I have a high pain tolerance, no one believes me

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kat_ross
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22 Feb 2011, 3:56 am

I have a very high pain tolerance as well. I remember when I went to get my tattoo, the tattoo artist seemed kind of worried, and he even asked me what I had eaten for lunch that day (like he thought it would hurt so much I would get sick!). But I didn't even flinch once.

Don't worry whether or not anyone believes you :)



sartresue
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22 Feb 2011, 4:18 pm

My O-Pain-ion topic

Tolerating intense pain is not difficult if you try to focus on something else. I have been able to do this since I was a child. Crying out did not help.

I have given birth to three children naturally. with very little pain med. I found if I was quiet and breathed regularly, I could tolerate the intense pain. I also knew the pain would not be permanent. I knew the same applied to headaches--the longest I ever suffered was 62 hours.

Pain can be a good thing as it warns us something is not right, and intervention might be needed.


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SteelMaiden
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22 Feb 2011, 4:22 pm

I have a high pain tolerance and have AS. I doubt people tell by looks, but then I know nothing about looks because I have next to zero ability to read facial expressions. Once I tore my muscle badly in a skiing accident and I ended up pretending I was in a lot of pain just so they would treat me for it, because it just felt like I had pulled it a bit, but the physiotherapist said it was torn.


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Arminius
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22 Feb 2011, 5:33 pm

I do, too. It comes in handy whether people believe one has it or not.



IMCarnochan
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22 Feb 2011, 6:35 pm

kat_ross wrote:
I have a very high pain tolerance as well. I remember when I went to get my tattoo, the tattoo artist seemed kind of worried, and he even asked me what I had eaten for lunch that day (like he thought it would hurt so much I would get sick!). But I didn't even flinch once.


If they are doing shade/color work you can let them know you have a high tolerance for pain and some artists will do the work quicker. The ink acts as a lubricant and so they dip more often to make it hurt less, but if they can work until the needle is dry they can have more needle to skin contact and less pot to skin time.



IMCarnochan
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22 Feb 2011, 6:41 pm

ocdgirl123 wrote:
I also have anxiety.


Then I want to go on record as saying that I believe that you have a high pain tolerance.



ocdgirl123
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22 Feb 2011, 7:45 pm

IMCarnochan wrote:
ocdgirl123 wrote:
I also have anxiety.


Then I want to go on record as saying that I believe that you have a high pain tolerance.


How does anxiety mean "low pain tolerance"?


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Last edited by ocdgirl123 on 22 Feb 2011, 7:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

ocdgirl123
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22 Feb 2011, 7:46 pm

missykrissy wrote:
BlueMage wrote:
They probably don't want to talk to you because they are caught off guard by the strong reaction you have to the topic being brought up or discussed.


i would have to second you last thought there.

i also don't understand why it would be so important to you that people know you have a high pain tolerance or the point of arguing over it. maybe it's not that they don't care but that it doesn't matter to them because it's not a topic of interest or importance. actually, it seems kind of an odd thing to bring up unless you were getting a tattoo or something. Also, i'm not sure why you would expect them to treat you differently because of your pain tolerance but i do understand that if you got upset or kept bringing it up how that may put people off.

i also find that pain tolerance can change over time. i find mine has gone up incredibly after having my children and especially since i did deliver them all natural(without pain killers or epidural.) i think that how we feel pain is relative in a way to other pain we have been through in the past. for example, at 11 i got my ears peirced. at that point it was the most painful thing i'd ever felt and i would probably have rated it a 9/10 where as my more rescent peircings i would have rated a 2 /10 and would rate delivering a 9 lbs baby a 9/10.

either way, i would not put much thought into what people think of your pain tolerance levels. i highly doubt that they think you are crazy because of it unless you are using it to do stunts or other things that could cause damage to yourself. they are likely reacting more to your own reaction to the topic so perhaps this is a chance for you to become more aware of your own behaviour in the situation.


I just don't want people being sympathetic to me. I'm kind of funny this way. If I have a falling out with a friend, I want people to be sympathetic to me, but if I fall off my bike, I don't want people being sympathetic to me. I'm embarrassed of pain.


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22 Feb 2011, 11:29 pm

Xeno wrote:
As for just how severe my headaches get, well... a few years ago I was hospitalized for a potentially deadly stomach infection called C. diff (which was completely unrelated, of course). My stomach was in the worst pain it had ever been. I was given morphine, enough to kill all the pain in my stomach, and even then, the pain in my head wouldn't completely go away.

I found that Morphine does almost nothing for a headache, I was in the Hospital for a burn to my hand and on Morphine and developed a brain-buster from lack of sleep, hospitals and sleep don't go together. Anyways I finally had to ask the Nurse to get a script for Tylenol to get rid of the headache that the Morphine wasn't touching. I seem to have a pretty high pain tolerance too, I remember looking at my hand, with the flames a foot high and thinking "Wow, I'm not screaming like a schoolgirl".


