Will they let me use a calculator in college?

Page 2 of 2 [ 28 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Blasty
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Apr 2008
Age: 34
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,205
Location: At my workbench

09 Jun 2010, 8:31 pm

DrS wrote:
I think the opposite. What's the point of trig/calculus/algebra in the real world? Arithmetic has more use. I'm not against teaching people the new math, but I certainly don't privilege it over useful arithmetic skills.


Lots. This post is being brought to you on your computer that uses reactive components whose behavior is described by calculus, powered by AC current whose phase and amplitude is described by trig functions. This stuff is even a legitimate use of imaginary numbers that we've all scoffed at in the past. They are essential in electronics and power systems.

As for calculators, it really depends on the course and the professor's discretion. I've had math classes that only allow a 4-function calculator, when the concepts need to be learned by hand. My higher level classes allow even a TI-89 to assist you, but they still require you to show that you know what you're doing.



DrS
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 7 Feb 2010
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 155

10 Jun 2010, 3:34 pm

Hmm, I should be clearer. The use of it to an individual knowing it.



MattTheTubaGuy
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jun 2010
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 96
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand

10 Jun 2010, 7:23 pm

I am doing 2 maths, 2 physics, a physics lab, and a physical chemistry course this semester.
for physics you need a calculator, same with chemistry. the lab course used calculators but it doesn't have an exam.
the two maths courses I am doing, one of them is Calculus, and i can NOT use a calculator in this one. the other maths course is cryptography, and I am allowed to use a calculator, because it sometimes involves reasonably large numbers.

I think all calculus courses won't allow calculators, because those courses are focusing on the mathematical concepts, as opposed to physics where you actually use these concepts with real numbers.


_________________
"Never memorize what you can look up in books" Albert Einstein
"It's kind of fun to do the impossible." Walt Disney


Pobodys_Nerfect
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 600
Location: New Zealand

11 Jun 2010, 4:08 am

You can probably get past MCAT papers. If you can, then you should coz all the cheeky NTs will be. They probably don't change the questions much. Do you have a good maths text book to learn from?



PunkyKat
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 May 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,492
Location: Kalahari Desert

12 Jun 2010, 10:26 pm

I simply cannot memorize the multiplication tables and that's why I need a calculator. I can't do simple arethmitic without using my fingers.

DrS wrote:
PunkyKat wrote:


PunkyKat wrote:
If I am not allowed to use a calculator for the addition, subtraction, multiplacation and division, I will fail and will never get into vet school and if I cannot not get into vet school, finishing high school is not worth it to me.


It's hard enough getting through life without deciding to give up trying when you've barely begun.


What's that supposed to mean?


_________________
I'm not weird, you're just too normal.


Pobodys_Nerfect
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 600
Location: New Zealand

13 Jun 2010, 2:29 am

Why not just do the multiplication on scrap paper in the test using addition? Say you had to multiply 12x8, let a circle equal 5, write two circles and then two ones, so; OOII, so that equals 12. Then just write a column of them underneath 8 times, then you just add up the circles quickly by going, "5, 10, 15, 20 etc" and write down the answer, then add up all the ones, then add those two numbers.



PunkyKat
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 May 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,492
Location: Kalahari Desert

14 Jun 2010, 12:17 am

Pobodys_Nerfect wrote:
Why not just do the multiplication on scrap paper in the test using addition? Say you had to multiply 12x8, let a circle equal 5, write two circles and then two ones, so; OOII, so that equals 12. Then just write a column of them underneath 8 times, then you just add up the circles quickly by going, "5, 10, 15, 20 etc" and write down the answer, then add up all the ones, then add those two numbers.


I don't even understand what you just said.


_________________
I'm not weird, you're just too normal.


DrS
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 7 Feb 2010
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 155

16 Jun 2010, 12:48 am

PunkyKat wrote:
DrS wrote:
PunkyKat wrote:
If I am not allowed to use a calculator for the addition, subtraction, multiplacation and division, I will fail and will never get into vet school and if I cannot not get into vet school, finishing high school is not worth it to me.


It's hard enough getting through life without deciding to give up trying when you've barely begun.


What's that supposed to mean?


That giving up before you try will make life a lot harder.



chessimprov
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2010
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 293
Location: Philly

16 Jun 2010, 7:25 pm

Depending on the college course, you may need a graphing calculator instead of a scientific one. It's kind of hard to cheat with graphing in some cases because you may not know what question will be on the test exactly. It will be a tool at your disposal!



kraken
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2008
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 180

26 Jun 2010, 12:49 pm

Regardless of whether you can get into veterinary school without a calculator, the chances are quite good that as a vet, you will be required to use basic arithmetic at times when a calculator is not convenient. This is a serious skill deficiency that will need to be addressed before you attempt veterinary school.



Ferronic
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2010
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 20
Location: Canada

27 Jul 2010, 3:01 pm

Where I go to University, in Canada, you are allowed scientific calculators in all of the math based classes (physics, chemistry, electronics - I'm an electrical engineer) but are not allowed ANY calculators in Calculus (or classes offered by the Math department). I had to do all my trigonometry by hand (finding angles in radians by hand is ... not awesome). However you may be able to get some leeway in that regard from Student Services (or whatever you call it). I know here, you can get other students to take notes for you if you qualify, we probably have similar policies for calculators or test extensions.

Good luck.



Stellar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Mar 2010
Age: 28
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,249
Location: California

27 Jul 2010, 8:25 pm

For the MCAT physical science section, you're going to need to memorize formulas (and know when to apply them) in order to do some of the problems. That's harder than having to do the simple math. Calculators are not allowed in the MCAT testing room. Sorry :(

But if you have trouble memorizing multiplication tables, it's going to be really hard to do calculus or stats (or any other college level math class you can use to knock out a requirement). You'll also probably suffer in physics, because most universities/cc's only have calc based physics for pre-med/pre-vet/pre-dent etc. Calculus based physics isn't require but basically it's hard to find an algebra based physics course that you can actually use to knock out one of the requirements. Good luck, and don't give up yet! You just need to try a lot of methods to figure out what works for you.

P.S. Remember that you don't need to be a science major to get into vet school. Use that to your advantage if you're not great at math. Just kick butt in the pre-req classes, and you'll be good.