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davidsmith
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04 Sep 2010, 7:58 pm

Hi my name is David Smith and I am working on a survey with Kristen Gillespie, MA, a Psychology grad student at UCLA studying autism.
Our goal with the survey is to understand how autistics communicate online. There hasn't been much if any research on this subject especially asking for insights from autistics.
I'm reaching out to anyone who might be able to refer some more people from the autistic community so that we can get their insights.
Thank you for any help you can offer!


Participate in a study about Autism and the Internet:
Do differences in how people see the world affect how they use the Internet? Does the Internet help people make friends or learn about new things? We are conducting a survey about how people use the Internet to communicate. It is for both autistic people and people who are not autistic. If you would like to participate or have any questions, please email David Smith at [email protected]
It should take between 15 minutes and an hour to complete.
Thank you for taking our survey!



Jeyradan
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04 Sep 2010, 11:06 pm

Any way to make an online link directly to the survey?
I may be an exception here, but I know I'd be happy to participate if it didn't mean I had to send someone an e-mail explaining who I am, where I learned about the survey, and so on.



StuartN
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05 Sep 2010, 4:38 pm

Jeyradan wrote:
I may be an exception here, but I know I'd be happy to participate if it didn't mean I had to send someone an e-mail explaining who I am, where I learned about the survey, and so on.


Me too - I am not emailing [email protected] with my personal data, in response to a message from someone who has posted precisely once on this forum.

If there was a website with the name, address and telephone number of the researcher and supervisor, then I might consider responding.