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daspie
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02 Mar 2011, 2:39 pm

doeintheheadlights wrote:
Have you ever read the Qur'an, Daspie? I went to a university with a high Muslim population, was friends with many of them and still am with some. There are good and bad people in every population, just like there is good and bad in every religion. They were all good people and I enjoyed attending classes with them. Sadly some have twisted the Muslim religion and used it to do evil, but I don't use their misconception of the religion to chastise the entire Muslim population. I think it's ignorant to do so.

No I haven't read the koran. I have read a lot of its quotation, now you will say that they were out of context, I will answer this question in this post. I have seen Muslim fundamentalism in India and world over. Most of the "friends" I have had, if not all, were fundamentalist, you can't be sure about those who appears to be friendly also given that you have asperger's. Secondly, we have so many times seen common people turning out to be terrorist or becoming one. Doctors, engineers, PhD etc. Yes, there are good and bad people in every country but calculate the ration of bad people to whole population, then you will see the difference :). Just see how many religiously motivated mass murder muslims have carried out. See, what Muhammad did. The time has come when USA and Europe deport it Muslim population, I know this sounds crazy also given that these continents depend upon muslim oil, but soon people will see the effects of living in muslim neighborhood. Just go to a Muslim dominated area in Britain and you will realize what I am saying. They don't respect non-muslim police, they consider it as an enemy of Islam. I do not mean every Muslim is like this but an average muslim is more likely to be a extremist and/or an average muslim is more likely to turn extremist than a person of other religion.



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04 Mar 2011, 6:56 am

daspie wrote:
doeintheheadlights wrote:
Have you ever read the Qur'an, Daspie? I went to a university with a high Muslim population, was friends with many of them and still am with some. There are good and bad people in every population, just like there is good and bad in every religion. They were all good people and I enjoyed attending classes with them. Sadly some have twisted the Muslim religion and used it to do evil, but I don't use their misconception of the religion to chastise the entire Muslim population. I think it's ignorant to do so.

No I haven't read the koran. I have read a lot of its quotation, now you will say that they were out of context, I will answer this question in this post. I have seen Muslim fundamentalism in India and world over. Most of the "friends" I have had, if not all, were fundamentalist, you can't be sure about those who appears to be friendly also given that you have asperger's. Secondly, we have so many times seen common people turning out to be terrorist or becoming one. Doctors, engineers, PhD etc. Yes, there are good and bad people in every country but calculate the ration of bad people to whole population, then you will see the difference :). Just see how many religiously motivated mass murder muslims have carried out. See, what Muhammad did. The time has come when USA and Europe deport it Muslim population, I know this sounds crazy also given that these continents depend upon muslim oil, but soon people will see the effects of living in muslim neighborhood. Just go to a Muslim dominated area in Britain and you will realize what I am saying. They don't respect non-muslim police, they consider it as an enemy of Islam. I do not mean every Muslim is like this but an average muslim is more likely to be a extremist and/or an average muslim is more likely to turn extremist than a person of other religion.


Daspie, I'm not going to get into a debate with you because having read your previous posts in other threads, I know that your views on Islam and the Muslim population aren't likely to change. I will say this though: I think that if you are going to choose to hate an entire religion and it's people so vehemently, you should really at least read their Holy Book. Anyone can hear excerpts from holy books books and get a negative opinion. There are plenty of things in the Vedas, for example that if they are taken out of context can make Hinduism look quite bad. An example would be here: Truth of Hinduism

The Bible as well, if I had never read the Old Testament but just heard about the story of Sodom and Gomorrah, or some of the gems in Deuteronomy about rapists being obligated to marry their victims, I would probably have quite an ill view on Christianity and Judaism. However having read all of the Old Testament, I can understand the context around these excerpts and understand why they're there. Do you understand what I'm trying to say? There's nothing wrong with having an opinion on something, but to have one without informing yourself fully on the subject at hand is irresponsible and unfair to the people who you are spouting hate against.



kate123A
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06 Mar 2011, 10:44 pm

I wonder if I'm the only one that thinks this.........but if she works in a restaurant and wants to wear a scarf wouldn't that mean one less person who might get hair in food?



ruveyn
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07 Mar 2011, 3:16 am

SaNcheNuSS wrote:
The Moral of the story is that No one should work for Disney.


