRUE.



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28 Apr 2019, 10:45 am

It is all so FALSE.

Every so-called sign or symptom can be explained away with normal behavior, normal development, or other common disorders. For instance, there is a much wider range of normal behaviors than autistic behaviors.

There is no “Aspie-dar”. It’s all in your imaginations.


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28 Apr 2019, 12:11 pm

Fnord wrote:
It is all so FALSE.

Every so-called sign or symptom can be explained away with normal behavior, normal development, or other common disorders. For instance, there is a much wider range of normal behaviors than autistic behaviors.

There is no “Aspie-dar”. It’s all in your imaginations.


One can at best notice behaviors associated with Autism. Besides what was said above you have no idea of the internal thinking precess of the person, nor if the behaviors observed are unusual for that person.

FaeryEthereal wrote:
I've noticed how many aspies are either extremely thin, classic ectomorphs or are BIG. I am one of the extremely thin ones, stick thin my entire life, went through my teens and never did fill out. I have long very thin arms and legs, tiny bony wrists, exceptionally pale skin, tiny head, big eyes and body language and facial expressions which I've been told comes across as hostile and guarded. I walk very fast, much faster than anyone else and have a stiff, slightly awkward gait.

Obesity takes heavy toll on children with autism
Quote:
In 2014, Broder-Fingert and her colleagues reported results from the first large, rigorous study to investigate obesity in autism. Looking at nearly 6,700 children, they found that those with autism are two times more likely to be overweight, and nearly five times more likely to be obese, than their typical peers.

My opinion is obesity is a symptom of other core autistic issues particularly sedentary lifestyle caused by obsession with special interest keeping one on the computer, fear of going out of the home due to social failures, repetitive eating of foods particularly ones that are bad for you to ease the pain of loneliness, lack of sex etc).


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28 Apr 2019, 1:09 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Fnord wrote:
It is all so FALSE. Every so-called sign or symptom can be explained away with normal behavior, normal development, or other common disorders. For instance, there is a much wider range of normal behaviors than autistic behaviors. There is no “Aspie-dar”. It’s all in your imaginations.
One can at best notice behaviors associated with Autism. Besides what was said above you have no idea of the internal thinking precess of the person, nor if the behaviors observed are unusual for that person...
Yes. For instance, a stranger might be in mourning for a lost job, pet or person. Because of this, they may walk with their head down and their shoulders slumped. They may also be non-verbal and reluctant to make eye contact. This does not mean that the person is autistic, and unless he or she tells you why he or she is behaving this way, we will not know for certain.

Thus it is not only erroneous, but presumptuous to make any “diagnosis” of an autism spectrum disorder.

Again, there is no such thing as “Aspiedar” or any other “psychic” ability that allows an Aspie to correctly identify a complete stranger as an Aspie.


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28 Apr 2019, 1:23 pm

I definitely fell for the Baader-Meinhof effect (frequency illusion) for a while following my diagnosis. In examining my behaviours from a new perspective, I started noticing them all around me, reinforcing and reinforced by the imposter syndrome that I went through at first - either I wasn't an Aspie, or it was so common as to be unremarkable; or so it seemed. A little later, I disclosed my diagnosis to a small circle of trusted friends - and discovered that two of them had also been diagnosed not long prior to me. I would never have guessed they they were the two who might have this in common with me, nor had either of them guessed that about me. We'd all known each other for well over a decade.

To most of us to a greater or lesser extent, it's natural that we think of our own experience of autism as the definitive one. As I think this thread demonstrates, this can easily lead to the faulty reasoning; I'm autistic; I have trait X; therefore everyone with trait X is autistic. For casual encounters, there is no opportunity to be contradicted, and not having been proved wrong isn't the same as being proved right. I do know a couple of people who, only after many very long discussions about our reasoning and perceptual processes, I've reached a consensus with that there are reasonable grounds for suspicion (one is currently seeking formal diagnosis.) But fantasising that every person who walks a little strangely might be a potention Aspie-buddy? No, I've learned my lesson.


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28 Apr 2019, 7:24 pm

FaeryEthereal wrote:
I've noticed how many aspies are either extremely thin, classic ectomorphs or are BIG.
I've noticed many people in general are either thin or big. You're basically describing the general population.

FaeryEthereal wrote:
I am one of the extremely thin ones, stick thin my entire life, went through my teens and never did fill out.
Well you're lucky! I went through my teens and was diagnosed with obesity. What's it like to be able to eat something without feeling guilty afterwards?

I realise that some women feel upset about being flat chested but really I don't think it would be good to have big heavy things attached to your body that only get used for a few months out of your life, if at all. Better to be flat chested and be able to run without tearing the ligaments in your chest due to the massive swinging weights on your chest.

FaeryEthereal wrote:
I walk very fast
Same. I feel like I have two speeds. Stationary and power walking. I don't understand why fit, able bodied people walk around really slowly. If I've already made up my mind to go somewhere, I don't see any reason to waste time in getting there.


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