Reasons/Benefits of dating Aspies and other HFAs

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nick007
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14 Apr 2011, 3:24 pm

HopeGrows wrote:
So, if you want to try to have people understand that dating someone on the spectrum isn't a big deal, why don't you try to persuade your audience that they should evaluate people based on their character, rather than their diagnosis? Because you can find wonderful partners - who happen to be Aspie - if you're open to dating an Aspie. Just because there is no etiology between Asperger's and the characteristics of a good mate doesn't mean they're mutually exclusive either: a good mate can be Aspie; a bad mate can be Aspie. I hope the message you get across to your audience is that Asperger's doesn't define a person as a good mate, and it doesn't disqualify them from being a good mate, either.

Sounds like a good idea but I think society cares to much about labels to be perceptive of it.


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Northeastern292
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21 Apr 2011, 8:33 am

nick007 wrote:
HopeGrows wrote:
So, if you want to try to have people understand that dating someone on the spectrum isn't a big deal, why don't you try to persuade your audience that they should evaluate people based on their character, rather than their diagnosis? Because you can find wonderful partners - who happen to be Aspie - if you're open to dating an Aspie. Just because there is no etiology between Asperger's and the characteristics of a good mate doesn't mean they're mutually exclusive either: a good mate can be Aspie; a bad mate can be Aspie. I hope the message you get across to your audience is that Asperger's doesn't define a person as a good mate, and it doesn't disqualify them from being a good mate, either.

Sounds like a good idea but I think society cares to much about labels to be perceptive of it.


I'd have to agree with you. But I also did want to get across the general point:

HopeGrows wrote:
Asperger's doesn't define a person as a good mate, and it doesn't disqualify them from being a good mate, either.