No. The moral of the story is that one should be aware of the terms of employment and the rules employees are to follow.

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buglet55
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22 Oct 2012, 12:53 am

Saw someone working on Star Tours ride at Disney World a couple weeks ago. She had on a hijab that matched the Star Tours costume. And on top of that she had one of those hats with the brims and flaps that kids wear to the beach or that archaeologists wear. She just looked like she came from Tatooine and was dressed for a sand storm. No one noticed. It was perfect.



hanyo
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22 Oct 2012, 4:03 pm

I find it sad how people come here yet cling to symbols of their oppression.

There are people that play the Sims that want hijabs in the game. It makes me think "what next? Mods so women can't work and can't leave their home lot without a male relative?"



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23 Oct 2012, 3:37 pm

I am curious if Disney would forbid a male of Jewish faith to wear the yarmulka. If any company permits one religious item, they must have allowances for all, safety permitting (in factories, I have heard of women not being permitted to wear rosaries, hijabs or the aabayah (abaya) because of the possibility of the item being caught in the equipment -- this rule also extends to rings, necklaces, long hair and beards and baggy clothes in general). Personally, I'd prefer a uniform for all persons if nobody can agree on how to dress appropriately (we wear black or gray suits and ties for men and pants suits for the ladies - no "loud colors") and if deemed necessary by the employer, a head covering that is barely noticeable. There are freedoms in regards to religious practice in the United States, but portions of these freedoms (items of religious significance) are checked in regards to safety issues, as I have mentioned above.

P.S. I'm still trying to logically reconcile the fact that some schools allow Sikhs to wear the kirpan in school, yet expel students for bringing a Boy Scout pocket knife on accident or nail clippers. The Kirpan is a freaking dagger! "No weapons" means "no weapons." Period/ Full-stop (as you fellas across the puddle say).



Thatmew
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25 Oct 2012, 3:20 am

On one hand, its Disney, a long lived company that's been through many rights movements.

On the other hand, its Disney, having nary but the shell of its image to protect itself.

The way I feel, perhaps with great irreligious bias is for a corporation as large as Disney and its holdings, so large that its traded publicly across multiple profiles and markets, and the employee did enter into a contract upon accepting employment.

And no offence, but I feel we need to bend over less for religious types. They can find work in their own fields if it comes to it.


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mds_02
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25 Oct 2012, 8:55 am

CyborgUprising wrote:
P.S. I'm still trying to logically reconcile the fact that some schools allow Sikhs to wear the kirpan in school, yet expel students for bringing a Boy Scout pocket knife on accident or nail clippers. The Kirpan is a freaking dagger! "No weapons" means "no weapons." Period/ Full-stop (as you fellas across the puddle say).


Kirpans, at least those worn in schools in this country, are typically fixed permanently in the sheath.


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OddDuckNash99
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26 Oct 2012, 9:26 am

While I understand the whole "complying with dress code" thing, what makes me mad about the girl not being able to wear her hijab is the fact that it's Disney telling her to not to wear it. Disney is supposed to be all about teaching kids about acceptance of other cultures and people's differences. If Aladdin were more realistic of Muslim women, Jasmine would be wearing traditional Muslim attire all throughout Agrabah, not her skimpy, revealing outfit we're accustomed to seeing her wear. :roll:


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Tequila
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27 Oct 2012, 2:13 am

daspie wrote:
No, the moral of the story is that don't employ a conservative Muslim to work in such flashy places and since you cannot make out conservative from the rest, therefore don't employ muslims in such places at all.


Wow - you're off at the deep end with this one.

Not necessarily - all it means is that all items of clothing that are considered cultural/religious or simply a nuisance shouldn't be allowed at contract stage and that people who can't accept having to take off their bags over their heads or their huge Christian crosses or their idiotic haircut. An organisation like this should have rules banning headgear, religious garments, excessive piercings and visible tattoos (they wouldn't want a female skinhead with neo-Nazi tattoos working there), and all the rest.

Basically, the rules should be set down so that all know where they stand. If religiously "conservative" Muslims or anyone else doesn't like it, it's their problem, not the company's.



Tequila
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27 Oct 2012, 2:15 am

OddDuckNash99 wrote:
If Aladdin were more realistic of Muslim women, Jasmine would be wearing traditional Muslim attire all throughout Agrabah, not her skimpy, revealing outfit we're accustomed to seeing her wear. :roll:


If Islamic fundamentalists had their way, there wouldn't be an Aladdin play. It is un-Islamic and infidel. Allahu akbar.



