Page 3 of 3 [ 35 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

JWS
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 14 Apr 2011
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 453
Location: The mountains of eastern Kentucky

12 May 2011, 9:50 pm

swbluto, I KNOW I have Aspergers, but I have been safely driving for years, now.
I got my first permit at 16, got my license at 19, and have had a good driving record ever since. I believe I'm a better driver than most NTs out there! :lol:


_________________
An Asperger's man who has Autism Spectrum Disorder level 1- mild, with a sprinkling of Synesthesia. :-)


swbluto
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2011
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,899
Location: In the Andes, counting the stars and wondering if one of them is home to another civilization

13 May 2011, 12:24 am

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
swbluto wrote:
Conspicuous and another member on another site said that they highly suspected my possession of autism from my language properties, but I was looking through the "What I can't do due to autism" thread and it seemed there were a few common actions that didn't apply to me.

And one of them was that I could definitely drive. Actually, I'm pretty sure my driving is better than 70% of America (In terms of quickness, precision and agility), if only I weren't so cautious.

Does this mean I don't have autism? Or could it be that I could have autism but my high Performance IQ enables me to drive?

Or is it possible that autistic "social communication deficits" and autistic "physical precision"/"gracefulness" are two separate domains of autism and there isn't a tight association between the two?
For now, as to understanding my language abnormalities (And the subsequent impact on social interaction), I'm leaning towards the possibility of a language disorder, maybe schizotypy in origin. I wonder what the similarities and differences between autism and language disorders are?


You know what, SW? My reflexes are super quick when I am driving! It is so weird, it's like I have this special ability with my kinetic memory or something and I can react really swiftly which explains why my driving record is so good. I never get into wrecks. I react to potential hazardous situations with such adeptness, I stop wrecks before they happen.
I might be so mild that it doesn't affect my driving because many with autism don't drive.


I hate to bolster my position as the local un-diagnosing troll, but I have to say that you seem to be on the more "mild" side of the autistic spectrum judging from your employment, driving ability, typical introvertive perspective and fairly normal language patterns. But, it could also be that those with AS with high performance IQs or processing speeds or some such could compensate well enough to mask the AS-related difficulties, or make them "easier" than the typical difficulties for your average everyday person, or better-skilled than average. If I have AS (I actually think I'm more along the lines of schizo*, if anything), then that might explain why I excel in reflex ability.

I was also the local Mario Bros. champ when I was 5 (Where you had to time jumps and movement perfectly to avoid getting hit by bullets or whatever.), so my reflexes are probably pretty good. Plus, I can balance a foamy cylinder exercise thingy on my finger better than anyone I know! lol

Yeah, so I'm kind of wondering. Were/Are you good at video games?

And, for everyone else who finds driving difficult, how do you do at side-scrolling video games (or any video games that require quick reflexes) like Super Mario Bros.? I'm wondering if the 'motor skills' and reflexes needed for driving are the same needed to play quick-reflexes-required video games well. It seems there's a preference for Strategy and RPG games among aspies, and I wonder if that preference might be influenced by reflex ability as they typically don't require quick reflexes (Like Side-Scrollers).



swbluto
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2011
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,899
Location: In the Andes, counting the stars and wondering if one of them is home to another civilization

13 May 2011, 12:46 am

Verdandi wrote:
There's no one trait that can rule out or confirm autism. There is no single acid test. If there were, diagnosis would be a simple matter. As it stands, it's not quite that simple. Nothing you can ask here will tell you yes or no.


That makes sense, since I get the impression autism is such a variegated animal, where there are many possible 'autistic attributes' one may have or not have, ranging from various elements of social skills (Empathy, Theory of Mind, Expressivity, Tonality, etc.) to sensory issues to coordination issues to sensitivities to a whole gamut of things. I wonder (Wooo... I wonder if "I wonder" would qualify as a phrase that's symptomatic of my potentially stereotyped language usage?) if there's a set of questions that could adequately represent autistic difficulties and sensitivities such that one could definitely rule out autism (Since 'one question' doesn't work, maybe a set of questions would work better?)? I know there's the AQ test, but there's something far more appealing about seemingly more-objective concrete questions like "Can you drive?" that relate to actual impairments rather than associated autistic behaviors/thinking (And actual impairments are ultimately what's important in determining ones level of functioning in various domains, no? The 'aspergers' label seems too easy to stereotype and doesn't seem to adequately describe the actual real life issues an individual experiences, prima facie.).



Last edited by swbluto on 13 May 2011, 1:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 18 Jun 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 13,399

13 May 2011, 12:50 am

swbluto wrote:
I hate to bolster my position as the local un-diagnosing troll, but I have to say that you seem to be on the more "mild" side of the autistic spectrum judging from your employment, driving ability, typical introvertive perspective and fairly normal language patterns. But, it could also be that those with AS with high performance IQs or processing speeds or some such could compensate well enough to mask the AS-related difficulties, or make them "easier" than the typical difficulties for your average everyday person, or better-skilled than average. If I have AS (I actually think I'm more along the lines of schizo*, if anything), then that might explain why I excel in reflex ability.

