How can you be happy about a diagnosis of Autism?

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Adamantus
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07 Nov 2010, 4:34 pm

Is this a chat room or a forum?



Jediscraps
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07 Nov 2010, 4:35 pm

it's a forum.



Adamantus
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07 Nov 2010, 4:39 pm

It's ok I was only joking due to the frequency of the replies. :wink:



Wallourdes
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07 Nov 2010, 4:40 pm

It's a VERY active forum :D


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Maje
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07 Nov 2010, 4:49 pm

Be happy with what you have got and dont try to be something you cant be :wink:



Moog
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07 Nov 2010, 5:26 pm

SImple, two choices.

1 be happy
2 be unhappy

I know which I prefer.


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Peko
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07 Nov 2010, 7:19 pm

Good thing about an autism diagnosis... finally getting an explanation for why you're eccentric or just freakin' weird :wink:


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glider18
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07 Nov 2010, 10:03 pm

After I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's/autism I celebrated. Why? Because I now knew why I was the way I was. I now knew what was responsible for the special intense interests that I so enjoy. I now knew why I was able to play various musical instruments with no lessons and in little time. I realized that autism was one of the things that made my life fun and interesting. I don't mind not having friends---I don't require them. I enjoy life doing things on my own (and with my family). I am enjoying life with autism.


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07 Nov 2010, 10:37 pm

I wish I would have celebrated. Right when I was diagnosed, I thought Aspergers=autism=retard. Obviously this was wrong, and I discovered that as I did the research. But now I realize that there's a name for what's different about me, and it actually makes me rather happy. Not nearly as happy as my faith in God and my friends, but happy nonetheless.



Todesking
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07 Nov 2010, 11:38 pm

For me I was relieved to find out I was not crazy just autistic. They don't lock up autistics just crazy people, at least not yet.


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Cicely
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08 Nov 2010, 1:39 am

I was relieved and happy to be diagnosed. Ultimately it doesn't change who I am, so there's no point in being upset about having a diagnosis. And learning I have Asperger's explained a lot and helped me understand myself better. Yesterday I celebrated the one year anniversary of my diagnosis, and I can't believe all of the things I've done over the past year. I wouldn't be where I am if I hadn't been diagnosed.



violetchild
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08 Nov 2010, 4:00 am

You are still you no matter what name or label is put onto you.

I had mixed feelings about my Aspie diagnoses, I knew was Aspie myself and thought I'd be relieved to get an offical diagnoses.... but I still cried when i was told. (Even thou i already knew, it was a shock to have the professionals say it).

Im fine with the diagnoses now (it was just the initial shock of hearing it), i would of been more upset had they told me it wasnt my issue as i knew it was.
...........

Will you be able to work??? i guess it all depends on if you can find something you love to do... or excel in. Us Aspies also have some advantages in life when it comes to things which interest us.



MindBlind
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08 Nov 2010, 7:52 am

Adamantus wrote:
I just found out that I have Autism, it seem very likely anyway. Everyone here seems the same as me and I can relate to what most people are saying. I just wonder what you're supposed to do once you have a diagnosis of this? I feel like I know why I failed in my previous jobs, why I can't talk to people, why I get hurt in every social encounter, and it looks like there is no cure for this. I've recently learnt EFT which is a godsend but although it allows me to feel perfectly peaceful and calm on the inside, I still wonder what I'm supposed to do for a job, and whether I can ever really relate to people. I feel bitter and really upset and I don't know what to do.


Hm, let me see....
Well, having a diagnosis got me access to therapy and support which helped me to get on with my life. A diagnosis also led me to others on the spectrum who are now my closest and dearest friends. Suprisingly, having special needs was sort of the reason why I decided to make movies because I don't think I would have tried stop motion animation if it werent for a specific organisation in my city that provide arts and crafts workshops for the disabled. However, I think the biggest reason why being aware of my diagnosis made me feel happy was because it explained why I was different and it helped me to understand myself better.

Now employment is pretty difficult to get these days (especially if you have a form of autism) and I empathise with your frustration, but being autistic doesn't neccesarily mean that you aren't going to get employment. I don't know your personal situation, but I know plenty of people from all over the spectrum who have employment. Some of them have very good, well paying, full-time employment. One of my best friends is so well off at the moment that he's planning on moving to South Africa (and he's what you might call an aspie stereotype). I don't know what advice to give you as I volunteer (it's difficult to find a paying job where I come from and I'm a student) but I think there's some resources on employment and autism on this website.

As for relating to people, I understand what you mean, but I think you need to take a step back and look at the whole spectrum of the human condition. Everyone feels this way. All of us feel insignificant, pathetic, stupid, lonely and powerless. It's just part of being human. I hope you can take some comfort in the fact that at least in that respect, you relate to everyone o the planet. However, I'm willing to bet that you do in fact relate to people a lot better than you realise. I'm sure you have similar priorities, ambitions, interests and ersonality to most people. And even if you could legitimately be called "abnormal", that's not always a bad thing.