CyborgUprising
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27 Oct 2012, 10:53 am

mds_02 wrote:
CyborgUprising wrote:
P.S. I'm still trying to logically reconcile the fact that some schools allow Sikhs to wear the kirpan in school, yet expel students for bringing a Boy Scout pocket knife on accident or nail clippers. The Kirpan is a freaking dagger! "No weapons" means "no weapons." Period/ Full-stop (as you fellas across the puddle say).


Kirpans, at least those worn in schools in this country, are typically fixed permanently in the sheath.


Typically, but not always. When they are fixed (or otherwise rendered "harmless"), it isn't a big problem. The problem I have is when they aren't (reminds me of the issues they had regarding people dressed as Samurai or Anime characters playing with their swords at ComicCon). I saw on more than one occasion when people were carrying them and unsheathing them in public facilities with the "no weapons" signs posted on the doors.



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27 Oct 2012, 2:58 pm

The young lady knew Disney Company's focus on illusion before she ever applied for a job.
She knew that Disney theme parks are creating little 'worlds' to entertain the public; these parks offer a break from real life.
She had a successful interview, wherein the company's goals were outlined.
She worked there, apparently competently, for years.
SHE changed, not the company, not the rules.
Whatever religion or philosophy one chooses to follow that makes former behavior not possible, it is the individual's responsibility to find a way to live according to her new views.
There is no reason to expect any organization or individual to change long-standing rules to accommodate the (apparently) optional observances of one member of only one of hundreds of religious faiths in our world.
I am in a Taco Bell, by the way, across from the 'Umi Learning Center', a Muslim education and community center that fits in very well here. 99.9% of women and girls there wear the full-length coverings (burka?); no one around here is critical of their center, their attire, or their faith.


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Tequila
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27 Oct 2012, 6:43 pm

Sylkat wrote:
Whatever religion or philosophy one chooses to follow that makes former behavior not possible, it is the individual's responsibility to find a way to live according to her new views.


Other people must always bend to the will of Islam and Allah, not the other way round. It's a problem that's mainly found in Islam in the modern era, but isn't unheard of elsewhere. Once you start making exceptions for one religion, you start having to make special cases for all of them.

The woman wants special treatment, simple as that. I dearly hope she is told to stick her obnoxious "beliefs" where the sun don't shine, in much the same way as anyone else wanting to impose their views on others would be. She has to reconcile her beliefs with her professional role, in much the same that other people do. If she can't do that, she's in the wrong job.

Sylkat wrote:
I am in a Taco Bell, by the way, across from the 'Umi Learning Center', a Muslim education and community center that fits in very well here. 99.9% of women and girls there wear the full-length coverings (burka?); no one around here is critical of their center, their attire, or their faith.


The horrible black thing? Abaya and niqab.

Perhaps because they know full well they will get all manner of accusations, insults, threats or violence if they do? It's definitely the case here. Anything or anyone that criticises Islam or the behaviour of its adherents is 'Islamophobic' or 'nothing to do with Islam' here (yes, terrorism and mass murder is nothing to do with scripture, even when Islamist terrorists can provably quote verses in their holy book!). I loved the way that a prominent, very 'moderate' (by Islamic standards) writer and broadcaster here who poses as a modern British Asian blabity blah, etc was busy saying how western society is "Islamophobic", and how so many Britons and British society is riddled with racists (yet they still choose to live here and not the tribal craphouses they used to live in), yet made a speech in an Islamic 'cultural' centre saying: "The kaffar, the disbelievers, the atheists who remain deaf and stubborn to the teachings of Islam, the rational message of the Quran; they are described in the Quran as, quote, 'a people of no intelligence', Allah describes them as; not of no morality, not as people of no belief – people of 'no intelligence' – because they’re incapable of the intellectual effort it requires to shake off those blind prejudices, to shake off those easy assumptions about this world, about the existence of God. In this respect, the Quran describes the atheists as 'cattle', as cattle of those who grow the crops and do not stop and wonder about this world." A bit more on the chap I'm referring to here (http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/douglas-murray/2012/08/peter-hitchens-vs-mehdi-hasan/). Not that I agree with Murray's neoconservative views, but he's right on Islam.