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Did your performance on this working memory test quickly improve?
I credit the improvement (greater than 20%) to a sensory adaptation beyond visualization. 15%  15%  [ 2 ]
I credit the improvement to motivation from seeing my low score; this increased my focus. 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
I credit the improvement to adaptation and an increase in focus. 31%  31%  [ 4 ]
I don't know why I improved so much. 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
I did great the first time I tried the test (80% and above). 23%  23%  [ 3 ]
I scored below 40% and could not improve the score more than 20%. 15%  15%  [ 2 ]
Total votes : 13

aghogday
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24 Dec 2010, 1:40 am

After you click continue anonymously your score is the first won on the list of others who have taking the test. Most of them do it anonymously instead of registering a name.



DandelionFireworks
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24 Dec 2010, 1:52 pm

Thank you.

The results from my third trial are 81.25% correct, average time 598.63 ms (what does that mean?) and "combined" (huh?) is 736.77.

My trick is to name the object in my head. "Car, fish, heart, fish-- click-- heart-- click-- boot, car, cat..."

Results from trial four: 66.67% I think it's because of all the sequences that go X, Y, X, X. I always click the last X. Invariably.

From trial five: 86.67

73.33

93.33

100

80


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aghogday
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24 Dec 2010, 2:19 pm

Quote:
The results from my third trial are 81.25% correct, average time 598.63 ms (what does that mean?) and "combined" (huh?) is 736.77.


598.63 is the average time in milliseconds between each of your clicks. 736.77 is the average time 598.63 divided by the the percent correct .8125 =736.77

The faster you click and the greater percentage you get correct, the lower your overall combined score is.



Jediscraps
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24 Dec 2010, 2:31 pm

My average correct from 6 plays is 65.23.

My average time out of those six plays is 902.92 ms.

After I understood the game I'm not sure I did any better after that. If I kept on doing it I might get better like one would with a video game, maybe.



ToughDiamond
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24 Dec 2010, 2:44 pm

60% first time, 85.71% second time.

I noticed a similar improvement in a test I designed myself, in which I had to repeat a string of digits in reverse order.

I don't really know why I seem to improve so much....though it's possibly nothing more remarkable than the old adage "practice makes perfect." I suspect that it's to do with the way it takes me time to focus on anything new - with familiarity I usually get better. One thing I always do with such memory tests is to speak the names of the items out loud. I suspect, but haven't proved, that my auditory memory is better than my "imagination" memory, if that makes any sense. Music is a big special interest with me, so I guess my awareness of sounds is unusually well-developed.

One variable in working-memory tests is the number of interfering elements between the point in time when the subject is shown the target, and the point when the response is required. I see this test only has one interfering element. But it's enough to make it difficult, at least for me.

I sure don't rate my working memory as particularly good, in fact I think a lot of the anxiety I get at work is down to my noticing that a request from my employer might get forgotten because of interference from all the other things he wants me to do.



aghogday
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24 Dec 2010, 4:36 pm

Quote:
sure don't rate my working memory as particularly good, in fact I think a lot of the anxiety I get at work is down to my noticing that a request from my employer might get forgotten because of interference from all the other things he wants me to do.


I took notes at work just like school. Not only did it remind me of everything I had to do but it also helped me focus while I was taking the notes. Kind of the same way that saying the words of the pictures in the short term memory test help me focus. I would of had horrible anxiety without the notebook, the times I misplaced it were quite anxiety provoking, fortunately I never lost one. I probably should of used a notebook at home as well; my family would of been happier.



ToughDiamond
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25 Dec 2010, 6:53 am

aghogday wrote:
I took notes at work just like school. Not only did it remind me of everything I had to do but it also helped me focus while I was taking the notes. Kind of the same way that saying the words of the pictures in the short term memory test help me focus. I would of had horrible anxiety without the notebook, the times I misplaced it were quite anxiety provoking, fortunately I never lost one. I probably should of used a notebook at home as well; my family would of been happier.

Good idea....unfortunately, for some weird reason I get into a mess with "to-do" lists. :( I'm fine with shopping lists because they're relatively simple. With the kind of work I do (research), the nature of my tasks often varies after the fact, depending on how circumstances unfold. So I had to fall back on the "dynamic" properties of human memory, precarious though it was. Nor could I use both methods simultaneously - once I make a list, I kind of lock onto it and become its slave rather than its master.

Did the test a third time last night.....got 100% 8) One thing that may have helped was that I quit while I was ahead (as soon as the "results available" thing came up). I'm sure I couldn't have continued much longer without making a mistake.