I need advice - could be in huge trouble (long read)

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Todesking
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09 Feb 2011, 12:06 pm

Millstone wrote:
Since it hasn't been posted yet on this page, don't talk to the police


In America the cops are allowed to lie to you to get a confession. There have been several high profile cases where the police have railroaded mentally ill people into confessions. Get your lawyer to play this up as what the cops and co-conspirators are doing to you.


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Cornflake
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09 Feb 2011, 12:49 pm

OP is in the UK, so most of what's been posted from an American viewpoint won't apply.
Including, unfortunately, Todesking's suggestions about informing the authorities of the autism aspect.
To put it bluntly, I doubt very much whether they'll give a flying s**t about that - or it they do, nothing will be done to handle it for months and what may eventually get done will be ineffective anyway.

The USA has a considerably more enlightened approach in this aspect than the UK.
Despite all the legal safeguards and pre-trial possibilities here, once someone's inside that's pretty much it. Any legal redress of a possible mistrial or obtaining realistic "special needs" type of support is an uphill struggle, which is why it's essential the defence makes as much of the AS aspect as possible so any sort of custodial sentence is avoided completely.

The wheels of justice grind exceedingly slowly, and never more so than here. :roll:


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2ukenkerl
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09 Feb 2011, 9:31 pm

Chama wrote:
I think the most important point in what happened is that she was told to knock on the door and DID NOT KNOW why. Yes, she was drunk, and that has to be considered. But, if I put myself into a situation where I was with someone and was NOT drunk and they told me to knock on a door, I have a hard time saying no to people when there seem to be no harm in the action.


Well, the fact that the person felt "she would leave [him]", and the profile says male, seems to indicate the original poster is male.

Chama wrote:
And for someone with AS who usually has trouble knowing another person's intentions or even considering them, it won't seem like a big deal to just knock on a door. And if it were me, I would maybe want to ask why, but not want to be difficult so I would just do it. There are many things I do without knowing why, when someone directs me to do it, if it seems like it does not matter why (Such as asking me to set an item somewhere strange where I feel that it does not belong, but I will do it anyway because I think that it doesn't matter, there is no harm in setting it here even though I find it strange.)


Throw agoraphobia, stranger, out of way, etc... in to the mix, and everything you and the OP said sounds like garbage!

Chama wrote:
If AS is taken into account properly, then it could be shown that knocking on the door should not make her an accomplice because those with AS often do not know the intentions of others and just being asked to knock on a door seems completely harmless, anyway.


You go out of your way, and lie, based on nothing?

Chama wrote:
You had no idea he was going to break in, you had no intention of breaking in, you did not help once it happened, and I'm sure you were scared. What a fast change of events.


It wasn't fast at all.

Chama wrote:
Was a blood-alcohol level test done in a timely manner? That seems like it's really important information, because how much alcohol was in your system could directly relate to how you are judged, even considering AS.


Frankly, as far as I am concerned, a high alcohol level would be damning. I mean HOW did he get the alcohol and why? What? He had it delivered to his home and just had at it? NOPE! As he said, he went to a bar. He didn't have the bar in his home. So if he lied there, how is anything else to be believed?



2ukenkerl
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09 Feb 2011, 9:43 pm

Cornflake wrote:
Puppygnu wrote:
1. Did you cross the threshold of the home? If yes, then you were trespassing.
2. Did you make physical contact of any sort with the persons in the house? If yes, then this is assault.
While these may be technically correct, let's not shoot down any remaining defence, shall we? :wink:
The defence lawyer should know how to present information showing that the intent wasn't present which would, I hope, sway any verdict to innocent.


WHY believe senseless hearsay that makes NO sense and fits NOTHING when the defendant is ALSO saying something that makes sense that EVERYONE can agree with that DOES may sense? Any person with AS should be able to believe it. Suppose a person was standing in front of me, and it rained. I was soaking wet, my convertible was FILLED with water, etc... And I told you that I NEVER saw rain, I would NEVER go out when it was raining, and I have never seen it raining and I went outside and water fell from the sky and I am not responsible for my car being wet.

Wouldn't a lawyer be able to say I saw rain, I went out when it was raining, and my going out was why my convertible got wet. There was a witness, it rained, and the weater agencies can confirm it.

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3. Your story seems implausible to me. I can not imagine a person with agoraphobia and autism getting drunk and lying about being an insurance sales person.


Frankly, I AGREE!



2ukenkerl
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09 Feb 2011, 9:54 pm

Cornflake wrote:
OP is in the UK, so most of what's been posted from an American viewpoint won't apply.
Including, unfortunately, Todesking's suggestions about informing the authorities of the autism aspect.
To put it bluntly, I doubt very much whether they'll give a flying sh** about that - or it they do, nothing will be done to handle it for months and what may eventually get done will be ineffective anyway.

The USA has a considerably more enlightened approach in this aspect than the UK.
Despite all the legal safeguards and pre-trial possibilities here, once someone's inside that's pretty much it. Any legal redress of a possible mistrial or obtaining realistic "special needs" type of support is an uphill struggle, which is why it's essential the defence makes as much of the AS aspect as possible so any sort of custodial sentence is avoided completely.

The wheels of justice grind exceedingly slowly, and never more so than here. :roll:


Don't hold the US so high. In the US, it is WIERD! It is evolution in reverse. They will convict a person out of a just crime of passion, and let a dangerous psychopath go. Things can be SLOW here! Some people are getting convicted or set free on genetic evidence after DECADES! And the AS garbage that is going on now in the US courts can only HURT in the long run.

Ever see "law and order"? A lot of the BAD stuff there really DOES happen.



Cornflake
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10 Feb 2011, 11:52 am

2ukenkerl wrote:
Don't hold the US so high. In the US, it is WIERD! It is evolution in reverse. They will convict a person out of a just crime of passion, and let a dangerous psychopath go.
:lol: Oh yeah, I know. Lots of cases cases get messed up horribly, one way or another.
But I really just meant that the situation WRT Autism (in whatever form), people generally have many more resources available to them and it is much better handled than here in the UK.


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