How do my emotions differ from neurotypical teens emotions

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ProfessaM
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05 Jul 2010, 1:06 pm

Hi I am just curious as to how neurotypicals emotionally react and how their view on emotions differs from that of my own. I tend to think about my emotions a lot and explore them. For example the movie "Troy" affects me when this woman starts singing when something tragic happens. You could say I get in touch with it's deep sensual side. I feel this confusing wave of sadness sweep over me but I just can't explain it. I describe it as "murky" "deep" and "inexplicable" As soon as I hear the woman singing and that tragic scene happen it shows up. Anyone know what this is. It still effects me a long while after the movie finshes.



Willard
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05 Jul 2010, 2:50 pm

:wink: Why do you think the director created the scene that way? Its supposed to have that effect. I don't think it touches everyone to the same level of emotional depth, however - some people don't even seem to be affected at all, for most its only a mood-setter - but like you, I am often moved not just to tears, but reduced to sobbing by things in a film that others don't resonate to at all, or at least not much.

I don't know that the emotions of an Autistic are essentially any different than those of anyone else, but perhaps because we have such a difficult time expressing and conveying our emotional life and sharing our feelings with those around us, symbolic representations that we deeply identify with take on a greater significance to us than they do to the neurotypical brain.

Or maybe that's just me. :roll:

I mean, I think because I have such a hard time sharing with humans, when I see something or read something or hear something in music that expresses deep feelings that have been pent up or unexpressed for a long time, they just come flooding out and overwhelm me. :cry:



TheSpecialKid
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05 Jul 2010, 5:29 pm

Willard wrote:
Or maybe that's just me. :roll:

That is NOT just you. I have it the exact same way, and now I'm very happy to know that I'm not the only one.
Thank you! :D

EDIT: I'm actually beginning to think I have some sort of synesthesia (Sound -> Physical Feeling). Maybe that could explain it, before I haven't realised that I actually had a physical feeling, but now I notice. Weird actually, cause I've always thought that was the "feelings", but I think I've learned how to seperate it now.



TruthTree
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06 Jul 2010, 12:57 am

I'm not sure of the exact part in Troy you're talking about, but generally, I get those "murky" "deep" and "inexplicable" feelings during movies all the time.
Later if I were to tell someone about the movie, I'd simply describe it as "moving", or "emotional".

I think the reason that the emotions we get from these kind of movies are inexplicable is because they often don't have a 'point' to make. As Willard says, they're just designed to make you feel.

In short, I don't think our emotions are all that different.
But yours might be more intense, and maybe you think about it more than a NT would.



Brainiac5
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06 Jan 2011, 1:12 pm

I'm not an expert, but I don't think there is much difference in the basic way we Aspies have emotions and how NTs do. The perceived differences actually come from Aspies' difficulty in expressing and communicating emotion, making it difficult for others to understand what we are experiencing. Also, Aspies do often see the world differently from NTs, which leads to having different types of emotional reaction to certain situation. But keep in mind that everyone is different as well, so different people will have varying emotional reactions to begin with.