Self diagnosis? Please chat about getting real diagnosis

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Philologos
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02 Sep 2010, 9:46 am

"At about the age of about 7, I found I could hide behind a carefully constructed mask, and be a weird, estremely egotistical kid who didn't care about what people though - essentially neurotypical. "

It took me till I was 10 before I learned to do that - I added an extra touch "occasionally crazy" - helped keep certain people away.

Given my mother I am glad diagnosis was not available in the US at the critical time. MIGHT have helped me from 15 on - but the experts my mother would have chosen to believe would have driven me down, not up.

Sympathetic and in some cases understanding teachers helped a lot, though.



ladyrain
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02 Sep 2010, 2:15 pm

I came across this article by Tony Attwood today.

http://www.reboundtherapy.org/papers/as ... ttwood.pdf


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LabPet
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02 Sep 2010, 3:33 pm

ladyrain wrote:
I came across this article by Tony Attwood today.

http://www.reboundtherapy.org/papers/as ... ttwood.pdf


Good point.....To Note: I know OP is from NZ; when I tentatively suggested OP look for a Dx via Attwood (Australia) I understand this is some distance away, but it's do-able. To note that even some Americans travel to Australia to visit the Attwood clinic. That was just a suggestion. I'm sure OP will find a place nearby and diagnostician's qualifications do matter; it's worth the travel for a trustworthy diagnostician. Really imperative to choose a reputable place/person, even if that entails travel/cost. [I've met some downright dangerous and scary neuro/psych (un)professionals - check out my sig line.]


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Claire_Louise
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03 Sep 2010, 12:44 am

Hi there,
Thanks for all your suggestions - they have all been extremely valuable.
@ *A different name* - yes, I have been through so many plates, cups, etc, that I have long since stopped counting...

I have taken the first steps towards a diagnosis, and told a trustworthy adult, who also has experience with aspergers. She has known me since my time 'before the mask' and can see that I most likely has aspergers.
Within the next couple of days, I hope to get in touch with either *autism NZ* or a nearby support group.

I would really appreciate your future advice, and also the opportunity to post my progress as I get a diagnosis.
Also, any recommended people/members that live in Auckland, or even on the North Shore, I would be greatful for contact details.

Thanks again :)



DandelionFireworks
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03 Sep 2010, 12:56 am

I would warn you to carefully consider all of the doors a diagnosis will close to you. Do you think you'll ever need services? If so, you should get diagnosed, unless you could get those services without a formal diagnosis. If you don't expect that you'll seriously need anything you would absolutely need a diagnosis for in the foreseeable future, I would hold off. There are careers you'll never be able to pursue if you're diagnosed, because the jobs just aren't open to you regardless of ability.


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Claire_Louise
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03 Sep 2010, 3:27 am

Hi, DandelionFireworks (+ others).
Yes, I do realise the impact that a diagnosis will have on my life.
I have always wanted to go on an overseas exchange with AFS, and am aware of the impact that it would have.
And of course there is the job issue *sigh*

But my main reason for getting a diagnosis is because I know that I am aspergers, and I am sick of constant belittling and weird looks. I can't change the way I am, but if I had a diagnosis, teachers would stop saying that I'm dishonest because of a lack of eye contact, and I wouldn't just be known as 'extremely eccentric.' Also, I would like to belong to a support group where I could learn better social skills... :)



Stellar
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03 Sep 2010, 3:35 am

Wait till you start having an even more active life and then rethink getting a diagnosis. Lots of cons.



peterd
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03 Sep 2010, 3:38 am

Getting the diagnosis and making your life better by doing it can't be bad.

Getting the diagnosis and making your life worse wouldn't be great. But then, life as an unknowing aspie isn't often great either.

Sounds like you're smart enough to keep things tilted towards the "good" path. I wish you well in the endeavour.



Claire_Louise
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03 Sep 2010, 3:48 am

Hi,
Stellar said:
"Wait till you start having an even more active life and then rethink getting a diagnosis."
What does it mean by an "active life?"
Thanks



LabPet
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03 Sep 2010, 7:43 am

Claire_Louise wrote:
Hi, DandelionFireworks (+ others).
Yes, I do realise the impact that a diagnosis will have on my life.
I have always wanted to go on an overseas exchange with AFS, and am aware of the impact that it would have.
And of course there is the job issue *sigh*

But my main reason for getting a diagnosis is because I know that I am aspergers, and I am sick of constant belittling and weird looks. I can't change the way I am, but if I had a diagnosis, teachers would stop saying that I'm dishonest because of a lack of eye contact, and I wouldn't just be known as 'extremely eccentric.' Also, I would like to belong to a support group where I could learn better social skills... :)


Hi Claire_Louise - You are doing really well! Please know that AS is not a limit for you, I promise. Maybe the contrary. I am a doctoral student currently & close to my PhD; I am a foreign student too! Of course any AS individual may be an overseas exchange student, if you wish. Remember you need not share your Dx with anybody; be discrete. Just work hard on your academics and goals - you'll do fine.

But do understand that having a formal Dx, that is, a formal document from a qualified professional, will not make the awkwardness go away; others will still stare, etc. The Wrong Planet is a good resource. I know all too well about being teased - - maybe if you have a Dx, with subsequent social arrangements (if you choose) you can avert this somewhat. You will have friends. Do not be discouraged. Remember that plenty of us diagnosed Aspies are PhD's, MD, artists, professors, teachers, etc. On the Wrong Planet I've met some of the smartest and kindest individuals anybody would hope to know. Good luck, Claire_Louise - you'll be just fine regardless of any formal Dx :flower:


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Claire_Louise
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04 Sep 2010, 5:08 pm

Thanks so much for everything
You guys have been so helpful and given me amazing advice