I am on the mild side! I can drive, but I don't have a job. I have many difficulties, it's just that driving isn't one of them. I ha extensive evaluations throughout childhood making sure I was developing properly but was never told I was autistic, just HD. Later, I found out I am mildly autistic, but my mom thought I would outgrow it, so she didn't make a big deal out of it. She thought I was cognitively advantaged and that would be enough to catapult me into enormous success.

Quote:
I was also the local Mario Bros. champ when I was 5 (Where you had to time jumps and movement perfectly to avoid getting hit by bullets or whatever.), so my reflexes are probably pretty good. Plus, I can balance a foamy cylinder exercise thingy on my finger better than anyone I know! lol

Yeah, so I'm kind of wondering. Were/Are you good at video games?

Concerning video games, I am a meager mediocre but one thing I have loads of talent for and excell exceedingly at is cryptograms. I can do them with enormous haste. They are a lot of fun.
I wish I was better at v.g. but oh well, lol.

Quote:
And, for everyone else who finds driving difficult, how do you do at side-scrolling video games (or any video games that require quick reflexes) like Super Mario Bros.? I'm wondering if the 'motor skills' and reflexes needed for driving are the same needed to play quick-reflexes-required video games well. It seems there's a preference for Strategy and RPG games among aspies, and I wonder if that preference might be influenced by reflex ability as they typically don't require quick reflexes (Like Side-Scrollers).

In my case they aren't. I can't even play those driving video games. 8O The steering wheel is way different than the one in a car. It's too...touchy.



swbluto
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2011
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,899
Location: In the Andes, counting the stars and wondering if one of them is home to another civilization

13 May 2011, 1:07 am

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
swbluto wrote:
I hate to bolster my position as the local un-diagnosing troll, but I have to say that you seem to be on the more "mild" side of the autistic spectrum judging from your employment, driving ability, typical introvertive perspective and fairly normal language patterns. But, it could also be that those with AS with high performance IQs or processing speeds or some such could compensate well enough to mask the AS-related difficulties, or make them "easier" than the typical difficulties for your average everyday person, or better-skilled than average. If I have AS (I actually think I'm more along the lines of schizo*, if anything), then that might explain why I excel in reflex ability.

I am on the mild side! I can drive, but I don't have a job. I have many difficulties, it's just that driving isn't one of them. I ha extensive evaluations throughout childhood making sure I was developing properly but was never told I was autistic, just HD. Later, I found out I am mildly autistic, but my mom thought I would outgrow it, so she didn't make a big deal out of it. She thought I was cognitively advantaged and that would be enough to catapult me into enormous success.


Oh, bad assumption on my part, lol. What does HD mean?

Quote:
Quote:
I was also the local Mario Bros. champ when I was 5 (Where you had to time jumps and movement perfectly to avoid getting hit by bullets or whatever.), so my reflexes are probably pretty good. Plus, I can balance a foamy cylinder exercise thingy on my finger better than anyone I know! lol

Yeah, so I'm kind of wondering. Were/Are you good at video games?

Concerning video games, I am a meager mediocre but one thing I have loads of talent for and excell exceedingly at is cryptograms. I can do them with enormous haste. They are a lot of fun.
I wish I was better at v.g. but oh well, lol.


Weird, I also do really well at the letter-word games (like anagrams). I would often get the 7-letter anagrams on MSN within 10 seconds or less (In fact, my relatives would often just point the laptop screen in my direction and ask "What's this supposed to be?". I think I started bugging them after I routinely insisted on solving it for them and they purposely tried to keep me out of it after a while, lol.), and I attributed that possibly to my enormous storehouse of verbal knowledge and high processing speeds, but I'm now thinking that might be autism. 8O (Well, I don't honestly know too many people with a lot of verbal knowledge and high processing speeds, so I can't really test that hypothesis.)



Quote:
Quote:
And, for everyone else who finds driving difficult, how do you do at side-scrolling video games (or any video games that require quick reflexes) like Super Mario Bros.? I'm wondering if the 'motor skills' and reflexes needed for driving are the same needed to play quick-reflexes-required video games well. It seems there's a preference for Strategy and RPG games among aspies, and I wonder if that preference might be influenced by reflex ability as they typically don't require quick reflexes (Like Side-Scrollers).

In my case they aren't. I can't even play those driving video games. 8O The steering wheel is way different than the one in a car. It's too...touchy.


I've never tried the realistic steering wheels, but I have tried the Wii's hold-the-controller-side-ways "steering wheel" and, heck yeah, they are far too sensitive! It seems like driving is a lesson on how to move the controller as little as possible. 2 degrees of rotation is just too much! lol