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Dillonski
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24 Feb 2011, 11:16 am

I have high pain threshold alwell.



draelynn
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24 Feb 2011, 11:29 am

Me and pain are always at odds. I believe I'm an Aspie, I have fibromyalgia and I'm also a redhead. All three of these things can confer 'altered' pain sensations. Light touches or things like a slap on the shoulder or a poke can send spasms of pain through every nerve but real internal pain I have a very high tolerance for. And like alot of others on the spectrum, I have an affinity for body pressure - not just a hug but near crushing pressure. So, most people think I'm a wimp because I bellyache over an affectionate grasp of my shoulder but a deep slash that requires stitches and I don't even blink twice. Not all pain is the same and all people have their own reactions to it - some learned, some inate.

ocdgirl - it's just a difference. Why do other's opinion of it bother you so much?



DavidForthoffer
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10 Jan 2012, 11:43 pm

A connection between autism and pain tolerance is interesting.

Although I don't have autism, a particularly traumatic event as a 3-year-old plunged me into an autistic-like state that I didn't start coming out of for twenty years. After another twenty years, it is behind me.

Somewhere along the way, I have developed an extremely high tolerance for pain, even though I can still feel more-or-less normally. I cannot imagine an injury that would cause intolerable pain, though some might cause enough pain to be diverting enough to not sleep normally.

For example, I was once playing substitute goalie in indoor competitve soccer. An opponent kicked a rocket ball high in a corner. I leaped for it, stretching my fingers and thumbs wide and stiff as I could. The ball blasted past my left palm, on my thumb side. It instantly snapped my thumb back, then let it snap back in place. I kept playing, not particularly feeling anything. After a few minutes, I noticed blood dripping down, and realized the ball had ripped the skin apart between my thumb and palm, on the palm side. I later went to a doctor, who stitched it up, without anaesthesia. At least I learned why pro goalies wear gloves!



Last edited by DavidForthoffer on 11 Jan 2012, 1:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

glider18
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11 Jan 2012, 1:08 pm

Hi DavidForthoffer and welcome to the WrongPlanet. I read about your sports injury and it reminded me of something that happened to me once. I was playing basketball (a sport I don't like to play and was never good at it) when I sprained my ankle on a sweaty tile gym floor. I didn't experience any pain. All I felt was a strange heavy feel on the side of my ankle. When I looked down, it was swollen severely. During the entire duration of my recovery I experienced no pain. But most people with this type of sprain experience a lot of pain.

kat_ross wrote:
I have a very high pain tolerance as well. I remember when I went to get my tattoo, the tattoo artist seemed kind of worried, and he even asked me what I had eaten for lunch that day (like he thought it would hurt so much I would get sick!). But I didn't even flinch once...


Since I have several tattoos, tattoo artists have commented on me just sitting/lying there not reacting. After having heard that several times, I decided to see what I really looked like during what is considered to be a very painful tattoo (on the mid-chest/sternum), so I had it videotaped. And...I just lay there with no expression, and if you were to only see my face, you would think I was just reclining on the sofa in the comfort of my family room.


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izzeme
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11 Jan 2012, 2:39 pm

as a matter of fact, it used to be the other way around for me for a long time.
i too have a high physical pain tolerance, and i just assumed that my reference frame was the norm, so every time people commented on knocking their head or cutting themselves while cooking, or commenting on my lack of reaction on the same happening to me, were exaggerating...

it is a normal human thing to judge abilities to your own reference and experience; if you look like something they have seen before, they assume you 'work' simularly



jpr11011
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11 Jan 2012, 5:11 pm

I agree. I think some people may be put off by how strong you come off when you say that.

I have a high pain tolerance too. I have really bad IBS, but I've never missed a day of school from it, even when the pain is easily a 7/10 (muscles compressing nerves). I have a low pain tolerance for squeezing pain, though, like when I pluck eyebrows.



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11 Jan 2012, 6:52 pm

missykrissy wrote:
BlueMage wrote:
They probably don't want to talk to you because they are caught off guard by the strong reaction you have to the topic being brought up or discussed.


i would have to second you last thought there.

i also don't understand why it would be so important to you that people know you have a high pain tolerance or the point of arguing over it. maybe it's not that they don't care but that it doesn't matter to them because it's not a topic of interest or importance. actually, it seems kind of an odd thing to bring up unless you were getting a tattoo or something. Also, i'm not sure why you would expect them to treat you differently because of your pain tolerance but i do understand that if you got upset or kept bringing it up how that may put people off.

i also find that pain tolerance can change over time. i find mine has gone up incredibly after having my children and especially since i did deliver them all natural(without pain killers or epidural.) i think that how we feel pain is relative in a way to other pain we have been through in the past. for example, at 11 i got my ears peirced. at that point it was the most painful thing i'd ever felt and i would probably have rated it a 9/10 where as my more rescent peircings i would have rated a 2 /10 and would rate delivering a 9 lbs baby a 9/10.

either way, i would not put much thought into what people think of your pain tolerance levels. i highly doubt that they think you are crazy because of it unless you are using it to do stunts or other things that could cause damage to yourself. they are likely reacting more to your own reaction to the topic so perhaps this is a chance for you to become more aware of your own behaviour in the situation.


This, and

Generally women have a higher pain tolerance than men. I have a higher pain tolerance than anyone else I've come across. I've never understood the point in freaking out with pain, it hurts I see it, and it ain't broken no biggie. You're gonna have to get over trying to prove yourself to others if you have any type of disability. I gave up on everyone when I was a kid. I don't get why it's so important to prove this.