Page 2 of 2 [ 26 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

frag
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Aug 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 501
Location: Scändinävia

11 Aug 2010, 4:23 am

StuartN wrote:
frag wrote:
Con.. if I would want to visit USA I can't. Autistic people from my country can't get a Visa to USA.


I assume you mean the visa application question "Do you have a communicable disease, physical or mental disorder, or are you a drug abuser or addict?"

Do you have any evidence that this applies to Asperger's syndrome or to autism? My reading of the question is that the correct response is "no", it is not any of those things.

So I don't not think it is true that autistic people can't get a USA visa.


Well I asked and yup it does apply. I know normally we don't see Asperger's as an illness but in this case they assume it is. They want to know about any disability far as I've been told.



StuartN
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,569

11 Aug 2010, 10:05 am

frag wrote:
Well I asked and yup it does apply. I know normally we don't see Asperger's as an illness but in this case they assume it is. They want to know about any disability far as I've been told.


If you are seriously claiming that answering the question "Do you have a communicable disease, physical or mental disorder, or are you a drug abuser or addict?" with "Asperger's syndrome" or with "autism" is a bar to entry to the USA, then I am sure that you are mistaken. I am not aware that anyone has been barred entry to the USA for this reason, whether they answered "no", "Asperger's syndrome" or "autism".

Assuming that you have evidence (a letter of rejection etc) that you have been refused entry to the USA because you have autism, then you have cause for a serious complaint, and at the very least should contact your local autism organisation, a news reporter, your own citizens advice network or some other advocacy network.

(Just to be sure that I am being clear, I do not believe your claim).



ksuther09
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 29 Jun 2010
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 154
Location: Fort Collins, CO

11 Aug 2010, 5:28 pm

First of all, congrats for getting into graduate school!! ! :) That's awesome!! ! Being a nerd is fun.

I just recently got diagnosed, and actually, I was 90% sure I'd get the AS diagnosis, but it turned out to be PPD-NOS (atypical autism) because I didn't fit into classic (Kanner's) Autism or Aspergers. Anyway, that's one nice thing about a diagnosis is you can finally get an accurate picture of what's happening.

The pro is that all the struggles in my life that I couldn't figure out & my mom couldn't figure out make sense now. Also, there are resources for students & job seekers on the spectrum. You just have to know where to look. I'd get going on finding the job seeking stuff & trying to discover what fits for you now - as much as you can in grad school - because it's true, the real world is a lot different than grad school!! !!

The con is that it is stressful. I won't lie, it caused me to rearrange my identity some. Suddenly I had this new piece of my identity that in one sense was always there, but now had a name. It also unearthed (at least for me) some painful stuff in my past & I think that's another reason it was stressful.

About telling the parents, I haven't told mine yet, but plan to at some point. However, the questionnaires that others fill out can be filled out by friends you trust that have been around you a lot or even your advisor if you think he/she has interacted with you closely.

Find someone who's familiar with the ADOS. That's the best diagnostic tool out there. Best wishes to you!! ! :)



frag
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Aug 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 501
Location: Scändinävia

11 Aug 2010, 10:19 pm

StuartN wrote:
frag wrote:
Well I asked and yup it does apply. I know normally we don't see Asperger's as an illness but in this case they assume it is. They want to know about any disability far as I've been told.


If you are seriously claiming that answering the question "Do you have a communicable disease, physical or mental disorder, or are you a drug abuser or addict?" with "Asperger's syndrome" or with "autism" is a bar to entry to the USA, then I am sure that you are mistaken. I am not aware that anyone has been barred entry to the USA for this reason, whether they answered "no", "Asperger's syndrome" or "autism".

Assuming that you have evidence (a letter of rejection etc) that you have been refused entry to the USA because you have autism, then you have cause for a serious complaint, and at the very least should contact your local autism organisation, a news reporter, your own citizens advice network or some other advocacy network.

(Just to be sure that I am being clear, I do not believe your claim).


Then you call me a liar. I'll remember that.



StuartN
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,569

12 Aug 2010, 3:45 am

frag wrote:
StuartN wrote:
(Just to be sure that I am being clear, I do not believe your claim).


Then you call me a liar. I'll remember that.


Your claim is an extremely serious issue, potentially affecting many thousands of people just from my country wishing to travel to the USA. I do not think it is appropriate to leave such a serious claim unchallenged when that claim has been made without any supporting evidence whatsoever, and contrary to all my own experience.

This thread is about pros and cons of diagnosis. A lifelong prohibition on international travel would impact me greatly, but there has not been any problem whatsoever with my diagnosis. I do not believe that having Asperger's syndrome or autism is a barrier to obtaining travel visas.



frag
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Aug 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 501
Location: Scändinävia

12 Aug 2010, 6:32 am

You have to realize different countries have different demands on them. Maybe YOU can easily travel from your country, doesn't mean I can.

I even know someone from a Middle Eastern country who couldn't get a Visa because he was "too poor" and did not own property in his own country.

Check with your Visa office in your own country. Is my advice.



valley
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 8 Apr 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 5
Location: worcestershire

08 Apr 2016, 10:04 am

throughout my childhood many educational psychologists had pointed out that I presented many ASD characteristics. so I have known for sometime that I am somewhere on the spectrum, I have been given many opportunities to be diagnosed. I never wanted a diagnosis, I had researched in part what the characteristics of ASD area to try and understand what difficulties I may have. I never wanted a diagnosis because I didn't want ASD to be a real confirmed part of my life, I didn't (and still don't) want to know what I will find difficult in the future as it makes me feel upset.

now at 20 I am going to get diagnosed.
is this a similar feeling people had about having a diagnosis and how do you feel after it.



AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 58
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,118
Location: Brigham City, Utah

08 Apr 2016, 10:16 am

Actually, no. I considered the idea of a diagnosis to be a cool pursuit.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


valley
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 8 Apr 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 5
Location: worcestershire

08 Apr 2016, 10:33 am

so do you feel that having the diagnosis helped you cope.
I have had a similar experience with my diagnosis of dyslexia, it empowered me.
but am still apprehensive.



neverknew
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 7 Feb 2016
Age: 60
Gender: Female
Posts: 30
Location: Arizona

08 Apr 2016, 6:01 pm

I just want to say something about traveling to the USA and traveling abroad in general.

You need two things to travel:
1. A passport issued by your country of origin. In the USA the Federal Government issues passports and they are good for 10 years.
2. A visa issued by the country you intend to visit. You apply at the Embassy or Consulate of the country you want to travel to that is located in the country you are currently in. Every country decides how long their visas are valid and how much they cost

Without spending time on Google, I would say I am 99.9% certain the US would not discriminate and refuse a visa to a person with autism or any other non-infectious condition.

It's called civil rights and we even extend them to immigrants who entered the US illegally.

The media would go wild with a story like this. Everybody could blame everybody else. The talking heads would explode with confetti and glitter over the party they'd be having. :jester:


_________________
"What if you realized this world is an hallucination? What if you really understood you made it up?" ACIM T-20.VIII.7:3-4

ND 169/200
NT 53/200
AQ 41