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sartresue
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19 Mar 2011, 9:39 pm

A bright shiny thing topic

Very loony. Last saw such a one 19 years ago. glad to see it come back. :mrgreen:

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20 ... on-110319/


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ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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19 Mar 2011, 10:16 pm

It's tonight, right? I need to go outside and take a look at it!



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19 Mar 2011, 10:24 pm

I saw it. It's very bright, indeed 8O
I just wish there were less clouds out there. I had to wait until clouds passed to see it again.



sartresue
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19 Mar 2011, 10:56 pm

Lasting longer with a photo topic

Just got some pics with my son's super deeduper high tech digital camera. :D

The sky is the clearest black in ages. Aspie bright is the moon up there!! 8)

Just in time for Spring!! :P


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19 Mar 2011, 11:18 pm

My mum said it was the closest the moon had been to our earth for a hundred years...it was big, red and foreboding, lol. Majora's Mask, anyone? :P



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20 Mar 2011, 6:02 pm

Majora's mask is an awesome game. :)

Ocarina of time was better though.


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20 Mar 2011, 7:53 pm

News made a big deal about it, but was pretty unimpressive.


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20 Mar 2011, 8:05 pm

We're going to have a super moon? Goodie, that means I'll be the Super werewolf!
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!! !! !! !! !

-Bill, otherwise known as Kraichgauer



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20 Mar 2011, 10:07 pm

The news makes a big deal over anything these days. The only worse type of hyped up news has to be "celebrity scandals"


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22 Mar 2011, 1:00 am

SakeGirl wrote:
My mum said it was the closest the moon had been to our earth for a hundred years...it was big, red and foreboding, lol. Majora's Mask, anyone? :P


LOL my thoughts exactly.

On a more serious, but not quite unrelated note, is it possible that the moon's proximity to Earth this year may have been a factor in the Japan quake? I'm not saying it's the only factor, but it strikes me as too much of a coincidence that the quake happened within a week of the moon passing within it's closest proximity to Earth. After all, objects with large gravitational fields tend to have a significant effect on tectonic plate movement.

It's possible that seismic pressure may have built up in the area where the quake occured over the past X years, and the gravitational flux caused by the moon passing so close to Earth may have triggered the release of said pressure, causing the earthquake.

It's just a theory I've been harboring.


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22 Mar 2011, 2:10 am

Roxas_XIII wrote:
It's just a theory I've been harboring.


It's not just possible but also likely.

I missed it. Great. :/ And I who have a 70-300mm lens and very good digital system camera. Meh.... -_-;



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22 Mar 2011, 8:11 am

Roxas_XIII wrote:
SakeGirl wrote:
My mum said it was the closest the moon had been to our earth for a hundred years...it was big, red and foreboding, lol. Majora's Mask, anyone? :P


LOL my thoughts exactly.

On a more serious, but not quite unrelated note, is it possible that the moon's proximity to Earth this year may have been a factor in the Japan quake? I'm not saying it's the only factor, but it strikes me as too much of a coincidence that the quake happened within a week of the moon passing within it's closest proximity to Earth. After all, objects with large gravitational fields tend to have a significant effect on tectonic plate movement.

It's possible that seismic pressure may have built up in the area where the quake occured over the past X years, and the gravitational flux caused by the moon passing so close to Earth may have triggered the release of said pressure, causing the earthquake.

It's just a theory I've been harboring.


Your theory is wrong. The earthquake was caused by the collision and grinding of tectonic plates which is what causes most earth quakes. The remainder are caused by volcanic eruptions.

The difference in tidal forces on the moon and earth were barely measurable. The eccentricity of the moons orbit is very small.

ruveyn



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23 Mar 2011, 10:07 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Your theory is wrong. The earthquake was caused by the collision and grinding of tectonic plates which is what causes most earth quakes. The remainder are caused by volcanic eruptions.

The difference in tidal forces on the moon and earth were barely measurable. The eccentricity of the moons orbit is very small.

ruveyn


I didn't notice him questioning that the earthquake was caused by the collision and grinding of tectonic plates. I think he meant that the increased gravitational pull of the moon may have helped in triggering the earthquake, that would've happened, with time, regardless of the moon's position.

Allegedly, an earthquake already has been triggered from the weight of a constructed dam, in China, in the not very distant past. If this indeed is correct, why could it then not be triggered by the moon's gravitation? I'd personally say it sounds rather feasible, but if it already, quite plainly, can be proven wrong, then I would find seeing that evidence to be enlightening.



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24 Mar 2011, 3:11 am

Beauty_pact wrote:
ruveyn wrote:
Your theory is wrong. The earthquake was caused by the collision and grinding of tectonic plates which is what causes most earth quakes. The remainder are caused by volcanic eruptions.

The difference in tidal forces on the moon and earth were barely measurable. The eccentricity of the moons orbit is very small.

ruveyn


I didn't notice him questioning that the earthquake was caused by the collision and grinding of tectonic plates. I think he meant that the increased gravitational pull of the moon may have helped in triggering the earthquake, that would've happened, with time, regardless of the moon's position.

.


Tidal effects are an inevitable consequence of gravitation. In times past the moon was much closer to earth than it is new. The moon is moving away from earth at about an inch a year. That is do the slowing of the earth due to tidal friction and the conservation of angular momentum. There is not a thing we can do about it.

ruveyn



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24 Mar 2011, 5:50 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Tidal effects are an inevitable consequence of gravitation. In times past the moon was much closer to earth than it is new. The moon is moving away from earth at about an inch a year. That is do the slowing of the earth due to tidal friction and the conservation of angular momentum. There is not a thing we can do about it.

ruveyn


Of course it's an inevitable consequence, and I'm aware that the moon is moving away from Earth, so yeah, it was indeed very much closer in the distant past. However, the closeness of it in the distant past affected the Earth very significantly in regards to earthquakes, as well, so I'm not sure what you're trying to say...



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25 Mar 2011, 5:26 pm

PatrickNeville wrote:
The news makes a big deal over anything these days. The only worse type of hyped up news has to be "celebrity scandals"



Moon Rise and Shine topic

Hey, that supermoon was just super. I look forward to the next one in 19 years. 8)


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