Page 1 of 1 [ 7 posts ] 

pgd
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Jul 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,624

16 Nov 2010, 11:23 am

What does the word Lord mean as in the term: the Lord God?

(from the Bible)

---

Words

Landlord
Lessee

Lord of the Rings (novel)



Vince
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Dec 2007
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 703
Location: Sweden

16 Nov 2010, 12:04 pm

Not sure if there's a precise definition, but generally it seems that a lord is someone who lords over something. Someone who is in command of something.
In the case of the Lord of the Rings, it's the "one ring to rule them all and in the darkness bind them". Presumably this means it commands all the other rings.
In the case of a landlord, presumably it means that he is in command of a bit of land. He decides who gets to live there.


_________________
I'm Vince. I make the music. And puppet.
http://www.swenglish.nu


Philologos
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Age: 76
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,985

16 Nov 2010, 1:37 pm

One of my colleagues told this stoty against himself:

A = colleague is teaching Ruritanian, 60s format with "native speaker" resource present. B = former student now high academic guru is taking class. C = other student asks, "what does [Lord] mean?"

A, not familiar with the word, picks up dictionary to research.

B pipes up - "why not just ask hi,?" Points to "native" resource.

Way to go, Paul.



Chevand
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jul 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 581
Location: Vancouver, BC

16 Nov 2010, 2:17 pm

From Wikipedia:

Quote:
Lord is a title with various meanings. It can denote a prince or a feudal superior (especially a feudal tenant who holds directly from the king, i.e., a baron). The title today is mostly used in connection with the peerage of the United Kingdom or its predecessor countries, although some users of the title do not themselves hold peerages, and use it 'by courtesy'. The title may also be used in conjunction with others to denote a superior holder of an otherwise generic title, in such combinations as "Lord Mayor" or "Lord Chief Justice". The title is primarily taken by men, while women will usually take the title 'lady'. However, this is not universal, as the Lord of Mann and female Lord Mayors are examples of women who are styled 'lord'.

In religious contexts Lord can also refer to various different gods or deities. The earliest uses of Lord in the English language in a religious context were by English Bible translators such as Bede. This reflected the Jewish practice of substituting the spoken Hebrew word 'Adonai' (which means 'My Lord') for YHWH when read aloud.

According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word 'hlāford' which originated from 'hlāfweard' meaning 'bread keeper' or 'loaf-ward', reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers.



ruveyn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Sep 2008
Age: 83
Gender: Male
Posts: 31,726
Location: New Jersey

16 Nov 2010, 4:22 pm

It means Boss.

ruveyn



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,727
Location: temperate zone

16 Nov 2010, 4:26 pm

It goes back to dark age fuedalism.

Peasants were serfs tied to the land.

The land was owned by the nobleman who lived in the castle.
So peasants were tied to their local feudal lord.
Serfs were not quite owned as slaves but were nonetheless ruled by him in the fuedla hierarchy.

Thus peasants owed fealty to their lord.

You expressed fealty to you superiours in the fuedal hierarchy by kneeling and clasping your hands together -finger tips to finger tips - pointed to the person whose superiority your are acknowledging- with your face down.

By analogy God became our "Lord", and expressing fealty to this lord was expressed through the same hand gesture- the gesture we now associate with prayer.



Pistonhead
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Jun 2010
Age: 29
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,732
Location: Bradenton, Florida

16 Nov 2010, 4:26 pm

Means total badass. :lol:


_________________
"Some ideals are worth dying for"
==tOGoWPO==